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Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 5:19 pm UTC
by Quizatzhaderac
Image

Title text: Don't worry--you're less likely to die from a space launch than from a shark attack. The survival rate is pretty high for both!

When you get to space and meet a lightning shark, remember that the fatality rate is no higher than the heat death of the universe, and nobody has died of that!

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 5:41 pm UTC
by x7eggert
A shark with a can opener would suffice.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 5:58 pm UTC
by solune
I'm interested in the choice of the rocket design. We know that Randall is knowledgable about rockets, so it's probably not random. As far as I know, it doesn't match any of the existing human-rated model or any that is in active development.
Despite the three engines being drawn the same size, the perspective makes it look like a larger central core with 3 or 4 solid fuel boosters

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 7:33 pm UTC
by pogrmman
solune wrote:I'm interested in the choice of the rocket design. We know that Randall is knowledgable about rockets, so it's probably not random. As far as I know, it doesn't match any of the existing human-rated model or any that is in active development.
Despite the three engines being drawn the same size, the perspective makes it look like a larger central core with 3 or 4 solid fuel boosters

At a first, not so close glance, it reminded me of a Soyuz. It’s definitely not one, though it could have liquid boosters like a Soyuz.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 7:43 pm UTC
by Soupspoon
I was thinking it was a Falcon Heavy with man-rated Dragon (2?) atop, still slightly in the future.

But they don't use oblique/centre-hugging booster-top fairings (more seen in older Soviet stacks (ninjaed!)) and you're right that we're probably looking at a symmetry-3 booster set.

But it's a fairly common setup in any KSP-alike. (I've been playing about with such an Android rocket simulator today, by coincidence. Trying to build up a huge framework of docked rocket-cores in orbit. But the simpler nature of being 2D orbits is offset by the trickier control system, without the handiness of KSP's forward projection/intersection.)

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:22 pm UTC
by qvxb
Ground Control: Don't get upset Major Tom. I just thought you might be interested in this oddity.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 3:00 am UTC
by StClair
If you're on Apollo 12, you can do both!

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 12:04 pm UTC
by cellocgw
INB4 -- Failure to Launch?

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 9:09 pm UTC
by ElWanderer
pogrmman wrote:
solune wrote:I'm interested in the choice of the rocket design...

At a first, not so close glance, it reminded me of a Soyuz. It’s definitely not one, though it could have liquid boosters like a Soyuz.

To me it looks quite like a Soyuz with the liquid boosters replaced by Proton fuel tanks... but then it is more "rocket doodle" than anything else! I say that having doodled a lot of rockets of various designs whilst bored.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 10:22 pm UTC
by rabidmuskrat
you're less likely to die from a space launch than from a shark attack.


Cause, y'know, everything else about space travel aside from the launch is perfectly simple and safe.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2019 11:37 pm UTC
by Sableagle
rabidmuskrat wrote:
you're less likely to die from a space launch than from a shark attack.


Cause, y'know, everything else about space travel aside from the launch is perfectly simple and safe.


Things like this are really very rare in any area as small as this spaceship, after all.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 1:33 am UTC
by ijuin
rabidmuskrat wrote:
you're less likely to die from a space launch than from a shark attack.


Cause, y'know, everything else about space travel aside from the launch is perfectly simple and safe.


100% of spaceflight deaths to date have happened either during the launch phase or the entry/landing phase. Nobody has yet died in space “proper” (i.e. above the Karman line).

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:58 am UTC
by toni2068
the reason this comic exists is because randall wanted to have a countdown from 20, just so he could sneak in "20..19.." in this, the year 2019.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:37 pm UTC
by Quizatzhaderac
x7eggert wrote:A shark with a can opener would suffice.
How would a regular shark breath in space? There's no air 'n space!

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 1:38 am UTC
by ijuin
Sharks don’t breathe air anyway. They breathe water. There is no liquid water in space.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 3:01 am UTC
by Soupspoon
They have to keep moving forward, as well. Or they undergo vertical re-entry.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 7:41 pm UTC
by rabidmuskrat
ijuin wrote:
rabidmuskrat wrote:
you're less likely to die from a space launch than from a shark attack.


Cause, y'know, everything else about space travel aside from the launch is perfectly simple and safe.


or the entry/landing phase


Right, so died during something other than the launch.

Re: 2107: "Launch risk"

Posted: Sat Mar 23, 2019 1:38 pm UTC
by x7eggert
ijuin wrote:Sharks don’t breathe air anyway. They breathe water. There is no liquid water in space.


There is a lot (as earth is in space).

If you have a bubble of water, the outside will freeze by evaporation and you get a sealed bubble (thus you need a sufficiently large bubble to begin with).

The human space suit are cooled by having a porous membrane between water and space, and the ice will clog the pores until the body heat will melt the ice.

Soupspoon wrote:They have to keep moving forward, as well. Or they undergo vertical re-entry.


Many (or most?) shark species don't need to keep swimming:
"While at rest, most sharks pump water over their gills to ensure a constant supply of oxygenated water. A small number of species have lost the ability to pump water through their gills and must swim without rest." (Wikipedia)