"Ouch" moments in school

The school experience. School related queries, discussions, and stories that aren't specific to a subject.

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mdyrud
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby mdyrud » Sat Jun 28, 2008 2:34 am UTC

In Geometry there was a girl in my class who was rather poor at math. I would try to explain things to her, but she would rather just copy my answers. Eventually I decided to drop a hint that she should stop, so, in my free time, I filled out a problem sheet completely wrong in addition to the one that I turned in that was done correctly. I figured she would get the idea when she saw the various chemistry, calculus, and latin based answers. Nope. She copied them all and turned it in. I felt like the biggest jerk ever.

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shizam
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby shizam » Sat Jun 28, 2008 3:17 am UTC

In 3rd grade, we were given an assignment where we had to name as many words as we could that began with the letter O within a certain time limit. I had been playing "Ocarina of Time" so I put down Ocarina as one of my words. When we stood up and and started naming off our words, the teacher stopped me and said Ocarina wasn't a word. And that was the first time I raged at a teacher.
......nah

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Rakysh » Sat Jun 28, 2008 4:01 am UTC

My English teacher was writing on the board, and mis-spelled several easy words. Me and the other smartasses ripped the piss out of her for about half an hour, until she finally snapped, gave the pen to me, and said, "well then you do it"

Luckily I spelled everything she gave me right, which pissed her off even more. Then the bitch gave me "Diegetic". I didn't even know what it meant, never mind how to spell it. So she started laughing at me, as did some of the dumbasses, so I put the pen down, and said "well I'm not paid to get it right, am I." which shut her up.

Nearly an ouch moment for me I guess.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Tenth Speed Writer » Sat Jun 28, 2008 3:46 pm UTC

Took a blow to my geek pride the other day.

Taking a Math 113 course this summer so I can D.E. Calculus 1 and Physics for Engineering Majors during the upcoming two semesters (High school senior year.)

It's the same math I had this past year as a H.S. course. Pre-calculus trigonometry.





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jakeyizle
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby jakeyizle » Mon Jun 30, 2008 2:58 am UTC

In 7/8th grade (I don't remember) my friend failed Home Ec.

An almost ouch moment: another friend brought in his USB for a powerpoint presentation in History. He plugged it in and the teacher almost opened up his porn folder that was filled with lolicon.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby setris » Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:45 pm UTC

In chemistry honors in sophomore year of high school, we took a quiz on basic stoichiometry. The concept was a little hard to grasp at first, but most of us got it, more or less, by the quiz. Stoichiometry is work-intense, and you usually can't just "do the work in your head." A friend of mine, who was right along with me near the top of the class, got his back, and it had a 33 on it. I had the same answers. and had 100. It turns out he "didn't think we had to show the work." It's not like he cheated or anything, he just pulled a really dumb move, in this case, turning a test in with all the right answers. No work, but all the right answers.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby ihearteelstheband » Fri Jul 04, 2008 7:17 am UTC

this must sound so high-schooly, but any way,

it was the first maths test of year seven, and im not that confident in it *legasp*.

anyway, i was really REALLY nervous.

about half way through the test the guy behind me kicks my chair and says, "will you go out with me?"

not only was i completly surprised, but pretty pissed off too. we could get zero's if we were caught talking, so i said, "up yours!!"

OUCH for him.

but still crappy timing on his part.

and anyway, i have a feeling that i am reaping the rewards; i havent been asked out since and i thinks its for fear of an insult.

ouch for me.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Brother Maynard » Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:02 pm UTC

Rakysh wrote:My English teacher was writing on the board, and mis-spelled several easy words. Me and the other smartasses ripped the piss out of her for about half an hour, until she finally snapped, gave the pen to me, and said, "well then you do it"

Luckily I spelled everything she gave me right, which pissed her off even more. Then the bitch gave me "Diegetic". I didn't even know what it meant, never mind how to spell it. So she started laughing at me, as did some of the dumbasses, so I put the pen down, and said "well I'm not paid to get it right, am I." which shut her up.

Nearly an ouch moment for me I guess.


If there were an applaud emote, I'd give that.

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Poochy
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Poochy » Sat Jul 05, 2008 4:49 pm UTC

This probably isn't too bad of an "ouch" moment, but more of a "D'oh!" moment. Anyways, I was once working on a physics problem set (the night before it was due) when I forgot a formula, and didn't have my textbook handy. So I went and did a bunch of work (right on the paper I turned in) to re-derive the formula using vector calculus. And after I finally finished the problem, I noticed that the back side of the handout had a list of equations that might come in handy on the problem set, including the one I re-derived. D'oh!

At least I got full credit on that problem, if I remember correctly.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby BlackRiven » Sat Jul 05, 2008 10:22 pm UTC

I've a major one.
It was the end of the high school year and I had a final on computer science. It was my favorite subject, and I always got straight 100's in it and really knew the material well.
On the night before the exam I couldn't fall asleep; I wasn't nervous or anything, but for some reason I couldn't fall asleep so I just spent the night lying with my eyes closed. Morning comes, I look up at the clock, see that it's time to get up, and immediately fall asleep. An hour later I'm awakened by a call from my friend (backed by the CS teacher) asking where I am, the test is starting right now. I freak out, jump out of bed, get dressed and start looking for my notebooks (it was an open book test). I can't find any of them and end up running to school with one notebook that barely had anything written in it, still half asleep (I later found out that all the notebooks I had were neatly stacked in a corner of my messy room which I overlooked). Upon arriving 20 minutes late (luckily I lived pretty close to the school) I get reprimended in front of the whole class by the teacher in charge of all the 11th grades, and then I start to do the test, with 30 minutes less.
I did finish the test, and thought I did fairly well, until the results came and I found out I barely passed. It still puzzles me because although the circumstances were horrible I did know what I was doing, and I've no idea how I managed to screw it up that much.

Anyway, previous exams have kept my overall score at 89, so in the end that wasn't a huge ouch. The bigger ouch came next year, when my sister was taking the same class, and as the finals drew near my CS teacher started telling them the story of how I fucked up my exam to encourage them to be on time. When he finished, someone from the class asked: 'didn't it feel like a waste of a phone call?' And he replied: 'well, he was my best student'. That made me feel really shitty. I'm still hoping to run across him someday to tell him I now study computer science in one of the top 40 engineering universities in the world.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby MikeBabaguh » Mon Jul 07, 2008 10:56 am UTC

Fall 2007 I took a class where the teacher was experimenting with online quizzes as the majority of your grade. There were eight total, 25 questions each.

A week before the final and after the last quiz the teacher announces that he thought it went well, and that the class average per quiz was a score of 18/25. On an online quiz. That you take at home. And you can use your text and class notes. And you even have google and wikipedia to help you out.

My average was 24/25. I think I facepalmed right there in class.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby rrwoods » Tue Jul 08, 2008 7:32 pm UTC

Cooley wrote:We spent two weeks learning how to verify trigonometric identities. I thought I had them down cold, even though I missed the first day of the section.

Big mistake.

Apparently that was the only day she talked about methods one and two. The entire test consisted of "use method 1 to verify:..."

I got a 5/30, by sheer luck. That test brought me down to an F immediately, and I've only now managed to get it back to a mildly embarrassing C-.

Ouch.

This shit pisses me off. "Method 1"? What the fuck is that? What if someone else calls that method by another name?


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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby fallenstar » Tue Jul 08, 2008 9:01 pm UTC

FortMax wrote:One of my friends managed to get -8 out of 100 on a Language Arts exam in 8th grade.


On our first paper in 10th grade English, one person got a perfect 50. Most people got in the 20s or 30s, but almost a third of the class got negative scores. Luckily, the teacher let us rewrite the paper, so the scores ended up a lot better, but still, for kids who are used to getting A's and B's in everything, it came as quite a shock.

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stewie
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby stewie » Tue Jul 08, 2008 9:06 pm UTC

How the Hell Ass Balls did you get negative scores?
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby nyeguy » Tue Jul 08, 2008 9:58 pm UTC

fallenstar wrote:
FortMax wrote:One of my friends managed to get -8 out of 100 on a Language Arts exam in 8th grade.


On our first paper in 10th grade English, one person got a perfect 50. Most people got in the 20s or 30s, but almost a third of the class got negative scores. Luckily, the teacher let us rewrite the paper, so the scores ended up a lot better, but still, for kids who are used to getting A's and B's in everything, it came as quite a shock.

Sounds just like my 10th grade (advanced) English course. Most people were happy to finally be getting Bs and Cs on essays a month or two in.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Cooley » Wed Jul 09, 2008 1:14 am UTC

rrwoods wrote:Cooley wrote:
We spent two weeks learning how to verify trigonometric identities. I thought I had them down cold, even though I missed the first day of the section.

Big mistake.

Apparently that was the only day she talked about methods one and two. The entire test consisted of "use method 1 to verify:..."

I got a 5/30, by sheer luck. That test brought me down to an F immediately, and I've only now managed to get it back to a mildly embarrassing C-.

Ouch.

This shit pisses me off. "Method 1"? What the fuck is that? What if someone else calls that method by another name?


I know, right? If someone had spent 10 seconds to tell me the difference between methods, I'd have gotten it, because I actually did know my shit.

but I did well on the final, and I scraped a 80.0% Huzzah.

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Znath
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Znath » Wed Jul 09, 2008 2:00 am UTC

In my "Mechanical instrumentation" course the teacher is notoriously incompetent. The class itself is about 75% pointless because it's things we had taken already in several other classes, and then barely teaches anything new. On top of that, the test questions tended to ask extremely specific questions about things that weren't really in the book but rather in the slide presentations. The test came along and after scouring through all his lousy presentations and the totally unhelpful book I got a 59% at which point I fealt like dying because this was a "C or better to graduate" type course.

I also found out that the tests were 10% of the class (and curved) and labs were 90...
in case you wondered the average was in the 40% area, and the high was 72.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Intercept » Wed Jul 09, 2008 5:31 am UTC

In my freshmen high school English class we had read Great Expectations. Our teacher, who was a huge bitch all year long, not just as a teacher, but a person too made every question on the test an opinion question. Almost every question started with "What do you think?" or "How do you feel about...?" Almost no one in the class had actually read the book (I did of course) and yet almost everyone, including the people who DID read the book, failed. There was like one person who got an A, and this teacher played favorites all the time. Why did we fail? Somehow, everyone in the class's OPINION was wrong (except for hers of course.) What's worse? The first question was, "Why do you think people find it easy to relate to Pip?" I answered, I got half credit, and the explanation written on my test was that I didn't answer how I related to him. Sorry, I didn't notice the invisible secondary question.

After a classmate committed suicided, she made us read, I believe it was called The Hornet's Nest, a Hercule Poirot story where a man tries to commit suicide.

She also slept with students. Didn't get fired, just didn't get her contract renewed after the year.

What's worse? The next year, a wonderful teacher got reassigned to an alternative school at the beginning of the fourth quarter, simply because two other science teachers (who were widely believed to be terrible teachers by the student body) didn't like him and his methods. One time, he decided to be nice and give us two word finds as a chance to get some extra credit. One was about biology, the other about him and random funny things we discussed in class. The sick part? One morning (this was my first class of the day) I was in the classroom and he wasn't. The two other teachers came in looked through his things, and when they found the word find started talking about how it wasn't at all biology related. It makes me sick to this day that I didn't say something about it. I probably could have stopped it, as I was a bright but generally quiet student, which got the respect of one of the teachers, and I was the star of quiz bowl team, and the other one was the head coach. I've gotten over it to an extent, simply because it forced me to make correct decisions later in life.


EDIT:
I have horrible handwriting. This has screwed me twice in life.

1) In sixth grade, I had been absent a lot, so I had to have my father sign an absenteeism form. The problem: He has similar terrible handwriting. My English teacher dragged me out of the class telling me to admit my forgery. She then went on to say that I wasn't lying, I was just telling her something other than the truth. Huh..?

2) I'm very good at writing essay, always getting near perfects when I actually give a damn about the subject. On the ACT writing exams, the subject was should schools be able to stop school papers from writing publishing stories that negatively reflect on the school. I said they shouldn't, wrote a paragraph destroying the most prevalent counter-argument (BTW, I went to a school that poured all of it's budget into sports, which wouldn't be bad, if we were any good at sports.) I had also been in journalism class. I got an 8 out of 12, which was a bit strange. Of course handwriting counts so that explains it.

Also, about being called out in class, on an AP chem final 3/4 of the questions were about stuff from the first semester we hadn't been over the whole second semester. Of course, I got a 50 (Edit: I suppose I should mention it was out of 200). I really like the teacher, but when he was handing them out he specifically said he was really disappointed in me. It kind of sucked.
Last edited by Intercept on Wed Jul 09, 2008 6:39 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Master Gunner » Wed Jul 09, 2008 5:01 pm UTC

Intercept wrote:The first question was, "Why do you think people find it easy to relate to Pip?" I answered, I got half credit, and the explanation written on my test was that I didn't answer how I related to him. Sorry, I didn't notice the invisible secondary question.


I hate it when teachers do that, and it seems to happen mainly with English teachers. Never had a science teacher ask invisible questions. Then again, science teachers tend to know full well that telepathy is a myth, and contrary to what most English teachers think, we cannot read your fraking minds, nor would we want to if we could. Seriously, if you ask me the date, I will give you the date in whatever the dominant local calender is. I'm not going to tell you the time, or the date in a different calendar system, because you didn't gorram ask for it.

Yes, I have anger problems when it comes to bad teachers and their assignments.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby fishyfish777 » Thu Jul 10, 2008 11:45 am UTC

Master Gunner wrote:
Intercept wrote:The first question was, "Why do you think people find it easy to relate to Pip?" I answered, I got half credit, and the explanation written on my test was that I didn't answer how I related to him. Sorry, I didn't notice the invisible secondary question.


I hate it when teachers do that, and it seems to happen mainly with English teachers. Never had a science teacher ask invisible questions. Then again, science teachers tend to know full well that telepathy is a myth, and contrary to what most English teachers think, we cannot read your fraking minds, nor would we want to if we could. Seriously, if you ask me the date, I will give you the date in whatever the dominant local calender is. I'm not going to tell you the time, or the date in a different calendar system, because you didn't gorram ask for it.

Yes, I have anger problems when it comes to bad teachers and their assignments.


When it comes to bad teachers and their assignments, I had this Math teacher. OH GOD how I hated her grading scale. It was based on 5 points:

Time - 2 pts (on time points)
Correct - 2 pts (If you correct what you got wrong, 2 pts)
Neatness - 1 pt (If you were neat, 1 pt)

gawd I laughed at everyone getting low test scores. Mine were always the best.

When it comes to invisible secondary questions, I think some teachers are dumb enough to give people points for effort. It's not how much work you put into it, it's that you got it right when it counts. When you take up demolition or construction, one bad slip could kill 30+ people.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby fallenstar » Fri Jul 11, 2008 6:30 pm UTC

Master Gunner wrote:
Intercept wrote:The first question was, "Why do you think people find it easy to relate to Pip?" I answered, I got half credit, and the explanation written on my test was that I didn't answer how I related to him. Sorry, I didn't notice the invisible secondary question.


I hate it when teachers do that, and it seems to happen mainly with English teachers. Never had a science teacher ask invisible questions.


My math teacher this year seemed to ask invisible questions. At least, on one project. We were studying exponential data, so our assignment was to find a set of exponential data, graph it and it's equation of best-fit, and then do an analysis. But it seems that she failed to mention that we needed a third graph, of who-knows-what, so I actually think everybody except maybe one or two people got five points off (this was worth about 30, so that's quite a bit) for their "missing" graph that she never actually told us we needed to have.

By this time, everybody hated her already, so this was just another reason.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Censored » Sun Jul 13, 2008 5:42 am UTC

Master Gunner wrote:
Intercept wrote:The first question was, "Why do you think people find it easy to relate to Pip?" I answered, I got half credit, and the explanation written on my test was that I didn't answer how I related to him. Sorry, I didn't notice the invisible secondary question.


I hate it when teachers do that, and it seems to happen mainly with English teachers. Never had a science teacher ask invisible questions.


Hmmm.

I have a kinda long story about a science teacher and invisible questions.

So my science teacher sophomore year (which just ended for me) was incredibly disliked by most of her students. I think it was a combination of two things: she could not teach, and the way she graded every single assignment was utterly subjective. But for some bizarre reason, I was on her good side. I don't know why - I'm very loud, kinda obnoxious, and I spend a good portion of lab days breaking things. Maybe it had something to do with me buying her a Christmas present. Regardless, there was this one 50-point lab where one of the analysis questions read something along the lines of "Calculate the molecular mass of this gas based on how fast it diffused." I get my otherwise seemingly perfect lab back; that question has a red -1 and "need to compare to mass of other gases" scrawled beneath it. I was like "cool, 49/50, thanks" and sat pretty contentedly until my friend behind me asks how I did. We were in the same lab group, and I let her copy my analysis answers, so I figure she would have gotten the same score as me, give or take a point or two. I tell her "49", and she goes "WTF?" She didn't "compare to mass of other gases" either, but got -5. And then another -5 on a different analysis question. For what reason I have no clue. My friend accused me of sleeping with this science teacher. We are still friends though.

Moral of the story: science teachers != objective

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Poochy » Sun Jul 13, 2008 6:34 am UTC

Censored wrote:Moral of the story: science teachers != objective

Actually, I've found that good science teachers are objective. The bad ones are the ones that aren't objective. I had a different science teacher each year of high school, and the ones I liked and respected always graded stuff based on how correct it is. I distinctly remember my AP Physics teacher giving me full credit on one problem on a quiz when I arrived at the correct answer after filling half the page with really messy (read: nearly illegible) work which didn't use the method he was looking for. His policy was basically "if you arrived at the correct answer and showed enough work to explain how you got it, you get full credit."

Then there was basically the single worst science teacher I've ever seen. (Okay, so I've heard of worse, but I've never seen them.) She was actually quite knowledgeable about chemistry, and I think she could've made a great researcher, but she just couldn't teach worth a hill of beans. People would get lab reports returned with "Data table lines not straight enough. -1" and "Handwriting! -1". Not to mention she'd nitpick and take off points for the most banal things. I once lost a point for writing "ion" instead of "polyatomic ion", when the fact that the ion has multiple atoms wasn't even too important. She was even worse with projects, too. She was basically the only Honors/AP science teacher that'd assign crap like "make a flipbook of a chemical reaction" and "take a picture of yourself with your textbook somewhere interesting and original", then deducted a ton of points for "creativity" and "originality" and "effort". And this was an HONORS chemistry teacher.

She also demanded everything be handwritten, then would complain about handwriting constantly. On one occasion, after seeing that I had typed my problem set so she couldn't whine about my handwriting, she said we needed to write problem sets in pencil "so you can erase if you make a mistake." I asked her why hitting Backspace was any different. She changed the subject.

Plus she also wouldn't show us any rubric for lab reports or projects until after we turned them in. Did I mention that I can't read minds?

We ended up with a bunch of disgruntled students (of the multiple-AP-classes variety, mind you) calling her stuff like "Mrs. Simon Cowell" and "Anne Robinson" behind her back. I preferred "the bastard child of Simon Cowell and Anne Robinson", myself.

Anyways, this led to my own "ouch" moment. She assigned a project consisting entirely of worthless "creative" BS (including the aforementioned flipbook), which I actually worked at. When we got the rubric (well after it was due, as usual), it was worth 120 points. I think she weighted it as a test grade, too. Then I got my grade, which was a C. I'm a top-notch A student when it comes to math and science, mind you. And EVERY point I lost was for either "creativity", "originality", or "effort".

This was the straw that broke the camel's back, and it led to a long string of a mix of Japanese cussing and plain-English exclamations about what a horrible teacher she was. I managed to hold it in until I was out of the room, but unfortunately I didn't think she was still in earshot. Did I mention she plays favorites a lot?

(Thankfully, I managed to pull my grade back up to an A- after acing the final. Because she can't take off points for a correct answer on multiple-choice or short-answer. HA! :P)

The one good thing that came out of this was that she was the main reason I didn't take AP Chemistry; she also taught AP Chem, and I didn't want another year of her. Which led to me filling the open slot on my schedule with AP Statistics, an awesome class with one of the best teachers I've ever had (see the "Awesome Teacher Quotes" thread for a few selections).
Last edited by Poochy on Sun Jul 13, 2008 7:55 am UTC, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Censored » Sun Jul 13, 2008 6:59 am UTC

That sounds exactly like how a large number of my friends would describe my former Honors Chemistry teacher. It sucks having a teacher like that :\ . I remember in my freshman year, my biology teacher was (in retrospect) a mad chill guy, but he was ridiculously incompetent in terms of teaching. I also annoyed him a lot, which definitely did not help my grades.

I guess a lot of teachers play favorites to some extent. The way I figure, the trick is not to complain, but to get on their good side, despite the little voice in my head telling me "wow you have no pride".

This will probably get me a reaction similar to as if I said "jonas brothers rulz" on a forum inhabited by closed-minded 13-year-olds. I hope it doesn't. Some of my teachers like the Jonas Brothers, and I like drawing parallels.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Poochy » Sun Jul 13, 2008 8:55 am UTC

Censored wrote:I guess a lot of teachers play favorites to some extent. The way I figure, the trick is not to complain, but to get on their good side, despite the little voice in my head telling me "wow you have no pride".

Well, I've actually had a lot of great teachers that played favorites, in what I consider to be a fair way. Specifically, many teachers I've had would let some of their better students get away with pretty much anything in class that wouldn't get them arrested, while breathing down other students' backs. Why? Because they trusted the former group based on their previous track records in class. They still never let it get in the way of fair grading. For example, when I was taking AP Statistics, I became one of my teacher's favorite students (though I swear I didn't intentionally kiss up to him). On a couple occasions, I ended up running into class late, and A: he never marked me as late, and B: on one occasion, he even told me (in a low voice) something along the lines of "Take your time if you need to, no need to run. You're a trustworthy guy." Yet he'd still be pretty strict about it when others came in late. But when the test came, I had no advantage. He marked my errors off exactly the same as everyone else's; I had a few mediocre free-response test scores even in the second semester. And as far as I'm concerned, that was a good thing, because it meant when I did ace a free-response test, I actually earned it and didn't brown-nose my way to it.

My previous Honors Chem teacher (the one I mentioned earlier), however, was nothing like that. The students she liked almost always got perfect or at least near-perfect scores. Even when stuff was peer-graded, they were allowed to contest their scores and always ended up with a better score. So I tried contesting my score once, only to have her take another point off. I think one student (again, one of her favorites) even got full credit for an assignment he handed in late. Same student also once had a rather low score (B-, I think) from a peer-graded lab report. He contested it, and said teacher overrode the peer grade and gave him a perfect score.

The one reprieve we had was that the vast majority of our tests were multiple-choice using Scantron sheets, since (as she said herself) she was too lazy to grade a bunch of tests by hand. And she HAD to be objective there, since it's much harder to get away with shenanigans when grading multiple-choice.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby nyeguy » Sun Jul 13, 2008 6:26 pm UTC

Poochy wrote:
Censored wrote:I guess a lot of teachers play favorites to some extent. The way I figure, the trick is not to complain, but to get on their good side, despite the little voice in my head telling me "wow you have no pride".

Well, I've actually had a lot of great teachers that played favorites, in what I consider to be a fair way. Specifically, many teachers I've had would let some of their better students get away with pretty much anything in class that wouldn't get them arrested, while breathing down other students' backs. Why? Because they trusted the former group based on their previous track records in class. They still never let it get in the way of fair grading. For example, when I was taking AP Statistics, I became one of my teacher's favorite students (though I swear I didn't intentionally kiss up to him). On a couple occasions, I ended up running into class late, and A: he never marked me as late, and B: on one occasion, he even told me (in a low voice) something along the lines of "Take your time if you need to, no need to run. You're a trustworthy guy." Yet he'd still be pretty strict about it when others came in late. But when the test came, I had no advantage. He marked my errors off exactly the same as everyone else's; I had a few mediocre free-response test scores even in the second semester. And as far as I'm concerned, that was a good thing, because it meant when I did ace a free-response test, I actually earned it and didn't brown-nose my way to it.


I get teachers like this all the time. I basically do nothing the first two weeks, come in early and get all my work done promptly, etc, and they love me. After that, I can do almost anything. My chem teacher last year was especially nice. I would come in late as often as once a week (usually because the band room was locked, but not always), and he just trusted I had a good reason. I was almost never marked late to that class. However, he did once let me finish a problem I accidently skipped on a quiz for full credit, because it was the same as the ones around it and I had been perfect on them, so he trusted it was just a mistake.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Sasha » Sun Jul 13, 2008 8:35 pm UTC

I have had a few bad "Ouch" moments, the most recent:

Five days left of school. Nice science teacher, Mr. Armstrong, walks into the room and announces that there will be a final worth 100 points, which comes out to a third of our final grades, and I was doing pretty decently. Passes out the test, and the first line is a question asking that the elemental number of gallium is. It gets progressively harder.

I remember the class is BIOLOGY. Squishy critters and such.

I read the directions to the test. It's normal direction gobbledygook, until about halfway through. Then it tells you to put your pencil down after erasing all marks on the page except your name (which i forgot to write down, up until this point).

I got 100/100, everyone else was graded on how well they did based on the 10 questions. Only perfect mark in the class.
I passed, with a B.
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Aylology » Mon Jul 14, 2008 1:46 am UTC

Ouch moments, hmm. Here's my worst...

So, first year of university is coming to an end. I'm doing well in Biology, I'm doing well in Spanish, I'm scraping by in Stats, and.... I'm doing terribly in Chemistry.

The chair of the Chemistry department spent tonnes of extra time with me, trying to help me GET the material. And he didn't understand why I was failing the assignments (all randomly-generated and computer-graded, which is a whole other aggravation for another story) because when I discussed the material with him, I sounded like I knew what I was talking about. For some reasons, the calculations screwed me over completely though, and I was failing every assignment.

So I studied. I got a tutor, on top of the chair's extra time. I studied so much I didn't study as much as I should have for my Bio or Stats exams.

Here comes the day of the Chemistry final. It's at 9.30 in the morning, and I have an hour and a half commute. Of course, the weather is not cooperating, and I end up being 20 minutes late, and soaked, thanks to snow/slush/rain. Also, I am so frustrated that I am bawling my eyes out. I basically walk into the exam room looking like a drowned rat. The prof who'd been helping me all term comes over and finds me a seat (huge class) and tells me to just relax and take it as it comes.

The ouch is that I still failed (the entire course), AND because I spent so much time studying for it, I ended up getting a crappy enough mark on my Bio final to bring me down to a C+ and a crappy enough mark on my Stats final that I only just barely passed.

(I ended up retaking the chem class in the summer and got a B. Yay!)

(And Dr. Pincock of Dalhousie University is my hero. He tried so much to help me! He was so patient and just generally awesome. So. If you're ever finding yourself in a chemistry class at Dal... Dr. Pincock should be on your good list, cause he's amazing!)
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby tday93 » Mon Jul 14, 2008 4:17 am UTC

Aylology wrote: ...the assignments (all randomly-generated and computer-graded, which is a whole other aggravation for another story)


MCWebs perhaps?

those are the epiome of painful when it comes to my high schools sophmore AP Chem class...


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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby crp » Tue Jul 15, 2008 3:20 am UTC

I haven't had very many ouch moments

But here's one from collegeboard.com

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How i stack up compared to 297% of the students...

And yes, it does stack up(everyone in top 10% counts as top quarter and half)

But still
Ridiculous lol

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby BirdKiller » Tue Jul 15, 2008 3:43 pm UTC

Actually, that graph does make sense, just that the max percentage should've been at 99% in the lower two bars instead of 100%. That, or we're reading the graph wrong: Without even knowing the title of that graph, we can make a lot of interpretations.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Shakleton » Wed Jul 16, 2008 7:04 pm UTC

Oh, Oh, do ouch moments for the teacher count as well?

One of our teachers in grade...well 6 or 7 out of 13..... called in sick and we got a substitute. And you could watch members of my class walking up to the substitue-board and hear them moan all morning because it was the most feared and most dreadful teacher at our school.

When he walked into our classroom we made mistake 1. We didn't instantly freeze and zap to our desks. The teacher, not having spoken a word in "indoor-voice" yet starts to shout: EVERYBODY! TO THEIR DESKS! NOW! We instantly freeze and zap to our desks. The shouting goes on: EVERYBODY PACK AWAY ERYTHING AND PUT THEIR HANDS ON THEIR DESKS IMMEDIATELY. YOU THERE! NO PENCILS! YOU THERE! NO MIRRORS! YOU THERE! NO CALCULATORS! (that one was me)

by this time, we were rly scared of that guy. Nobody usually ever shouted agt us. And nobody had that ready-to-kill-look on their face.

NOW! WE'RE DOING ENGLISCH! (German School, remember) I WILL PLAY THIS CASSETTE TO YOU. IT WILL READ OUT THE GERMAN WORDS AND THE ENGLISH WORD! AFTER THE GERMAN WORD I'LL STOP AND YOU'LL GIVE ME THE ENGLISH WORD! YOU THERE! NO PAPER ON YOUR DESK!

The game starts. With united powers of one class we can solve most of the words. The teacher would call out "YOU" with pointing at someone who had exactly one second to give the answer or to fail his chance and then go on to next word/student. Always interrupted by "YOU THERE! HAVE YOUR HANDS ON YOUR DESK!" The game goes on, we do fairly well. But then.

The word "Rasierapparat" comes up. (Engl. = Shaver) The play-soccer-really-great-being-slim-as-well-over-the-top-coolness-is-every-girls-dream-guy in the class could not hold it any longer and laughed out. "Bwhahaha! I wette das heisst Raischa-apparate" (Engl. = Bwhahaha! I bet that one is "raisha") rly loud through the whole class. What a death sentence he signed.

I can remember that moment pretty well. The teacher turns his head, his eyes performing the scariest killer-stare I've seen in my whole life.
HOW DARE YOU INTERRUPTING MY CLASS WITHOUT LIFTING YOUR FINGER AND YET WITH THE MOST COMPLETE NONSENSE I HAVE HEARD EVER? THAT WORD DOES NOT EVEN EXIST IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE YOU IDIOT! IF YOU WANT TO DESTROY CLASSES, WELL NOT WITH ME! HOW DARE YOU?! HOW IS IT POSSIBLE TO THINK OF SUCH DESTRUCTIVE NONSENSE? IS THERE SOMETHING WRONG WITH YOU? YOU SHOULD BE EXPELLED UNTIL YOU VISITED A BEHAVIOUR-IN-CLASS-SCHOOL! WE DONT NEED YOUR KIND HERE. *writes a note on a sheet of confiscated paper* HERE! TAKE THIS TO THE PRINCIPAL!

Dead silence. Interrupting-guy stands up with no facial expression whatsoever, goes to the teacher and takes the note. He was a freaking HERO for the rest of us at that moment. On his way to the door, the teacher presses the play button. And out comes "Razor". With EXACTLY the same pronounciation as note-guy said it before. He got screamed at for nothing at all. He spins around and truly everybody now stares at the teacher, who gets a little pale.

5 seconds of dead silence. No-one even dared to breathe and brake the precious moment.

The teacher blinks, turns to the student and more muffles than says: "Well, erm, in that case you can stay. Go to your desk please" The class bursts out in laughter and in cheers for right-in-the-end-guy. This is a moment I will never forget.

Ouch for the teacher!
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby The Hyphenator » Wed Jul 16, 2008 11:18 pm UTC

Master Gunner wrote:
Intercept wrote:The first question was, "Why do you think people find it easy to relate to Pip?" I answered, I got half credit, and the explanation written on my test was that I didn't answer how I related to him. Sorry, I didn't notice the invisible secondary question.


I hate it when teachers do that, and it seems to happen mainly with English teachers. Never had a science teacher ask invisible questions. Then again, science teachers tend to know full well that telepathy is a myth, and contrary to what most English teachers think, we cannot read your fraking minds, nor would we want to if we could. Seriously, if you ask me the date, I will give you the date in whatever the dominant local calender is. I'm not going to tell you the time, or the date in a different calendar system, because you didn't gorram ask for it.

Yes, I have anger problems when it comes to bad teachers and their assignments.

My English teacher kinda does that too. On a quiz about Tuesdays with Morrie (I hate that book, mainly because she taught it badly :) ), there was a question asking something like "What does Morrie say is wrong with our culture?" Now there are about 138293894 things Morrie says is wrong with our culture, so I chose one, and it turned out not to be the specific one she was thinking of. :evil:

Even worse: She mentioned at the beginning of the Tuesdays with Morrie section that she would only be asking questions on people, events, and lessons from the book, not just random facts. And yet, in almost all of our quizzes, most of the questions were just that: random facts. I suppose just about anything can be loosely tied to "people, events, and lessons", actually. :roll:

By the end of that section, I had a low B, but still managed to pull out an A at the end of the year, because the teacher was pregnant and we had a substitute for the last quarter. :)
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Aylology » Thu Jul 17, 2008 6:07 am UTC

tday93 wrote:MCWebs perhaps?


No, Blackboard Learning Systems - What they lovingly call "BLS" (pronounced "bliss") and I lovingly call "the bane of my dire existence".

:P
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby tday93 » Thu Jul 17, 2008 9:16 pm UTC

Aylology wrote:
tday93 wrote:MCWebs perhaps?


No, Blackboard Learning Systems - What they lovingly call "BLS" (pronounced "bliss") and I lovingly call "the bane of my dire existence".

:P



ah, never heard of those...

we have several obscene names for MCWebs, they change depending on what the program just did

(you should here the names for it when it glitches....)
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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby DistributePi » Sat Jul 26, 2008 6:47 pm UTC

In my english class, we were told to write a poem, and that we would have a week to do it. I put in a lot of effort and actually wrote from my own experiences like my teacher told us to. I handed it in feeling pretty good about what I had done. My grade? 75 percent.

The next month, we were assigned another poem and I really had no motivation to do it this time, so of course I procrastinated until the night before. I hastily scribbled something down on a piece of paper and handed it in, fully expecting to get another terrible mark. My grade this time? 95 percent. That day taught me that putting in any kind of effort in that class was a waste.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Why Two Kay » Sat Jul 26, 2008 8:48 pm UTC

In my 11th grade English class, an honors course, we had to do a critique on two film reviews of a "top 100 film" according to some arbitrary list. I chose the 1957 version of 12 Angry Men. I put lots of research time and effort into the project, and wrote out a thorough outline, as instructed by the teacher. The outline was worth 50 points, our "works cited" page was worth 20 points, and our presentation was worth 30 points.

Now, this being an older black and white movie, I expected people to get bored during my presentation, and so I expected some point loss there. Somehow, I scored all 30 points for presentation, including the creativity points.

My works cited page was flawless, and I scored all 20 points there.

On my outline, which I spent at least 4-5 hours doing research on, and spanned three or so pages, I scored only 17 of the 50 points. Other groups put almost no effort into it, and talked about things like "Superman was the hero... etc", and got all 50 points. They only spent about an hour typing it up, making most of it up as they went along.

The reason I lost so many points: format. My outline was not formatted properly. The format I used was a default Microsoft Word Numbered List. Where the top is a number (1, 2, 3), the next indent is a lowercase letter (a, b, c), and the second indent contains lowercase "i" (i, ii, iii).

The format I was supposed to use? The top should be a roman numeral (I, II, III, IX), the first indent should be an UPPERCASE letter (A, B, C), and the second indent should be a number (1, 2, 3). Is this default for anything? No. Why did they choose it? Because they wanted to.

I lost 3 points for every single one of those that I missed. Leaving me with a 67. If you do the math, that means over 50% of the grade for the Outline has to do with FORMAT and not CONTENT. I expect this in 7th grade Regular English, not 11th Grade Honors English.

That 67 dropped my average from a 98 to a 93, and made my final semester average (post-exam) be 92. Having an 93 would bring me up to the next GPA level level. If I got the 100 I deserved on the project, I would have had a 95 average for the semester.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Cooley » Sat Jul 26, 2008 11:32 pm UTC

Was the format you were supposed to use explained to you in the requirements for the project?

@DistributePi: That's rough, but some classes are like that. Typically English classes, but that's not a TREND or anything, right?

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby Cosmologicon » Sun Jul 27, 2008 4:04 am UTC

I'm good at physics, I really am. But the last quarter of high school physics, I did quite poorly on three tests in a row because of silly mistakes and failure to memorize details correctly.

After handing back one test, the teacher let people come to him to appeal for mercy points. I'd gotten half the answers wrong by a factor of 4pi because I mixed up luminous flux and luminous intensity. It was the only mistake I made, but it was in a lot of the questions and there was no partial credit, so I thought I was a good candidate for grade adjustment. He said, "I see you made the same mistake here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here. I'm going to be nice and only count you off half for this last one." I think it raised my grade from a 50% to a 53%. Gee, thanks.

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Re: "Ouch" moments in school

Postby stewie » Sun Jul 27, 2008 11:31 pm UTC

Last year (britain, year 9) we had a crazy french teacher was pretty awesome other than being completely insane (and a tad bit racist), boring the clever people by going too slow and making us learn present, perfect, imperfect and future of a specified irregular verb for every lesson. This was all written down from memory and then papers were swapped randomly around the room. I once got this guy's paper and he had made a consistent mistake through the whole paper, i don't remember exactly but i think he had missed one letter out from the earlier part of each version of the verb (so not actually the hard part to remember, which was mostly right). i asked the teacher and he said 'well, they're all wrong then'. luckily for the guy i was marking he then changed his mind and decided to only mark him down for the first 6 times (out of 26 marks) he made the mistake.

A month or so ago we had a shortened english exam in our lesson to give the teachers an idea what level to pitch the end of year exam. I got to the second question and it was something like 'how does the writer of item 1 use language to persuade the reader', for which you are supposed to say something along the lines of 'the writer uses emotive language here and here, they use short sentences here and here for effect' things like that. Which is complete bollocks. that's not even english, that's just application of buzzwords. learn what buzzword X means, say it is used here, give examples. full marks. well done, you have a GCSE in applying buzzwords. that'll look sexy on your CV for the Health & Safety Executive. I got rather annoyed about this and decided that rather than answering the question, expressing my feelings on the value of the 'skills' taught in GCSE 'English' (read as 'Buzzword application') would be a better use of my time. including the first question, i got 1 out of 18 for that bit of the exam, undoubtedly my lowest mark since i was about 5 years old
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