0727: "Trade Expert"

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DVC
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DVC » Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:43 pm UTC

Diadem wrote:
uncivlengr wrote:
Diadem wrote:Classically, letters were not written individually, but glued together. This is rapidly going out of vogue with the rise of typwriters and computers, but that's nevertheless how people used to write.
"Classically", slashes are not letters, and are written individually, just like numbers, other symbols, and punctuation.

If you wrote "one/two" cursively, you would link the "/" with the letters? That's not proper cursive writing, I have no idea what you're going on about.

No, of course not.

My example about cursive writing was to demonstrate that writing from the bottom up is quite normal, and is in fact how people used to write. You write from the left to the right and start at the bottom, in cursive script. Therefore a slash, which starts at the bottom and goes to the right, is indeed a forward slash, while a backslash is a backward one. So the names make sense. That was my point.


I don't start a single hand written character from the bottom; they are all from the top. I believe that was the point. Slash and backslash used to confuse me for this reason. Then I stopped calling it a slash and started calling it a solidus and I stopped being confused; unfortunately that has left everyone else confused (except English majors, but they rarely use computers).

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Anski » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:21 pm UTC

This really gets me too. My local college radio station constantly says backslash in their programs and ads. At first it was just a few, but soon enough everyone was saying "backslash" on-air. I ended up sending them an email basically saying that I figured college level students would know the difference between a slash and a backslash, and that they were an embarrassment to the community if they didn't.

I think they ended up changing it, but I don't really know. I stopped listening to the station because they started to constantly play screemo music.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby pandroid » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:36 pm UTC

DVC wrote:
Diadem wrote:
uncivlengr wrote:
Diadem wrote:Classically, letters were not written individually, but glued together. This is rapidly going out of vogue with the rise of typwriters and computers, but that's nevertheless how people used to write.
"Classically", slashes are not letters, and are written individually, just like numbers, other symbols, and punctuation.

If you wrote "one/two" cursively, you would link the "/" with the letters? That's not proper cursive writing, I have no idea what you're going on about.

No, of course not.

My example about cursive writing was to demonstrate that writing from the bottom up is quite normal, and is in fact how people used to write. You write from the left to the right and start at the bottom, in cursive script. Therefore a slash, which starts at the bottom and goes to the right, is indeed a forward slash, while a backslash is a backward one. So the names make sense. That was my point.


I don't start a single hand written character from the bottom; they are all from the top. I believe that was the point. Slash and backslash used to confuse me for this reason. Then I stopped calling it a slash and started calling it a solidus and I stopped being confused; unfortunately that has left everyone else confused (except English majors, but they rarely use computers).


I created an account just to agree with this. I start every character at the top. The only people I know who use cursive are my grandparents. To me, slash and backslash have always seemed like they were named wrong, but since I'm not a newscaster, it hasn't affected my life much.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DragonHawk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:38 pm UTC

freddyfish wrote:URI? did he mean URL? or am I just missing something

URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) are technically a subset of URIs (Uniform Resource Identifiers). Normally, only the highly pedantic care. To make this even more stupid, most URIs don't use slashes in their syntax (although it's possible). It's URLs that must have slashes.

Explanation:

URLs identify where something is, and how to retrieve it.

URNs (Uniform Resource Names) are also URIs. URNs identify what something is, uniquely.

As an analogy, a Social Security Number uniquely identifies a person, but doesn't tell you where to find them. That's like a URN. A street address gives you a location, but doesn't necessarily promise that a given person will be there. That's like a URL.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby FourTael » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:40 pm UTC

All that needs to be said about this comic is this:

THANK YOU

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby NewtonLied » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:44 pm UTC

lordatog wrote:I've gotta admit, the distinction between slashes and backslashes has always seemed completely backwards to me. Naturally, when writing a slash, you start at the top and go down. So... a regular slash starts at the top and goes backwards from there, while a backslash starts at the top and goes forward. So counterintuitive.


Forget the wands and the thrones. It's the direction that slash would fall if there were gravity.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby XerxesQados » Wed Apr 14, 2010 3:52 pm UTC

defleopard98 wrote:One of the worst examples of this is my computer programming teacher at my school. She claims to have been using JavaScript and Web stuff "forever", but she can't even remember when to use back-slashes vs. slashes. She even typed in a URL with back-slashes and wondered why it wasn't working for a couple minutes.


High school teacher, right?

Has anyone ever had a middle-or-high school computer teacher who was not grossly incompetent? (I"m actually curious; if someone has, please tell me)
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DragonHawk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:01 pm UTC

XerxesQados wrote:Has anyone ever had a middle-or-high school computer teacher who was not grossly incompetent?

My high school computer teacher was one of the best school teachers I ever had.

He didn't know everything (who does?), but he knew what he was teaching, and he knew what he didn't know. When I demonstrated I already knew the regular coursework and more, he put me on an independent study with Pascal. He didn't know that nearly as well as he knew the regular coursework, but he was still able to help me figure out a few things. He was also a genuinely nice guy.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby cparker15 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:12 pm UTC

I guess I'm an oddball. I start backslashes at the top and slashes at the bottom. If I were to put a backslash and slash next to each other, I would write them like a V or a checkmark with a space in the middle: \ /

As far as I know, everyone I know writes these two characters the same way: left-to-right.

XerxesQados wrote:Has anyone ever had a middle-or-high school computer teacher who was not grossly incompetent? (I"m actually curious; if someone has, please tell me)

My high school programming instructor taught me C++, the beginnings of Java, and helped me start learning Perl. He was brilliant. He helped prepare me for the rest of my life.

The multimedia instructor, on the other hand, would have said "backslash" for a URL, and part of that class was Web page design, which included writing HTML. I cannot count the number of times someone would do something like <\a> and wonder why it wasn't working. People kept coming to me for help instead of the instructor. I eventually had to more or less take over. ... Thanks for surfacing those memories. :| :( :x :evil: :twisted:
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Kayangelus » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:34 pm UTC

I have seen people mention that the backslash is never used outside of computers.

Which raises an interesting question, because in my "abstract math" class, we are covering the basics of set theory. And we use the notation A\B to represent a set of all objects in A that are not in B.

Now my question is, is my math textbook wrong? Or were people just generalizing?

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby rantingnerd » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:44 pm UTC

We just had a discussion at work about how "[forward] slash" and "backslash" are really dumb names -- they assume a particular starting point for drawing the slash, which won't necessarily hold between cultural traditions, or even within them. (I.e. "upslash" and "downslash" don't help much.) Also, "slash" is American English; "stroke" is British English for the same punctuation mark (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slash_(punctuation)).

My suggestion is to use northeast/southwest and northwest/southeast, as being incredibly unambiguous, i.e. "neslash" and "seslash" -- they're even pronunceable!

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby ritvax » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:45 pm UTC

I also don't care for when people start every web address with "dub-dub-dub."

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby mikekearn » Wed Apr 14, 2010 5:00 pm UTC

I did this for years before someone corrected me, precisely because I made the terrible assumption that professionals on television would know what the hell they were talking about. I have since learned otherwise.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Rilian » Wed Apr 14, 2010 5:07 pm UTC

how do you write a division in mathematics? Do you star the horizontal bar at the right or the left? I've never seen anyone start it at the right.
I start it at the right, because it's easier.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Exüberance » Wed Apr 14, 2010 5:17 pm UTC

When you really think about it, some character names really do sound pretty violent!

#!/bin/bash
HASH BANG SLASH bin SLASH BASH!!

Well, okay 'hash' doesn't quite work but it still sort of sounds violent.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Zrana » Wed Apr 14, 2010 5:27 pm UTC

pandroid wrote:
DVC wrote:
Diadem wrote:
uncivlengr wrote:
Diadem wrote:Classically, letters were not written individually, but glued together. This is rapidly going out of vogue with the rise of typwriters and computers, but that's nevertheless how people used to write.
"Classically", slashes are not letters, and are written individually, just like numbers, other symbols, and punctuation.

If you wrote "one/two" cursively, you would link the "/" with the letters? That's not proper cursive writing, I have no idea what you're going on about.

No, of course not.

My example about cursive writing was to demonstrate that writing from the bottom up is quite normal, and is in fact how people used to write. You write from the left to the right and start at the bottom, in cursive script. Therefore a slash, which starts at the bottom and goes to the right, is indeed a forward slash, while a backslash is a backward one. So the names make sense. That was my point.


I don't start a single hand written character from the bottom; they are all from the top. I believe that was the point. Slash and backslash used to confuse me for this reason. Then I stopped calling it a slash and started calling it a solidus and I stopped being confused; unfortunately that has left everyone else confused (except English majors, but they rarely use computers).


I created an account just to agree with this. I start every character at the top. The only people I know who use cursive are my grandparents. To me, slash and backslash have always seemed like they were named wrong, but since I'm not a newscaster, it hasn't affected my life much.


I start new letters/characters at the top the vast majority of the time, so I'm also joing this came for how to right a slash. Sure, alot of cursive letters start at the bottom, but that's because they are connected to the letter in front of them. I certainly don't start a lower case 'a' when writing 'and' at the bottom. The natural angle of writing will give the slash it's slant without having to think to much about it anyways. A backslant though would be me trying to write towards my my palm instead of along side my thumb and thus feels a little more awkward. That, and starting a brand new bit of writing from the bottom up sometimes results in a broken mechanical pencil lead, sort of similar to why calligraphy pens need to start at the top--they snag on the paper otherwise.

Calligraphy pens, dip ink well pens. I think those are the answer to the argument about starting from the top or not in the past. Sure connected letters start from the bottom, but I strongly suspect there would be difficulting starting an unconnected character that way.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby airshowfan » Wed Apr 14, 2010 5:58 pm UTC

I'm with memcginn. I don't really keep track of which one is called "slash" and which one is called "backslash". When typing out a URL I write "/" (whatever that's called), and when going into Windows directories I type "\" (whatever that's called). Whenever people say "slash" or "backslash", I know which of the two they mean, so I never bother to remember which is which (especially since the names used are inconsistent, as this comic points out).

I like phlip's explanation, though. Maybe I'll remember from now on. And Newtonlied's way of remembering is even more elegant!

As for the topic in general... Anyone who knows anything about anything gets mad at newscasters and journalists for getting it wrong whenever the topic comes up in the news. If you're already informed about some topic, then news about that topic are not written with you in mind.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DragonHawk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 6:10 pm UTC

Arguing over which way (top-to-bottom vs bottom-to-top) is the "correct" way to draw a slash is quite possibly the lamest thing since arguing over which end of the egg to break first.
-----
Kayangelus wrote:I have seen people mention that the backslash is never used outside of computers

Computer keyboards were generally don't have characters which don't exist outside of computers, because there would be no reason to invent a character and put it on a key just for the hell of it.
-----
Exüberance wrote:#!/bin/bash
HASH BANG SLASH bin SLASH BASH!!
Well, okay 'hash' doesn't quite work but it still sort of sounds violent.

"Pound" is a common name for the '#' character. So: "pound bang slash bin slash bash". Suitably violent.

It now seems appropriate to mention the classic:

Code: Select all

find; gawk; talk; flex; touch; grep; finger; unzip; head; tail; mount; fsck; yes; gasp; fsck; more; yes; yes; eject; umount; make clean; zip; split; done; exit
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby keiranhalcyon31 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 6:29 pm UTC

phlip wrote:
keiranhalcyon31 wrote:Every time you say "URI", I die a little. "BCE", too.

BCE I won't argue with... it's a non-solution to a questionable problem.

But what's your problem with URI? URLs are a subset of URIs. URIs are strings in a certain format that identify resources... URLs are URIs that contain information on how to actually get that resource (like the hostname in a HTTP URL). They're different things, which deserve different terms.


This:

Rilian wrote:What's a uri? It's my friend's name....


Also, I grew up with the term "URL", so "URI" just sounds dumb to my ears.

Also also, I looked them up, and I'm having a hard time groking the difference. Specifically, I'm having a hard time picturing a web URI that isn't also a valid web URL.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Edrees » Wed Apr 14, 2010 6:35 pm UTC

The alt text really did it for me..hahahahah..love it.

also

Image

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby ftarp » Wed Apr 14, 2010 7:20 pm UTC

DragonHawk wrote:
Kayangelus wrote:I have seen people mention that the backslash is never used outside of computers

Computer keyboards were generally don't have characters which don't exist outside of computers, because there would be no reason to invent a character and put it on a key just for the hell of it.

Image

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Thesh » Wed Apr 14, 2010 7:30 pm UTC

NewtonLied wrote:
lordatog wrote:I've gotta admit, the distinction between slashes and backslashes has always seemed completely backwards to me. Naturally, when writing a slash, you start at the top and go down. So... a regular slash starts at the top and goes backwards from there, while a backslash starts at the top and goes forward. So counterintuitive.


Forget the wands and the thrones. It's the direction that slash would fall if there were gravity.


A forward slash falls to the right, a backslash falls to the left. I don't know of any character that falls forward... Maybe if you were viewing the screen from an angle or were looking at it in 3D, but whether it falls forward or back would depend on where you are looking from. I say we fix windows and rename them to slash and escape... And then rename the escape key to something else.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby RebeccaRGB » Wed Apr 14, 2010 7:45 pm UTC

ftarp wrote:
DragonHawk wrote:
Kayangelus wrote:I have seen people mention that the backslash is never used outside of computers

Computer keyboards were generally don't have characters which don't exist outside of computers, because there would be no reason to invent a character and put it on a key just for the hell of it.

(picture of command key)

That's not a character key though. That's a modifier key. And the symbol wasn't invented just for the hell of it; the need for a key reserved for commands existed long before the character for it did. On the Apple II and the Lisa, this key just had the Apple logo on it. It wasn't until the Macintosh that they used the cloverleaf symbol. The symbol's proper name is PLACE OF INTEREST SIGN and it originates from a Swedish trail map. So, in fact, it does exist outside of computers.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DragonHawk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 8:10 pm UTC

keiranhalcyon31 wrote:Also also, I looked them up, and I'm having a hard time groking the difference. Specifically, I'm having a hard time picturing a web URI that isn't also a valid web URL.


URLs are a proper subset of URIs. (Apples are a proper subset of fruit.)

All URLs are also URIs, but not all URIs are URLs. (All apples are fruit, but not all fruit are apples.)

Some URIs are URNs. URNs are not URLs. (Some fruit are oranges. Oranges are not apples.)

An example of a URN:

Code: Select all

urn:isbn:0451450523


That is not a URL, since it doesn't tell you where to get the book. It is, however, a URI.

The terminology invented for these things is rather confusing.
-----
ftarp wrote:
DragonHawk wrote:Computer keyboards were generally don't have characters which don't exist outside of computers, because there would be no reason to invent a character and put it on a key just for the hell of it.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3097/2299539595_8c69e09b11.jpg


Touché. But that's not quite the same thing. That's not a character one can type.

But still, you're right, technically, one could invent symbols solely for computer use, and then create a keyboard which had keys for them. Indeed, it has been done. I give you the space-cadet keyboard. There's a reason it failed to catch on. :-)
-----
Thesh wrote: And then rename the escape key to something else.

Great, so make the problem worse! :-D
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby finlay » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:18 pm UTC

DragonHawk wrote:"Pound" is a common name for the '#' character. So: "pound bang slash bin slash bash". Suitably violent.

Again there's a difference between British and American usage, because the pound sign for us is £, of course. On a British keyboard, £ is shift+3 and # has its own key... On the mac, the US keyboard has # as shift+3 and £ as alt+3; they're reversed on the mac's British keyboard, which is basically completely different from most other keyboards sold in this country and almost exactly the same as a US keyboard.... Anyway I think if I ever call up a hotline in America I'll be a bit confused when they say, "Press the pound key," and would be a bit more confused if I didn't already know this little titbit...

As for 'slash', it's always been called that here, and as I say, they used to specify forward slash on TV (dunno if they still do because I don't watch TV any more). But you might also hear stroke, and it's common for Londonderry/Derry in Northern Ireland to be called Stroke City because they can't agree what name to call it. And my headteacher (principal :P) once called it a solidus in an assembly (IIRC, again it's been years), which confused the hell out of me.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Pesto » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:30 pm UTC

I'm constantly mixing up slash and backslash. If I had a nickel for every time I've written a new line as "/n" I'd be rich.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Mooglefrooglian » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:33 pm UTC

I start my slashes from the top and go to the bottom.

I thought everyone did it, guess not.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Briareos » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:38 pm UTC

DragonHawk wrote:
Exüberance wrote:#!/bin/bash
HASH BANG SLASH bin SLASH BASH!!
Well, okay 'hash' doesn't quite work but it still sort of sounds violent.

"Pound" is a common name for the '#' character. So: "pound bang slash bin slash bash". Suitably violent.
I've never heard it (that is, the "#!" combination) called anything but "shebang."
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Splarka » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:49 pm UTC

Anyone else remember when some browsers (IE 3 era I believe) wouldn't autoescape or autocorrect backslashes? You could phish them with a user@longip/file URL like:

Code: Select all

http://www.securesite.gov\trustytrusttrust@123456789/virus.asp

...good times.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Eebster the Great » Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:15 pm UTC

Kayangelus wrote:I have seen people mention that the backslash is never used outside of computers.

Which raises an interesting question, because in my "abstract math" class, we are covering the basics of set theory. And we use the notation A\B to represent a set of all objects in A that are not in B.

Now my question is, is my math textbook wrong? Or were people just generalizing?


I would guess, based on pure speculation, that the symbol originally used for this did initially resemble a backslash, in order to be the reverse of a horizontal fraction bar (by the way, both | and / have historically been used for fractions). However, it was not recognized as an actual punctuation mark any more than the integral symbol is. The punctuation mark was not introduced until 1960, for the express purpose of computer programming (the justification I find hilarious; it was used so you could type things like /\ (and) and \/ (or)). Note that backslash is NOT an ASCII character, and that it did not exist (at least in its current form) before computers.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Doodle77 » Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:30 pm UTC

The use of the backslash as a directory separator was the worst thing ever to come out of Microsoft.

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Hectamatatortron » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:03 pm UTC

I rarely watch the news because of complete failures like this and all the unnecessary pessimism, but the other day it happened to be on and I distinctly heard a web address being reported as containing a backslash.

Needless to say it drove me nuts. And I guess the effect lasted because I logged in just to rant about it!

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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby squareroot » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:04 pm UTC

I once heard a man who would read, for instance, "forums.xkcd.com/posting.php" as "forums dot xkcd dot com sub posting dot php". He always calls slashes, back or otherwise, "sub". It's weird, but it's certainly effective in making you remember to put a slash in the uri instead of a period.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby RebeccaRGB » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:30 pm UTC

squareroot wrote:I once heard a man who would read, for instance, "forums.xkcd.com/posting.php" as "forums dot xkcd dot com sub posting dot php". He always calls slashes, back or otherwise, "sub". It's weird, but it's certainly effective in making you remember to put a slash in the uri instead of a period.

http colon sub sub dub dub dub :wink:
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Kaijyuu » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:48 pm UTC

Outside of radio, I can't imagine why anyone would ever try to say a web address. Just write it out and avoid this whole mess.
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DVC » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:50 pm UTC

Thesh wrote:A forward slash falls to the right, a backslash falls to the left. I don't know of any character that falls forward... Maybe if you were viewing the screen from an angle or were looking at it in 3D, but whether it falls forward or back would depend on where you are looking from. I say we fix windows and rename them to slash and escape... And then rename the escape key to something else.


A "P" falls forward, it's got all its weight over the front!

DragonHawk wrote:URLs are a proper subset of URIs. (Apples are a proper subset of fruit.)

All URLs are also URIs, but not all URIs are URLs. (All apples are fruit, but not all fruit are apples.)


It may interest you to know that in Old Norse (which became English), apple meant all fruit. Later the word apple was marginalised for trendier words. As late as 17c. any of the various spellings of apple could be a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts.

Doodle77 wrote:The use of the backslash as a directory separator was the worst thing ever to come out of Microsoft.


Really? THE worst thing?
Last edited by DVC on Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:53 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

Mr. Mashadar
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby Mr. Mashadar » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:51 pm UTC

I've got another one along this line that irks me, web sites vs. web pages.

I've been listening to Georgia Public Broadcasting on my ride home from work for about a year now and I usually enjoy their programing. It is GPB's habit to create web pages about specific events that are happening in the state (e.g. They have one dedicated to covering the legislation that's being dealt with each session in GA's legislative bodies). This is a fine thing and I'm all for it. What I am not for is the lady who announces the posting of these web pages, for she insists on calling them web sites. To use the above example she would say, "To learn more about this topic, please visit our special web site at gpb.org/galegislature." And yes, she does, most of the time, say backslash as well.

Her name is Rickey Bevington and I've written her two very cordial emails asking her to correct this continuing mistake. The first was a short and polite request. The second included a Summer Glauesque explaination of the differences between a web site and a web page. Mrs. Bevington has roundly ignored both emails.

Thus I have taken it upon myself to volunteer to answer phones at their Membership Drive tomorrow night. A commitment which GPB has, in another announcement delivered by Mrs. Bevington, promised to reward me by granting the opportunity to meet my adversary face to face.

I wish I were kidding.

-Mr. Mashadar

P.S. If you call in to donate and mention this post, I will see if I can't get them to send you a tee shirt or coffee mug or something extra.

DVC
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DVC » Wed Apr 14, 2010 11:56 pm UTC

Mr. Mashadar wrote:I've got another one along this line that irks me, web sites vs. web pages.

I've been listening to Georgia Public Broadcasting on my ride home from work for about a year now and I usually enjoy their programing. It is GPB's habit to create web pages about specific events that are happening in the state (e.g. They have one dedicated to covering the legislation that's being dealt with each session in GA's legislative bodies). This is a fine thing and I'm all for it. What I am not for is the lady who announces the posting of these web pages, for she insists on calling them web sites. To use the above example she would say, "To learn more about this topic, please visit our special web site at gpb.org/galegislature." And yes, she does, most of the time, say backslash as well.

Her name is Rickey Bevington and I've written her two very cordial emails asking her to correct this continuing mistake. The first was a short and polite request. The second included a Summer Glauesque explaination of the differences between a web site and a web page. Mrs. Bevington has roundly ignored both emails.

Thus I have taken it upon myself to volunteer to answer phones at their Membership Drive tomorrow night. A commitment which GPB has, in another announcement delivered by Mrs. Bevington, promised to reward me by granting the opportunity to meet my adversary face to face.

I wish I were kidding.

-Mr. Mashadar

P.S. If you call in to donate and mention this post, I will see if I can't get them to send you a tee shirt or coffee mug or something extra.


You Sir, are my hero.

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DragonHawk
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby DragonHawk » Thu Apr 15, 2010 12:40 am UTC

Briareos wrote:
DragonHawk wrote:
Exüberance wrote:#!/bin/bash
HASH BANG SLASH bin SLASH BASH!!
Well, okay 'hash' doesn't quite work but it still sort of sounds violent.

"Pound" is a common name for the '#' character. So: "pound bang slash bin slash bash". Suitably violent.
I've never heard it (that is, the "#!" combination) called anything but "shebang."

Right, right, the *combination* is called "shebang". But we were naming each character individually in order to emphasize the violence inherit in the system.
-----
Eebster the Great wrote:The punctuation mark was not introduced until 1960, for the express purpose of computer programming ...

Citation needed. I've been casually and cursorily researching the history of the backslash since soon after this thread started. I have found no hard evidence for or against its existence prior to the advent computing. I found one poorly-sourced mention that it existed on a teletype c. 1940. If correct, that would imply it was around before programming, but again, it's so poorly sourced I'm not putting much stock in it.

Eebster the Great wrote:Note that backslash is NOT an ASCII character ...

Um, that's just plain wrong. ASCII code 92 (decimal) is the backslash. According to unofficial sources I find with Google, the original (1963) ASCII spec put backslash at that same position.
Last edited by DragonHawk on Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:50 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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exoren22
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Re: “Trade Expert” discussion

Postby exoren22 » Thu Apr 15, 2010 12:51 am UTC

Rilian wrote:
phlip wrote:I can accept a handwritten backslash... especially if it was written by a leftie. ...


Erm. I'm left-handed and I write /. I don't see why handedness would affect it.



Me, too. And I feel the same.


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