1572: "xkcd Survey"

This forum is for the individual discussion thread that goes with each new comic.

Moderators: Moderators General, Prelates, Magistrates

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1714
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Quercus » Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:11 pm UTC

Never Eat Cucumber Eat Salmon Sandwiches And Rhubarb Yoghurt

pedanther
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:16 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby pedanther » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:23 pm UTC

I decided not to include "unitory" as a word I knew when I realised I was thinking of "unitary". However, I included "trephony", even though I suspected it wasn't a real word, because that didn't change the fact that I know what it means.

The question about textures and flavours you really dislike missed the two that were a big feature in my childhood: the texture of cooked pumpkin and the flavour of sweet things derived from nuts or stone fruits (marzipan, pistachio ice cream, cherry cola).

threnodyj
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:29 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby threnodyj » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:35 pm UTC

slicedtoad wrote:
Whizbang wrote:Tommorow tomorrow

Also, that list of words has quite a few non-words, right? I can't find any definitions for "Revergent", "Cadine", "Unitory", "Trephony" and "Fination". I'm assuming this is to catch people pretending to know words.


Revergent in Latin means "they will incline towards"... I don't know if that was what was meant by "know", but hey, I knew.

Rowen Morland
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:45 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Rowen Morland » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:48 pm UTC

I know what the dress is but only because of the Xkcd comic. I haven't seen an actual picture of it. How do I answer that question?

LordHorst
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 6:17 am UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby LordHorst » Fri Sep 04, 2015 6:14 am UTC

kasmeneo wrote:
cantab314 wrote:
Plutarch wrote:'Stick-shift,' - that would just be a normal car in the UK.
Meaning I predict a small but measurable correlation between being able to drive a stick-shift and it raining when the person was taking the survey :)

Actually anywhere in Europe, I would say. I had to look it up in the dictionary only to realise he's talking about normal cars. The only time I ever drove one with automatic gear shift was when I had a rental car in the US, that's how rare they are here.


Not exactly "rare", but still not common, I would say... so, that leaves us with "uncommon"?
Anyway, I can't drive a stick-shift "reasonably well". I also cannot drive an automatic car "reasonably well". I cannot drive any car "reasonably well". :(
The solution is simple: I don't own a drivers licence, never had one. :D

User avatar
Eshru
Posts: 145
Joined: Thu Jun 10, 2010 3:51 am UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Eshru » Fri Sep 04, 2015 6:32 am UTC

Locoluis wrote:
Eshru wrote:Shouldn't vacuum be spelt vacwm? Isn't that the point of that letter?


No.

The "uu" in Latin "vacuum" is not a digraph, but two consecutive "u" vowels belonging to separate syllables. It's also distinct from Latin ū (a single long u).

The digraph VV/uu which became the letter W was used in Old High German to represent their /w/ sound, which was spelled Ƿ in Old English. The consonantal sound of the letter V had long since shifted from Classical Latin /w/ to Vulgar Latin /β/ or /v/, so it was no longer usable to write the Germanic /w/ sound.

There was never any reason to write any Latin word with the letter W, because the letters V and U sufficed to write the current consonantal and vowel sound of Latin, respectively.
XKCD, where you can go and make a bad joke about the letter 'double-u' and get an English lesson.

sol_hsa
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2012 8:07 am UTC
Location: Nowhere whenever

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby sol_hsa » Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:26 am UTC

"Type five random words"

Hm.

"I refuse to do so"

GuesssWho
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2015 9:29 am UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby GuesssWho » Fri Sep 04, 2015 8:29 am UTC

Bloopy wrote:I couldn't think of any words I always misspell on the first try off the top of my head. That sort of familiarity would hopefully prevent me from misspelling them! I scrolled through a long list of difficult-to-spell words and picked one that I thought I knew but would've spelled wrong on every try. At least up until I learnt it after a few more attempts just now.

Yeah, I just went with 'than' because I always confuse it with 'then'

I wrote cat. My numbers were 9 (favorite number) and 19 (I'm a Dark Tower fan.) I chose 3 out of 1-5 because it's a powerful magic number that represents birth/life/death and beginning/middle/end; there were three Fates and three Furies and three Gorgons. My animals were cat, dog, snake, spider, bat. I don't remember all my random words, but one of them was cannibal and another was night.

Jeff_UK
Posts: 66
Joined: Sat Nov 03, 2007 10:38 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Jeff_UK » Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:28 am UTC

Yamahako wrote:
kasmeneo wrote:
The concept of the sandwich is attributed to John Montagu (incidentally the 4th Earl of Sandwich


Wow, that's quite a coincidence.
"Please only print this post if you really need to"
...hmm....I wonder how much extra energy is required to generate that request...We need a cost/benefit analysis, STAT!

User avatar
orthogon
Posts: 2899
Joined: Thu May 17, 2012 7:52 am UTC
Location: The Airy 1830 ellipsoid

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby orthogon » Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:49 am UTC

Jeff_UK wrote:
Yamahako wrote:The concept of the sandwich is attributed to John Montagu (incidentally the 4th Earl of Sandwich

Wow, that's quite a coincidence.

Yeah, an even bigger coincidence than Thomas Crapper inventing the flush toilet.

(That article is well worth a read: it claims that not only was there a real plumber and sanitary engineer called Thomas Crapper, but there really is a flush-toilet patent in the name of his nephew, George Crapper).
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

cantab314
Posts: 45
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:03 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby cantab314 » Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:11 am UTC

Flumble wrote:Automatic transmission isn't that rare. There are even emergency vehicles with it –which makes sense, really, because you can keep both hands on the steering wheel and your mind at the traffic. Modern automatic gearboxes are as good as or better than your average (manual transmission!) driver.
In Britain automatic cars aren't rare but drivers who can't drive a manual are rare. If you pass your test on an automatic you can only legally drive an automatic, if you pass your test on a manual you can drive both, so most people learn and take their test in a manual.

gasdive
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:37 am UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby gasdive » Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:45 am UTC

I was desperate to add that after discarding all my socks, replacing them all with dozens of identical pairs and then wearing the same socks for a year, I developed an allergy to the dye. I came out with spots all over my feet and after telling all my friends of the wonders of all identical socks, I had to throw them all out and get a wide variety. I now never wear matched socks.

User avatar
oauitam
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:45 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby oauitam » Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:17 pm UTC

I think it's quite interesting, from a historic perspective, that many people seem to have read the question about which word you often spell wrongly as asking about which word you often type wrongly. I wonder if answers to that question might be pointers to the age of respondents?
Or maybe it's an indicator of the proportion of people today that have a smart-phone in their jacket pockets and not a pen?

User avatar
karhell
Posts: 684
Joined: Wed Jun 19, 2013 4:56 pm UTC
Location: Breizh

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby karhell » Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:22 pm UTC

Do tar flags count as a word for misspelling purposes ?
AluisioASG wrote:191 years ago, the great D. Pedro I drew his sword and said: "Indent thy code or die!"
lmjb1964 wrote:We're weird but it's okay.
ColletArrow, katakissa, iskinner, thunk, GnomeAnne, Quantized, and any other Blitzers, have fun on your journey!

User avatar
Copper Bezel
Posts: 2419
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 6:35 am UTC
Location: Web exclusive!

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Copper Bezel » Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:33 pm UTC

I guess I could imagine people older than me thinking of spelling as having something to do with pens and paper. My word, "accommodate," is one I've had to thirteenth-guess in post boxes and whiteboards equally. But the vast majority of the spelling that I do is through a keyboard. Thus the vast majority of events that I have taken note of that involved spelling happened through a keyboard. It's not really any more complex than that for me.

Sprocket wrote:When you think about stuff on the internet, where do you picture it being physically located? Even if you know it's not really how things work, is there a place you imagine websites and social media posts sitting before you look at them? If so, where is it?
I do a lot of things LIKE this, but this isn't one of them unfortunately. I guess I think of it as being in a few master hard drives somewhere, but that's sort of true.

I kinda want to see the responses to this one. The part of my brain responsible for object permanence and subitizing seems confused on this. The page is definitely a thing that exists right here; my computer has reached out and grabbed it, and it physically exists in the magic plane behind the glass of my monitor. The buttons are physical buttons and the text fields are boxes that my keyboard has the ability to physically insert letters into, though I'd normally not think about that since it's more like thinking at the screen. But most of the devices I use connect to the internet wirelessly in some form, whether that's through a router that I'm aware I set up or through a cell tower I've never seen and don't know the location of. So I also have this conception of the internet itself as this invisible, intangible ether that permeates the outer world, and itself a spatially structured plane, but not organized in any way corresponding with geography and which our little magic mirrors can peep into any point of from any point in the outer world. That's the answer I gave on the survey.
So much depends upon a red wheel barrow (>= XXII) but it is not going to be installed.

she / her / her

User avatar
Whizbang
The Best Reporter
Posts: 2238
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2012 7:50 pm UTC
Location: New Hampshire, USA

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Whizbang » Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:48 pm UTC

The internet, to me, is an amorphous blob just past the upper-right edge of my vision.

User avatar
Angua
Don't call her Delphine.
Posts: 5760
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 12:42 pm UTC
Location: UK/[St. Kitts and] Nevis Occasionally, I migrate to the US for a bit

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Angua » Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:50 pm UTC

Do we know when we're getting the answers to this yet?
Crabtree's bludgeon: “no set of mutually inconsistent observations can exist for which some human intellect cannot conceive a coherent explanation, however complicated”
GNU Terry Pratchett

User avatar
pkcommando
Posts: 530
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 3:22 pm UTC
Location: Allston, MA

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby pkcommando » Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:54 pm UTC

I've always seen the internet as being in a fluffy cloud place like Care-a-lot. Notice that as the internet rose, Care Bears disappeared. Clearly they were evicted to make way for internet construction.
"The Universe is for raptors now!" say Raptors, as they take over all of Universe.

wood.23mark
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:47 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby wood.23mark » Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:59 pm UTC

I found a definition for revergent. It seems legit.
Revergent: a mutation that precisely restores a mutant DNA sequence to a WT DNA sequence


I would reference my source, but this fuzzy AI keeps rejecting my message, calling it an automated commercial process.

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6194
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Jorpho » Fri Sep 04, 2015 2:00 pm UTC

Ahh, I was looking for this. What the comic reminded me of:
ad8-15-1-620x912.jpeg


Courtesy of http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.co ... d-negroes/ .

User avatar
orthogon
Posts: 2899
Joined: Thu May 17, 2012 7:52 am UTC
Location: The Airy 1830 ellipsoid

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby orthogon » Fri Sep 04, 2015 2:32 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:Ahh, I was looking for this. What the comic reminded me of:
[What's your BQ? comic]

Interesting insight into changing social attitudes, yada yada, but more importantly: hey, they had emoji in those days!

Also relevant: Tom Lehrer's possibly finest song, National Brotherhood Week
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

commodorejohn
Posts: 1081
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2009 6:21 pm UTC
Location: Placerville, CA
Contact:

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby commodorejohn » Fri Sep 04, 2015 2:43 pm UTC

Heh, everything else about it seems dead sincere except the list, which made me open up the linked posting just to see if it wasn't actually a MAD spoof...
"'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling."
- Bjarne Stroustrup
www.commodorejohn.com - in case you were wondering, which you probably weren't.

MonkeyMcBean
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 3:00 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby MonkeyMcBean » Fri Sep 04, 2015 3:03 pm UTC

In the keyboard mashing section, I accidentally hit "enter".

This caused the survey to be submitted without the rest of the survey completed. THis is a problem. I expect that there may be many surveys incomplete where the last entry is a little bit of keyboard mashing.

Should I take the survey again?

User avatar
peewee_RotA
Posts: 504
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2011 1:19 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby peewee_RotA » Fri Sep 04, 2015 4:51 pm UTC

Perhaps I'm missing something, but were the results made public yet?
"Vowels have trouble getting married in Canada. They can’t pronounce their O’s."

http://timelesstherpg.wordpress.com/about/

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 4673
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Pfhorrest » Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:25 pm UTC

Jeff_UK wrote:
kasmeneo wrote:The concept of the sandwich is attributed to John Montagu (incidentally the 4th Earl of Sandwich

Wow, that's quite a coincidence.

I thought it was called the sandwich because of the place called Sandwich. Like how a ground beef patty on a split bun was named after Hamburg, or the jelly donut was named after Berlin...
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

commodorejohn
Posts: 1081
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2009 6:21 pm UTC
Location: Placerville, CA
Contact:

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby commodorejohn » Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:32 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:
Jeff_UK wrote:
kasmeneo wrote:The concept of the sandwich is attributed to John Montagu (incidentally the 4th Earl of Sandwich

Wow, that's quite a coincidence.

I thought it was called the sandwich because of the place called Sandwich. Like how a ground beef patty on a split bun was named after Hamburg, or the jelly donut was named after Berlin...

Spoiler:
(That's the joke...)
"'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling."
- Bjarne Stroustrup
www.commodorejohn.com - in case you were wondering, which you probably weren't.

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 4673
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Pfhorrest » Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:34 pm UTC

In conjunction with the line about Crapper (which really is just a coincidence), I thought people were thinking that sandwiches coming from Sandwich was also really just a coincidence.
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

leahjuu
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:40 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby leahjuu » Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:43 pm UTC

I'm not sure if someone has mentioned this - but there is no option to say you don't drive! I'm 26 and have no license. But it's probably fair to say I'm a terrible driver, since I don't do it.

Making surveys is my job, and ours are almost as nonsensical as this one, sometimes.

User avatar
orthogon
Posts: 2899
Joined: Thu May 17, 2012 7:52 am UTC
Location: The Airy 1830 ellipsoid

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby orthogon » Fri Sep 04, 2015 6:06 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:In conjunction with the line about Crapper (which really is just a coincidence), I thought people were thinking that sandwiches coming from Sandwich was also really just a coincidence.

I think we Brits were maybe having a bit of a private joke there and/or assuming too much. Here, everyone knows the story about the Earl of Sandwich inventing the sandwich; but kasmeneo's wording gave the impression, perhaps deliberately, that it was just coincidence that the inventor happened to be the fourth Earl of Sandwich; Jeff_UK then picked up on that, then I tried to subvert it by bringing the Crappers oncle et neveu into it, and ... well you probably had to be there. Y'all have a good Labor day weekend!
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

TranquilFury
Posts: 131
Joined: Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:24 am UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby TranquilFury » Fri Sep 04, 2015 6:09 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:Ahh, I was looking for this. What the comic reminded me of:
ad8-15-1-620x912.jpeg


Courtesy of http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.co ... d-negroes/ .


Hmm, I guess I fail. Or maybe the test fails. Anyway, here are my answers:
A: Wow this is an old quiz, go spiderbro!
B: I don't think all men are created equal. They aren't created, and they certainly don't start out equal(except maybe identical twins, but that's debatable).
C: Sure sounds nice, but people get mad when they aren't allowed to give their own children an unfair advantage.
D: No. I'm unlikely to notice if a new kid joins my neighborhood. If I did, someone would probably accuse me of being a pedophile.

GuesssWho
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2015 9:29 am UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby GuesssWho » Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:09 pm UTC

@orthogon: I love that song! Tom Lehrer was great.

@leahjuu: Me neither, and I have no plan to learn, so I did indeed choose terrible

User avatar
Wildcard
Candlestick!
Posts: 253
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2008 12:42 am UTC
Location: Outside of the box

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Wildcard » Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:52 pm UTC

cellocgw wrote:Talking of strange lists and strange words, how about this:


Are there any words which are their own definition? I thought of "self-explanatory" but that's kind of the opposite.

A word can't define itself; that's silly. "Blue" means "blue." So if you allow circular definitions, then ALL words define themselves.

However, I take it what you meant was, "Are there any words that can accurately be used to describe themselves?" The answer to that is "yes." My favorite example is "sesquipedalian." :)

...And, it looks like Dan H already posted this.
Dan H wrote:
cellocgw wrote:Talking of strange lists and strange words, how about this:


Are there any words which are their own definition? I thought of "self-explanatory" but that's kind of the opposite.

Sesquipedalian is pretty close to its own definition.
There's no such thing as a funny sig.

wood.23mark
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:47 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby wood.23mark » Sat Sep 05, 2015 2:06 am UTC

Hi guys; I found definitions of revergent. I think these are legit; they seem to be the same definition used in two different fields.

revergent:

1. (describing sediment deposits or erosion) the boundary or node where longshore transport budgets change from deposition to erosion.

~ Geormorphology of Desert Environments, ed. A.J. Parsons and A. D. Abrahams

2. a mutation that precisely restores a mutant DNA sequence to a WT (wild type) DNA sequence.

~ reference withheld because of trouble with the forum filters. It's from a biology flashcard series. Still looking for which college and author.

"I read it on the Internet; it must be true."

User avatar
Bloopy
Posts: 211
Joined: Wed May 04, 2011 9:16 am UTC
Location: New Zealand

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Bloopy » Sat Sep 05, 2015 5:08 am UTC

MonkeyMcBean wrote:In the keyboard mashing section, I accidentally hit "enter".

This caused the survey to be submitted without the rest of the survey completed. THis is a problem. I expect that there may be many surveys incomplete where the last entry is a little bit of keyboard mashing.

Should I take the survey again?


Sure. Incomplete surveys will be easy to filter out from the results if anyone wishes to do so. I'd be more concerned about whether we can tell if one person answered the survey dozens of times.

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6194
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Jorpho » Sat Sep 05, 2015 5:27 am UTC

Finally got around to looking up those words just now. I can hardly wait to find out how many people actually picked Peristeronic while not choosing any of the made-up words.

Also, I neglected to mention my other favorite absurdist survey. It seems to have emerged numerous times over the last twenty years; I was unable to find who the true original author was.
http://faculty.plattsburgh.edu/steve.ma ... /NDNH.html

A longer, slightly more interesting version turned up at http://www.frivolity.com/teatime/Surrea ... _marks.txt .

User avatar
orthogon
Posts: 2899
Joined: Thu May 17, 2012 7:52 am UTC
Location: The Airy 1830 ellipsoid

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby orthogon » Sat Sep 05, 2015 11:17 am UTC

Copper Bezel wrote:I guess I could imagine people older than me thinking of spelling as having something to do with pens and paper. My word, "accommodate," is one I've had to thirteenth-guess in post boxes and whiteboards equally. But the vast majority of the spelling that I do is through a keyboard. Thus the vast majority of events that I have taken note of that involved spelling happened through a keyboard. It's not really any more complex than that for me.

If that's your trickiest word, then Accommodating Broccoli in the Cemetery might be for you! I haven't read it myself, but have trouble with all three words. I also can't resist "singularising" broccoli at every opportunity: "is there a broccolo in the fridge?" or "shall I chop up this broccolus"? (Does anybody else actually annoy themselves with these cognitive tics?)

Re typing vs handwriting: spelling is all about using the correct letters in the correct order, but my handwriting has degraded to the point where it can no longer be said to comprise a discrete sequence of specific characters from a finite alphabet, rendering the concept of spelling meaningless.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

xtifr
Posts: 322
Joined: Wed Oct 01, 2008 6:38 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby xtifr » Sat Sep 05, 2015 8:37 pm UTC

The_Alchemist wrote:
eran_rathan wrote:did no one else type 'five random words' when it said to type five random words?

Guess it was just me then. :oops:


No...that's good though. But I did type "cat" - quotes included.


I not only included the quotes; I also followed it with 'here' (not in quotes) and a colon.

Basically, I wanted to make the data as interesting as possible, and provide as many opportunities for strange correlations as possible. In the case of five random words, I figured that actually entering five random words would provide way more opportunities to find strange correlations, but in the case of 'type "cat" here:', the opportunities for odd correlations would be minimal unless I did something off the beaten trail.

(edit) other notes:

The frequently misspelled word one was hard for me, because when I notice that I'm having trouble with a word, I make a point of coming up with a mnemonic device to help myself. So the first dozen or so examples I came up with were all words I used to have trouble spelling. It took me a long time (read: I had to take a break and go do something else for a while) before I could think of something that fit. (No, I don't remember what it was, sorry).

On the do-you-know-these-words list, there was only one (regolith) where I knew for sure that it was a word, but couldn't remember the definition. So I didn't check it.

On the Myers-Briggs thing: I wanted to answer "I'm not really into Pokémon", but that wasn't an option. :evil:
"[T]he author has followed the usual practice of contemporary books on graph theory, namely to use words that are similar but not identical to the terms used in other books on graph theory."
-- Donald Knuth, The Art of Computer Programming, Vol I, 3rd ed.

samorost1
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Sep 05, 2015 9:11 pm UTC

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby samorost1 » Sat Sep 05, 2015 9:15 pm UTC

peregrine_crow wrote:Spelled my word (necessary) correctly.

That was mine, too. Had to look it up. :/

(I've got a digit attached to my username, because I was not smart enough to click on the right option to make me old enough for this forum without FAXING my parents' permission (I lol'd hard, but there was actually no number))

User avatar
Copper Bezel
Posts: 2419
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 6:35 am UTC
Location: Web exclusive!

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Copper Bezel » Sat Sep 05, 2015 10:31 pm UTC

Aw, man, the Myers-Briggs question really did need a write-in. That would have been awesome.

orthogon wrote:
Copper Bezel wrote:I guess I could imagine people older than me thinking of spelling as having something to do with pens and paper. My word, "accommodate," is one I've had to thirteenth-guess in post boxes and whiteboards equally. But the vast majority of the spelling that I do is through a keyboard. Thus the vast majority of events that I have taken note of that involved spelling happened through a keyboard. It's not really any more complex than that for me.

If that's your trickiest word, then Accommodating Broccoli in the Cemetery might be for you! I haven't read it myself, but have trouble with all three words.

It's tempting to check out. Thanks. = ]

I also can't resist "singularising" broccoli at every opportunity: "is there a broccolo in the fridge?" or "shall I chop up this broccolus"? (Does anybody else actually annoy themselves with these cognitive tics?)

Oh, endlessly. My sense of humor is is 99% filtering. Or maybe just filters 99%, so the bad puns and intentional "cute" errors that get through are the top 1% of what my subconscious is inflicting on me.
So much depends upon a red wheel barrow (>= XXII) but it is not going to be installed.

she / her / her

kelly_holden
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:27 am UTC
Location: Rural New South Wales

Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby kelly_holden » Sat Sep 05, 2015 10:54 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:
Copper Bezel wrote:I guess I could imagine people older than me thinking of spelling as having something to do with pens and paper. My word, "accommodate," is one I've had to thirteenth-guess in post boxes and whiteboards equally. But the vast majority of the spelling that I do is through a keyboard. Thus the vast majority of events that I have taken note of that involved spelling happened through a keyboard. It's not really any more complex than that for me.

If that's your trickiest word, then Accommodating Broccoli in the Cemetery might be for you! I haven't read it myself, but have trouble with all three words. I also can't resist "singularising" broccoli at every opportunity: "is there a broccolo in the fridge?" or "shall I chop up this broccolus"? (Does anybody else actually annoy themselves with these cognitive tics?)

Re typing vs handwriting: spelling is all about using the correct letters in the correct order, but my handwriting has degraded to the point where it can no longer be said to comprise a discrete sequence of specific characters from a finite alphabet, rendering the concept of spelling meaningless.

But surely if there is such as thing as a "broccolus" or a "broccolo", it would be one of the tiny flowers? Since that's what the head is composed of?


Return to “Individual XKCD Comic Threads”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 27 guests