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1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:14 am UTC
by Kaelin
Image

title="Mmmm, this is such a positive experience! I feel no social pressure to enjoy it at all!"


There were many things I did early in my life to fit in, typically very awkwardly. Drinking beer (thankfully) was not one of them.

On the other hand, watching sports has often filled this role for me. It provides a constant drone of small talk so you never have to say anything personal or revealing.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:24 am UTC
by Copper Bezel
I assume this is the logic of light beers, at least.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:25 am UTC
by bobsomer
If you think beer has a bad taste, just come here in Belgium and I'll make you drink some of best things you'll ever drink!

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:31 am UTC
by badmartialarts
Not ALL beer

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:35 am UTC
by Derpetologist
It kind of bothers me that there are some people who legitimately can't understand how someone else might enjoy something that they don't.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:38 am UTC
by rhomboidal
Personally, I love the taste of anaerobically hydrolyzed yeast shit.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:07 am UTC
by petz
You don't like beer because of peer pressure. It's Stockholm syndrome.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:15 am UTC
by sfmans
"All beers taste kind of bad and everyone is just pretending"?

Wow, those guys are seriously drinking the wrong kind of beer.

If you can try and dislike all of

Boltmaker (Timothey Taylors) 1
Boondoggle (Ringwood)
Forty Niner (Ringwood)
Landlord (Timothy Taylors )
Old Hooky (Hook Norton)
Tanglefoot (Badger)
Wainwright (Thwaites)

Then you seriously don't like beer.

1. Which, incidentally, I often genuinely make the mistake of calling Bolt Thrower instead, which is a very different experience indeed http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolt_Thrower

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:24 am UTC
by tsotate
sfmans wrote:Wow, those guys are seriously drinking the wrong kind of beer.

The kind with hops in it? Because that's what makes beer taste so bad, and it's pretty much required by most definitions of "beer".

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:31 am UTC
by Khrushy
It's Friday afternoon, I want a beer, and I am damned sure it's not peer pressure speaking because if I wanted a different drink, I'd go have one.

That guy should man up and just drink what he wants.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:32 am UTC
by bachaddict
petz wrote:You don't like beer because of beer pressure. It's Stockholm syndrome.

How I read that at first.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 7:55 am UTC
by Yomar
I've met people like this in real life. Same for wine, whiskey etc. Yes, you've discovered our secret - we all secretly hate the taste of alcohol, and the thousands of years we've spent developing different varieties of it in cultures across the world is all an effort to find just one variety we can stand so that we can stop pretending. It's not YOU, it's everyone ELSE.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:13 am UTC
by iJ-1/9TSL3Ok
Nice to see more people admit beer tastes bad (way too bitter for me). The closest I've had to a good beer is ginger beer, like Crabbie's.
That said, pretty much all alcoholic drinks taste bad to me, in different ways. Same with coffee — much too bitter for me. My taste in drinks hasn't changed at all since I was a kid.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:14 am UTC
by Neil_Boekend
rhomboidal wrote:Personally, I love the taste of anaerobically hydrolyzed yeast shit.

On the contrary. My brewers guild taught me to airate the liquid that is going to become beer ("jongbier" or "malt bier" in Dutch). This is to get oxygen in there for the yeast. Else it dies. (although I have never risked a batch by skipping this.

tsotate wrote:
sfmans wrote:Wow, those guys are seriously drinking the wrong kind of beer.

The kind with hops in it? Because that's what makes beer taste so bad, and it's pretty much required by most definitions of "beer".

Hops are terrible. A bit of it can add to a beer but many beers have far to much hops. Especially small brewers tend to muck up their beer with it, exept for (for example) Belgian Dubbel, Bock. Most of these beers are quite dark with chocolaty tastes and a often a lot sweeter (although a good classic style Bock isn't sweet. That was a recent modification, giving rise to a new type of beer with the name of an old type).

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:17 am UTC
by biohazard
Yomar wrote:I've met people like this in real life. Same for wine, whiskey etc. Yes, you've discovered our secret - we all secretly hate the taste of alcohol, and the thousands of years we've spent developing different varieties of it in cultures across the world is all an effort to find just one variety we can stand so that we can stop pretending. It's not YOU, it's everyone ELSE.


Yeah its clearly not because life was pretty horrible for most of human existence and people wanted to get drunk.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:20 am UTC
by synp
tsotate wrote:
sfmans wrote:Wow, those guys are seriously drinking the wrong kind of beer.

The kind with hops in it? Because that's what makes beer taste so bad, and it's pretty much required by most definitions of "beer".

It's not the hops. It's the alcohol. That's why malt beer tastes great - it has the hops, but not the alcohol.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:28 am UTC
by Neil_Boekend
synp wrote:
tsotate wrote:
sfmans wrote:Wow, those guys are seriously drinking the wrong kind of beer.

The kind with hops in it? Because that's what makes beer taste so bad, and it's pretty much required by most definitions of "beer".

It's not the hops. It's the alcohol. That's why malt beer tastes great - it has the hops, but not the alcohol.

I love the alcohol, but especially malts are just terrible. The beer isn't fermented so all the sugar is still in it. Yuck, it it tastes like a warm viscous rotting liquid that pretends to be beer. Even when it's cold, not thick enough to be viscous and by definition less rotten than real beer.
If I don't want the alcohol (due to driving or whatever) I usually choose Bavaria 0.0 Wit. It's a beer that tastes like it is brewed but it doesn't contain alcohol. If you like hops and have the chance you should try the Bavaria 0,0 Gold. It is far to hoppy for my taste but you might like it. Just, unless you are absolutely sure, stay away from the 0,0 Rose.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:31 am UTC
by jackal
Neil_Boekend wrote:
tsotate wrote:
sfmans wrote:Wow, those guys are seriously drinking the wrong kind of beer.

The kind with hops in it? Because that's what makes beer taste so bad, and it's pretty much required by most definitions of "beer".

Hops are terrible. A bit of it can add to a beer but many beers have far to much hops. Especially small brewers tend to muck up their beer with it, exept for (for example) Belgian Dubbel, Bock. Most of these beers are quite dark with chocolaty tastes and a often a lot sweeter (although a good classic style Bock isn't sweet. That was a recent modification, giving rise to a new type of beer with the name of an old type).

I don't get why hops are all the rage these days--IPAs, double IPAs, etc.

Bitterness is a bad thing. Human tastes evolved to associate "bitter"="bad" because bitter things are often bad, even poisonous, to us. So why on earth people would voluntarily line up to guzzle gallons of beer flavored with intense bitterness is simply beyond me. I might put some minor stock in the theory that everyone is claiming to like IPAs and other hoppy beers out of social pressure (it's a popular craft-brew style these days, and since craft beer=good, then IPA must=good, too, I guess), but that doesn't extend to other variants of beer.

Give me a good stout or hefe any day. I actually don't drink nor crave beer too often, but sometimes nothing tastes as delicious and flavorful as a nice, smooth Guinness...

ETA: even this guy says it's not natural to love hops: http://www.craftbeer.com/craft-beer-mus ... hoppy-beer
ETAA: an interesting read on the history of overly hopped beers from a self-proclaimed hophead: http://www.slate.com/articles/life/drin ... ingle.html

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:40 am UTC
by Yomar
biohazard wrote:
Yomar wrote:I've met people like this in real life. Same for wine, whiskey etc. Yes, you've discovered our secret - we all secretly hate the taste of alcohol, and the thousands of years we've spent developing different varieties of it in cultures across the world is all an effort to find just one variety we can stand so that we can stop pretending. It's not YOU, it's everyone ELSE.


Yeah its clearly not because life was pretty horrible for most of human existence and people wanted to get drunk.


Which requires all of one variety. But let's not pretend this is an argument - on the one hand we've got people saying "I like beer", and on the other hand people saying "You and everyone else in the world are lying, because you cannot possibly like what I don't like". I'm not defending beer, I'm just pointing out how obnoxious those people are.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:42 am UTC
by Wooloomooloo
This comic baffled me, until I remembered it comes from the other side of the pond - that explains it though, it's well known their beer is like making love in a canoe...

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:45 am UTC
by kommunist
Pretending to like beer? Pfft.
Try pretending that you're awake every day for trirty years or so.
Also, now I want beer.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 8:58 am UTC
by Quercus
jackal wrote:I don't get why hops are all the rage these days--IPAs, double IPAs, etc.

Bitterness is a bad thing. Human tastes evolved to associate "bitter"="bad" because bitter things are often bad, even poisonous, to us. So why on earth people would voluntarily line up to guzzle gallons of beer flavored with intense bitterness is simply beyond me. I might put some minor stock in the theory that everyone is claiming to like IPAs and other hoppy beers out of social pressure (it's a popular craft-brew style these days, and since craft beer=good, then IPA must=good, too, I guess), but that doesn't extend to other variants of beer.

Give me a good stout or hefe any day. I actually don't drink nor crave beer too often, but sometimes nothing tastes as delicious and flavorful as a nice, smooth Guinness...

ETA: even this guy says hopheads aren't natural: http://www.craftbeer.com/craft-beer-mus ... hoppy-beer


I love hoppy beers. Like that article says it's probably environmental conditioning, but I can assure you it's genuine enjoyment for me, rather than social pressure - if I'm alone on a Friday evening and want a beer with my meal I'll often reach for an IPA.

I generally enjoy a lot of bitter things - chicory, strong coffee, high cocoa % dark chocolate, the tonic in gin and tonic.

The major taste thing that I can't wrap my head around in other people is how lots of people like everything so sweet. I typically halve the amount of sugar in most desert recipes I make because using the full amount makes me feel nauseous when I eat it. And things like peanut butter with added sugar just blow my mind. Other people must be experiencing the taste of it very differently to me in order for that to seem like a good idea.

I think the general point here is people like/dislike different stuff, and you shouldn't assume that your experience of something matches others experience of it.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 9:11 am UTC
by CharlieP
I find lager highly agreeable and very drinkable (especially on a hot day), but really struggle to drink bitter/real ale/stout/etc. Which I find a genuine shame, as in UK pubs the lager is generally a mix of chemicals I probably don't want to know about mass-produced by a faceless multinational, whereas the proper beer is often hand-crafted with no horrible additives, very low food miles, and little carbon footprint. I'm sure that if I trained myself long and hard enough I could attain a proper appreciation, but since my lifestyle isn't one that involves a lot of time spent in pubs, it doesn't seem like a worthwhile endeavour.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 9:13 am UTC
by jeanrenaud
I think that the reality must be told from someone who's just drinking its first beer of its life. Does you guys can confirm that the first beer you drank was tasting good ? I remember someone telling me "You will get accustomized". I guess that it's the thing girls says to other girls who swallow for the first time... (Let's see if this last sentence will get my reply flagged as inappropriate).

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 9:31 am UTC
by Yomar
jeanrenaud wrote:I think that the reality must be told from someone who's just drinking its first beer of its life. Does you guys can confirm that the first beer you drank was tasting good ? I remember someone telling me "You will get accustomized". I guess that it's the thing girls says to other girls who swallow for the first time... (Let's see if this last sentence will get my reply flagged as inappropriate).

For a lot of people, beer will be the first alcoholic drink they taste (except maybe alcopops and super-sweet cocktails, which don't really count). Those people certainly won't like the taste at first, which is probably why a lot of teenagers and young adults scoff at the idea of drinking anything for the taste and instead just binge drink for the sake of getting drunk. I was acclimated to alcohol in the French style, with small amounts of red wine while I was a kid, so yes, I liked the first beer I drank.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 9:34 am UTC
by Quercus
CharlieP wrote:I find lager highly agreeable and very drinkable (especially on a hot day), but really struggle to drink bitter/real ale/stout/etc. Which I find a genuine shame, as in UK pubs the lager is generally a mix of chemicals I probably don't want to know about mass-produced by a faceless multinational, whereas the proper beer is often hand-crafted with no horrible additives, very low food miles, and little carbon footprint. I'm sure that if I trained myself long and hard enough I could attain a proper appreciation, but since my lifestyle isn't one that involves a lot of time spent in pubs, it doesn't seem like a worthwhile endeavour.

Yeah, it's a shame most lagers commonly available in the UK are poor quality, because IMO a lot of lagers are delicious - particularly dark lagers and Kölsch. German lagers are hard to beat in my opinion.

jeanrenaud wrote:I think that the reality must be told from someone who's just drinking its first beer of its life. Does you guys can confirm that the first beer you drank was tasting good ? I remember someone telling me "You will get accustomized". I guess that it's the thing girls says to other girls who swallow for the first time... (Let's see if this last sentence will get my reply flagged as inappropriate).

No, my first taste of beer was horrible, but I didn't really keep drinking it to get used to it. I just didn't drink beer after that* apart from sips of different ones that other people had ordered to see if there was any style of it which I liked. I found a beer when I was 22 that I genuinely liked (Hoegaarden) and my taste in beer broadened from there. The same thing pretty much happened with wine and Gewürztraminer.

*Never went in for binge drinking for the sake of getting drunk - I hate being drunk and pace myself quite carefully to avoid going over the tipsy-drunk threshold.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 9:49 am UTC
by orthogon
jeanrenaud wrote:I think that the reality must be told from someone who's just drinking its first beer of its life. Does you guys can confirm that the first beer you drank was tasting good ? I remember someone telling me "You will get accustomized". I guess that it's the thing girls says to other girls who swallow for the first time... (Let's see if this last sentence will get my reply flagged as inappropriate).

I was going to say this - I think it's pretty well accepted that nobody likes beer the first time they try it; it's an acquired taste, but once you've acquired the taste you aren't just accustomed to it, you actively love it. The peer pressure and the agreeableness of being drunk are two reasons why most people in pro-alcohol societies end up liking it; but there are plenty of other acquired tastes that don't have either: olives, oysters*, caviar. Probably in all cases it's something about the flavour that rings warning bells, particularly the bitterness=poison response mentioned by jackal, and this has to be overcome. That may be by being forced to eat/drink the thing, by some social expectation that it ought to be delicious, particularly if it's expensive (I guess this is a kind of peer pressure), or by some kind of "gateway" version; a sweet white wine might be a the first step towards liking wine.

For me, the problem with most non-alcoholic drinks is sweetness (I agree with Quercus). I wish there were more savoury/bitter soft drinks available. The closest I've got is tomato juice, but it's quite heavy and you can't drink more than a couple. The alcohol-free beers are getting better: I wish all pubs sold them; possibly there should even be legislation to compel it.

* To tie in with jeanrenaud's comment: I've heard raw oysters compared to a mouthful of semen in terms of both texture and flavour. I only have limited experience of either, but there's something in it.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:04 am UTC
by Quercus
orthogon wrote:For me, the problem with most non-alcoholic drinks is sweetness (I agree with Quercus). I wish there were more savoury/bitter soft drinks available. The closest I've got is tomato juice, but it's quite heavy and you can't drink more than a couple. The alcohol-free beers are getting better: I wish all pubs sold them; possibly there should even be legislation to compel it.

If you're somewhere that will have bitters for cocktails then ask for a dash of bitters in soda. It technically contains alcohol so won't be an option if you need to avoid all alcohol, but the concentration is going to probably be <1% and it's delicious.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:05 am UTC
by CharlieP
orthogon wrote:For me, the problem with most non-alcoholic drinks is sweetness (I agree with Quercus). I wish there were more savoury/bitter soft drinks available. The closest I've got is tomato juice, but it's quite heavy and you can't drink more than a couple. The alcohol-free beers are getting better: I wish all pubs sold them; possibly there should even be legislation to compel it.


Agreed. The last time I briefly abstained from alcohol, it became painfully apparent that particular dishes I like to cook (ones involving pasta and tomato-based sauce) had become inextricably linked with red wine, and it just didn't taste right to eat them with anything else.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:22 am UTC
by SDS
Bitterness is a bad thing. Human tastes evolved to associate "bitter"="bad" because bitter things are often bad, even poisonous, to us.


This just demonstrates the extent to which peoples tastes differ. I tend to find things that are sweet quite boring, unless they have significant sour or bitter notes. And generally, sour and bitter flavours are much more interesting.

I've always understood that humans have an aversion to bitter things at birth, that gradually recedes. This is quite a useful protection from a baby eating something poisonous that they don't recognise - but leaves room for an adult to develop preferences that are a little bit more sophisticated than a babies.

I was going to say this - I think it's pretty well accepted that nobody likes beer the first time they try it; it's an acquired taste, but once you've acquired the taste you aren't just accustomed to it, you actively love it.


Maybe. I don't ever recall disliking it. I was first given beer by a friend, who was clearly trying to get a disgust/surprise reaction out of me, but I remember having a response more along the lines of "ooooh, that's rather nice.".

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:42 am UTC
by Neil_Boekend
CharlieP wrote:
orthogon wrote:For me, the problem with most non-alcoholic drinks is sweetness (I agree with Quercus). I wish there were more savoury/bitter soft drinks available. The closest I've got is tomato juice, but it's quite heavy and you can't drink more than a couple. The alcohol-free beers are getting better: I wish all pubs sold them; possibly there should even be legislation to compel it.


Agreed. The last time I briefly abstained from alcohol, it became painfully apparent that particular dishes I like to cook (ones involving pasta and tomato-based sauce) had become inextricably linked with red wine, and it just didn't taste right to eat them with anything else.

During cooking the alcohol quite soon leaves through the ventilation, although you can get tipsy from breathing that. If you want something wine-like but alcohol free there are many alcohol free wines I haven't tried them myself but since you usually cook the stuff for a while in tomato based pasta sauce I would hazard a guess that the taste is suitable and the lack of alcohol isn't a problem anyway. An alternative is grape juice, around here it's available in most shops. More than alcohol free wine anyway.
Since I don't often drink wine I often forget to buy the wine for a tomato based pasta sauce. Thus I know the wine (or, perhaps, a replacement) greatly enhances the taste of most pasta based dishes.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:43 am UTC
by orthogon
Another thing perhaps worth pointing out is that bitterness and sweetness are proper tastes (detected by the tongue), whereas the flavours that make beer, olives and fishy stuff delicious are smells. My understanding is that we're born with fully developed taste - this helps us to stay alive by eating sugars and avoiding poisons until we can refine our categorisation of foods into good and bad. Smell is something we learn over time as we learn the shapes of the molecules concerned. So there's a physiological basis for acquired taste. [citation needed]

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:55 am UTC
by Neil_Boekend
Indeed. There are only 5 tastes (sweet, sour, bitter, salt and umami). These are sensed with the tongue. All the rest of the flavors are sensed with the nose. "Spicy" is something else, that is signaled by fake cell damage, which is why you can feel it in your eyes and on your genitals.
Therefore, when you have a massive cold everything will taste rather bland, although the tongue is not affected by the cold.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 10:56 am UTC
by LockeZ
All I really want is beer that tastes exactly like Pepsi. And doesn't get me drunk at all.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 11:00 am UTC
by da Doctah
jackal wrote:Bitterness is a bad thing. Human tastes evolved to associate "bitter"="bad" because bitter things are often bad, even poisonous, to us. So why on earth people would voluntarily line up to guzzle gallons of beer flavored with intense bitterness is simply beyond me.


Not a beer person myself, but you're completely off-base when it comes to coffee. I can't understand the point of what most people order with all their sweeteners and whiteners. I buy my coffee in resealable aluminum bottles from Japan, which I keep in the coldest part of the fridge so they're right at the point of freezing. The ingredients on the can read as follows: Water, coffee. Period. End of ingredients list.

As I once said to my then-girlfriend over breakfast at a Howard Johnson's, as she opened her sixth (!) serving of creamer for a single cup of joe: "Vicki, if you wanted a milkshake, why didn't you just order a milkshake?"

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 11:03 am UTC
by FOARP
Assuming this is Randall's actual opinion on beer, for me this puts him the category of people who say that they don't like wine/whisky/tea/coffee/curries etc. Whilst there's a legit reason to say you don't like it, there's always the suspicion that they just haven't spent the time and effort necessary to get into what are (due to complex flavouring and large numbers of varieties) acquired tastes, in which case you're basically denying yourself interesting experiences based on pure laziness and fear of the unknown.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 11:06 am UTC
by LordHorst
"If you don't like it, don't drink it". This. Exactly this. I never had the feeling I had to drink beer just because everyone expects me to. In fact, I didn't start drinking beer or anything that cointains alcohol until I was about 20 (which is quite late, since legal drinking age for beer is 16 where I come from ;) ). I just chose not to drink it and my friends accepted it.

But I kind of get where this comic is coming from. For example I detest sparkling wine. It tastes so awful that I could puke from the taste alone. But somehow everyone else seems to enjoy it? I really cannot believe that... so my guess is that everyone just PRETENDS to like it. :P
Also, I find it quite offending that just about everywhere you are almost forced a glass of sparkling wine... be it the new years party, the office Christmas party or birthday celebrations of co-workers. There's ALWAYS a glass of sparkling wine for me, even though I have stated numerous times that I don't drink sparkling wine. And every time I say: "No thanks" if someone offers me a glass they all act surprised. Even worse: If you have to wait in a restaurant to get seated... what do they offer you? Sparkling wine! And nothing else! At least have the courtesy and offer some orange juice as well. I mean it could very well be that the person waiting to get seated is a recovered alcoholic...

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 11:07 am UTC
by FOARP
"BTW - I'm going to claim that no-one actually likes art, but merely pretends to out of peer pressure. Art is red, and I don't like red.

Same goes for music. Music contains bass, and I don't like bass."


- How people who claim that they don't like beer because its bitter sound to someone who actually does like beer.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 11:18 am UTC
by Quercus
LordHorst wrote:Even worse: If you have to wait in a restaurant to get seated... what do they offer you? Sparkling wine! And nothing else!

That must be a location-specific thing. On the rare occasions I've been offered a drink on the house because I had to wait it's always been a drink of my choice.

Re: 1534: "Beer"

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2015 11:25 am UTC
by Znirk
FOARP wrote:Assuming this is Randall's actual opinion on beer, for me this puts him the category of people who say that they don't like wine/whisky/tea/coffee/curries etc. Whilst there's a legit reason to say you don't like it, there's always the suspicion that they just haven't spent the time and effort necessary to get into what are (due to complex flavouring and large numbers of varieties) acquired tastes, in which case you're basically denying yourself interesting experiences based on pure laziness and fear of the unknown.

However, https://xkcd.com/915/

If you put in the time and effort, you can become proficient in very different activites, like experiencing specific categories of food or drinks. Sure, they're interesting, but focusing one's attention elsewhere is not lazyness.