Career tests

The school experience. School related queries, discussions, and stories that aren't specific to a subject.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
Nyx
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2009 7:33 pm UTC

Career tests

Postby Nyx » Tue Aug 10, 2010 1:23 am UTC

Anyone know some good sites where i could take some tests to find out what kind of career my personality would best be suited for? I know theres a crap-ton on google, but I was wondering if anyone knew of any tried-tested and true ones out there.

cv4
Posts: 138
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 8:32 pm UTC

Re: Career tests

Postby cv4 » Tue Aug 10, 2010 11:31 am UTC

Don't listen to a free test on the internet?

nfine
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 4:02 pm UTC

Re: Career tests

Postby nfine » Wed Aug 11, 2010 4:09 pm UTC

As frustrating as it may be to not know what your calling is I would not trust a career test. Think big picture first, what excites you? Are you more qualitative than quantitative? Maybe you like a balance of the two. I'm not saying you should even be able to answer these questions yet - just keep them in the back of your mind as you go about your day.

deerie
Posts: 124
Joined: Sat Jul 31, 2010 6:20 am UTC

Re: Career tests

Postby deerie » Wed Aug 11, 2010 4:52 pm UTC

My high school used a website called eDiscover. I believe that the ACT website also has some similar tools. Take all of these results with a grain* of salt; your own intuition is generally better than a computer calculated result. The best way to get an idea of what you should do is to read about different professions, talk to people, and do internships or shadow people at their jobs.

*approximately the size of a golf ball

User avatar
Tualha
Posts: 69
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 12:18 pm UTC

Re: Career tests

Postby Tualha » Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:33 pm UTC

Could some kind person give some tips to this socially inept aspie about how to "talk to people" or "shadow people at their jobs"? I haven't the faintest idea how to approach perfect strangers and ask them about their jobs, let alone asking them if I can watch them work. The field I'm interested in is electronic engineering technology, or something along those lines.

(I should mention I'm not a high school student - I'm 45.)

Thanks in advance...

deerie
Posts: 124
Joined: Sat Jul 31, 2010 6:20 am UTC

Re: Career tests

Postby deerie » Fri Aug 13, 2010 6:18 am UTC

For high school students, shadowing at a parent's workplace or observing a friend of the family is a good place to start. Similarly, adults can start by asking a coworker or a family member to connect you to someone.If you want to start a conversation, "Hi, my name is ____" is extremely unlikely to elicit any strange looks. Explain that you're interested in the type of work this person does; start with a brief summary of relevant parts of your career or education, note why you are interested in the field, and ask some basic question about what the job is like or what the job options are.

If the conversation is going well, mention that you'd be interested in spending an hour or two observing an interesting project. (Saying "interesting project" or something similar will allow the person to use the excuse that nothing interesting is happening if she feels uncomfortable with the situation. Or if you would actually be watching someone do paper work for a few hours.) I'd try to keep your little monologue under 2-3 minutes and let the person answer questions for 5 minutes if s/he seems willing. Practice on family members or friends and plan out what you want to ask. You could always have a few brief conversations before asking to actually observe someone, since 3 minutes isn't exactly enough time to become great friends.

Handshakes are really good too. (And practicing handshakes can be really important!) Shake the person's hand when you introduce yourself. Shake his/her hand again at the end of the conversation. Express that it was nice to meet and talk to this person about the career, and that you appreciate the time s/he took to speak with you. Give some form of contact information (your office number or extension if the person is a distant coworker), but don't push for the same- it should be offered in exchange for yours if the person wants to continue speaking with you.

Also, don't approach people who look busy, rushed, are on their way to a meeting, haven't had their morning coffee, haven't had lunch, etc. Even a perfectly nice person can become a demon in those circumstances. Oh- people are generally nice. They're not trying to embarrass you. So don't be too intimidated.

User avatar
Tualha
Posts: 69
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 12:18 pm UTC

Re: Career tests

Postby Tualha » Fri Aug 13, 2010 7:16 pm UTC

I think you must have had experience explaining things to the clueless before; this is very informative and detailed without being condescending. Thank you very much!

User avatar
Velict
Posts: 609
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2008 9:07 pm UTC
Location: Icecrown Citadel

Re: Career tests

Postby Velict » Sat Aug 14, 2010 2:31 am UTC

Nyx wrote:Anyone know some good sites where i could take some tests to find out what kind of career my personality would best be suited for? I know theres a crap-ton on google, but I was wondering if anyone knew of any tried-tested and true ones out there.

http://www.amazon.com/Do-What-You-Are-P ... 040&sr=8-1

This book is pretty interesting, assuming you know your Myers-Briggs type.


Return to “School”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests