0989: "Cryogenics"

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cream wobbly
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby cream wobbly » Mon Dec 12, 2011 4:15 pm UTC

Stick lady proves my point that electronics stores are selling us "the future, today!" -- simply by selling obsolete, redundant, and slow technology from six years ago. You could waste your money by buying something more expensive and top-of-the-line, but in six years' time, it will be then what the mainstream is now.

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cellocgw
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby cellocgw » Mon Dec 12, 2011 6:12 pm UTC

VoronX wrote:Am I the only one this reminds of Vernor Vinge's Marooned in Realtime?
I've never seen this subject explored in such an extreme manner elsewhere...

Nope- that was my first connection as well.
But, yeah, there are lots of SciFi stories with the concept of rich people parcelling out their organic lifespan over long periods of clock-time via cryonics or similar unobtaniacal methods.
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darkmobius
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby darkmobius » Mon Dec 12, 2011 6:20 pm UTC

UniqueScreenname wrote:I started writing a paper on this once, and I found out it's actually cryonics. Cryogenics is producing very low temperatures, hence the "gen".



First thing I thought when I saw the comic is that it's "cryonics" not "cryogenics". One of those few pedantries that when you get told you can't help pointing it out when you see it.

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Millumi
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Millumi » Mon Dec 12, 2011 6:33 pm UTC

It all makes sense now!
This is the real reason for the world of Idiocracy.
All the engineers got caught in an infinite loop.
XD
Omnia vincit veritas.

Joost
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Joost » Mon Dec 12, 2011 8:06 pm UTC

Awesome, Randall! It's been a few great ones lately - keep it up :)

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Ghyrt » Mon Dec 12, 2011 8:09 pm UTC

Asco wrote:
aldonius wrote:
Asco wrote:Is this really a tragedy of the commons though? ... As more and more scientists decide to freeze themselves, supply would drop, and you would see the wage of scientists rise to accomodate the falling supply until you hit a new equilibrium where the marginal scientist was indifferent between cryogenic freezing and staying in the present and being rich.

Fair call, though the comic does explicitly state that no one has been building anything new. I guess this is where comic and reality diverge. :?


Well, it is theoretically possible that all scientists value going to the future over any wage they could get now. The scenario still wouldn't happen though, even if the scientists did not care about wage at all, because whenever someone is frozen not only does the marginal product of the remaining scientists go up, but (and this is really what the comic is about) the expected value of going to the future also decreases. Taken to the extreme there would be one scientist left in the present, who would get no payoff for going.

mfb wrote:Don't forget that the market for scientists is not instant. And some individual scientists are not enough to find something new. So if too many of them are frozen before the market reacts...

The forward looking scientist would know this, and stay behind anyway :)
Also: I think there would be diminishing returns to the research of the marginal scientist, such that the fewer there are the more ideas there are left for the rest to come up with.
This is by no means certain though, because of the nonrival nature of most knowledge.


Don't forget that once enough scientists and engineers decided to freeze themselves, there would be little to gain from remaining in the present. Even if some people figured out what was going on, they might still decide to freeze themselves in hopes that 30 years in the future, enough people would wise-up.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby SerialTroll » Mon Dec 12, 2011 8:16 pm UTC

The actual intelligent visitors of this site will recognize this as an interesting application of game theory. The rest will just LOL!

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby ijuin » Mon Dec 12, 2011 8:36 pm UTC

Of course, once you've frozen yourself, what do the future people gain from waking you up? They have no emotional attachment to you unless you were somebody famous or they are your personal descendants, and as far as money goes they could just get you declared dead and take your assets. Unless they want to study you and your archaic knowledge and culture, just what would they get out of it?

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby mfb » Mon Dec 12, 2011 10:48 pm UTC

Asco wrote:
mfb wrote:Don't forget that the market for scientists is not instant. And some individual scientists are not enough to find something new. So if too many of them are frozen before the market reacts...

The forward looking scientist would know this, and stay behind anyway :)
Also: I think there would be diminishing returns to the research of the marginal scientist, such that the fewer there are the more ideas there are left for the rest to come up with.
This is by no means certain though, because of the nonrival nature of most knowledge.

Well, many inventions and discoveries rely on a lot of infrastructure and manpower. The LHC with its collaborations of thousands of scientists (and several thousand other jobs) are just an example where it is obvious, but every lab relys on tools designed and built elsewhere, sometimes at the limit of what is possible today. That is not just linear with the number of scientists. And I am not sure where the Nash equilibrium is in that system. "All do time travel" is one, "nobody does" is not...

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby mrleinad » Mon Dec 12, 2011 11:55 pm UTC

I pretty much doubt all of those cryonics machines would never fail and never need maintenance, so you'd need engineers around to work on them.

Eventually, all you'll have is Cryonics Engineers, who would of course want to freeze themselves so the new engineers coming after them would take care of their cryonic machines.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Chaoszerom » Tue Dec 13, 2011 12:49 am UTC

mfb wrote:
aldonius wrote:Fair call, though the comic does explicitly state that no one has been building anything new. I guess this is where comic and reality diverge. :?

Don't forget that the market for scientists is not instant. And some individual scientists are not enough to find something new. So if too many of them are frozen before the market reacts...


Really nice comic :)

Instant scientists! Just add water! (also remove the cryogenesis tube)(use by date within 14 days of opening)

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keithl
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby keithl » Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:48 am UTC

Imagine coming back 30 years later, and plowing through 4696 xkcd cartoons. If you instead immediately popped back into cryonic suspension for another 30 years, you would have 9392 xkcd cartoons to deal with. Eventually, there would be millions of xkcd cartoons to read, written by hundreds of generations of Munroes, and your head would explode.

Nah, three a week is about right.

( ps: 365.242... * 30 * 3 / 7 => 4695.97... not counting "leap" xkcd cartoons )

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby rmsgrey » Tue Dec 13, 2011 3:54 am UTC

Of course, the correct approach is to calculate the optimum percentage of engineers to leave awake to maximise the expected utility of freezing the remainder for 30 years. Each engineer then uses a handy random number generator to determine whether to stay awake or get frozen with the appropriate probabilities. Provided the random number generators are independent, and there are a statistically significant number of engineers, you should end up with close to the optimum number staying awake (the alternative is to organise a lottery, but that requires active co-ordination rather than simply deducing and adopting the same optimal strategy as everyone else)

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Kick » Tue Dec 13, 2011 4:46 am UTC

I was bored and found this somewhere on the Internet (was looking up very short stories), somehow felt like it might be appreciated here:

"Cryonics: Disney thawed. Mickey gnawed. Omigawd."
- Eileen Gunn
I'm never sarcastic.

DavidRoss
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby DavidRoss » Tue Dec 13, 2011 6:09 am UTC

rmsgrey wrote:Of course, the correct approach is to calculate the optimum percentage of engineers to leave awake to maximise the expected utility of freezing the remainder for 30 years.


There is no expected global utility to freezing the engineers, only individual utility that applies to those individuals who jump forward. The future doesn't need them - at least not as engineers, but maybe as historians and story tellers. I mean, it would be totally cool to have ported an engineer from 1930 forward to hear firsthand what it was like, but we'd not likely see any good coding out of him (and it would be a "him"). So, really the benefits of fast forwarding are to the individuals.

Hmm, but then again, I've seen some pretty poor code, so maybe there would be a global utility... And, yet again, maybe fast forwarding is not always good for the engineer.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby DavidRoss » Tue Dec 13, 2011 6:14 am UTC

Trinalsis wrote:
hamjudo wrote:I just want to skip winters. Can I do that?
Yes, but only by freezing yourself alive, which may or may not miss the point depending on why you want to do so.


Um, there's existing technology to do that. Just Google "ryanair Rome" or "Southwest airlines Orlando". For a fee, you can go into a flying metal box that will port you to a place that skips winters.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Asco » Tue Dec 13, 2011 6:23 am UTC

mfb wrote:Well, many inventions and discoveries rely on a lot of infrastructure and manpower. The LHC with its collaborations of thousands of scientists (and several thousand other jobs) are just an example where it is obvious, but every lab relys on tools designed and built elsewhere, sometimes at the limit of what is possible today. That is not just linear with the number of scientists. And I am not sure where the Nash equilibrium is in that system. "All do time travel" is one, "nobody does" is not...


The fact that it is not linear with the number of scientists is what I was getting at. Imagine a graph that plots amount of science (or inventions or whatever) against number of scientists. It would have to be increasing everywhere (f'(x)>0), It could be convex (f''>0) starting from x = 0, because of collaboration like you said, but would at some point drop off and have diminishing returns (f''(x)<0) as the different fields are satiated. What matters though is personal tradeoff.

From there I think the result would depend on whether they have to make their decision at the same time, or over a period of time. If at the same time time travel would be the dominant strategy. If not at the same time, "nobody does" is still not an equilibrium, but neither is "Everybody does", since at the very least the last scientist left would face no payoff from going.
Actually thinking about it a bit more "1 guy stays behind" would probably be the Nash equilibrium in that situation, since everybody else would face a positive payoff from going.
This is, of course, under the (perhaps not entirely unrealistic :D ) assumption that scientists and engineers care about nothing else than how high the technological level in society is.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby hujackus » Tue Dec 13, 2011 7:10 am UTC

I love this one.

This space is reserved for time travel notes to myself.




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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby The Moomin » Tue Dec 13, 2011 9:58 am UTC

peewee_RotA wrote:Anyone else notice that the box with the little tube changes position? In the first few cells it is at the foot of the device and whens he wakes up it is at the head.


It's the timing device. It works it's way around the base of the chamber, and when it reaches the head, you're done.

Trinalsis wrote:
hamjudo wrote:I just want to skip winters. Can I do that?
Yes, but only by freezing yourself alive, which may or may not miss the point depending on why you want to do so.


And that made me laugh.
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The cats are alive because I'm alive.
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RobotGymnast
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby RobotGymnast » Tue Dec 13, 2011 10:04 am UTC

Didn't Skeptically Speaking mention a similar comic during the interview with Randall?
http://skepticallyspeaking.ca/episodes/27-randall-monroe

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Uzh
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Uzh » Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:14 am UTC

DavidRoss wrote:
Trinalsis wrote:
hamjudo wrote:I just want to skip winters. Can I do that?
Yes, but only by freezing yourself alive, which may or may not miss the point depending on why you want to do so.


Um, there's existing technology to do that. Just Google "ryanair Rome" or "Southwest airlines Orlando". For a fee, you can go into a flying metal box that will port you to a place that skips winters.


Well, it's not exactly "skipping winter". It might be "avoid the cold weather during winter in the northern hemisphere" but you will have all the annoying things during winter including red-clothed guys, get used to a new year, celebrating your mother-in-laws birthday, dull tv-programs and so on.

Georg
"The problem is that humans have these darn biological limitations and if it gets too far from 293 K they'll start complaining, or die." http://forums.xkcd.com/viewtopic.php?f=60&t=106000#p3483385

Harry Voyager
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Harry Voyager » Tue Dec 13, 2011 12:03 pm UTC

ijuin wrote:Of course, once you've frozen yourself, what do the future people gain from waking you up? They have no emotional attachment to you unless you were somebody famous or they are your personal descendants, and as far as money goes they could just get you declared dead and take your assets. Unless they want to study you and your archaic knowledge and culture, just what would they get out of it?


That would be Cryoburn.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby brenok » Tue Dec 13, 2011 1:57 pm UTC

DavidRoss wrote:
rmsgrey wrote:Of course, the correct approach is to calculate the optimum percentage of engineers to leave awake to maximise the expected utility of freezing the remainder for 30 years.


There is no expected global utility to freezing the engineers, only individual utility that applies to those individuals who jump forward. The future doesn't need them - at least not as engineers, but maybe as historians and story tellers. I mean, it would be totally cool to have ported an engineer from 1930 forward to hear firsthand what it was like, but we'd not likely see any good coding out of him (and it would be a "him"). So, really the benefits of fast forwarding are to the individuals.

Hmm, but then again, I've seen some pretty poor code, so maybe there would be a global utility... And, yet again, maybe fast forwarding is not always good for the engineer.


But isn't the idea of the comic that technology hasn't advanced, so their knowledge would still be needed in the future?

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby snowyowl » Tue Dec 13, 2011 2:29 pm UTC

hujackus wrote:I love this one.

This space is reserved for time travel notes to myself.

DON'T MARRY JEN



I'm not sure if you can use forward time travel for notes to yourself, but you're welcome to try.

brenok wrote:
DavidRoss wrote:
rmsgrey wrote:Of course, the correct approach is to calculate the optimum percentage of engineers to leave awake to maximise the expected utility of freezing the remainder for 30 years.


There is no expected global utility to freezing the engineers, only individual utility that applies to those individuals who jump forward. The future doesn't need them - at least not as engineers, but maybe as historians and story tellers. I mean, it would be totally cool to have ported an engineer from 1930 forward to hear firsthand what it was like, but we'd not likely see any good coding out of him (and it would be a "him"). So, really the benefits of fast forwarding are to the individuals.

Hmm, but then again, I've seen some pretty poor code, so maybe there would be a global utility... And, yet again, maybe fast forwarding is not always good for the engineer.


But isn't the idea of the comic that technology hasn't advanced, so their knowledge would still be needed in the future?


It depends on how many scientists and engineers took the slow path. I'd imagine only those without non-engineer friends and family would freeze themselves - so, about 80%.
The preceding comment is an automated response.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby DarCK » Tue Dec 13, 2011 2:37 pm UTC

Ghyrt wrote:
Asco wrote:
aldonius wrote:
Asco wrote:Is this really a tragedy of the commons though? ... As more and more scientists decide to freeze themselves, supply would drop, and you would see the wage of scientists rise to accomodate the falling supply until you hit a new equilibrium where the marginal scientist was indifferent between cryogenic freezing and staying in the present and being rich.

Fair call, though the comic does explicitly state that no one has been building anything new. I guess this is where comic and reality diverge. :?


Well, it is theoretically possible that all scientists value going to the future over any wage they could get now. The scenario still wouldn't happen though, even if the scientists did not care about wage at all, because whenever someone is frozen not only does the marginal product of the remaining scientists go up, but (and this is really what the comic is about) the expected value of going to the future also decreases. Taken to the extreme there would be one scientist left in the present, who would get no payoff for going.

mfb wrote:Don't forget that the market for scientists is not instant. And some individual scientists are not enough to find something new. So if too many of them are frozen before the market reacts...

The forward looking scientist would know this, and stay behind anyway :)
Also: I think there would be diminishing returns to the research of the marginal scientist, such that the fewer there are the more ideas there are left for the rest to come up with.
This is by no means certain though, because of the nonrival nature of most knowledge.


Don't forget that once enough scientists and engineers decided to freeze themselves, there would be little to gain from remaining in the present. Even if some people figured out what was going on, they might still decide to freeze themselves in hopes that 30 years in the future, enough people would wise-up.


Being the last of the engineers could you not be king?

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby DarCK » Tue Dec 13, 2011 2:44 pm UTC

ijuin wrote:Of course, once you've frozen yourself, what do the future people gain from waking you up? They have no emotional attachment to you unless you were somebody famous or they are your personal descendants, and as far as money goes they could just get you declared dead and take your assets. Unless they want to study you and your archaic knowledge and culture, just what would they get out of it?


If all the people with dreams of the future skip ahead when they get there they are still the people with dreams. The people left behind are the kind satisfied with things as they are or longing for what once was. In that case how much progress do you think will be made?

Things could actually regress if enough people skipped.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Fire Brns » Tue Dec 13, 2011 3:08 pm UTC

Uzh wrote:
DavidRoss wrote:
Trinalsis wrote:
hamjudo wrote:I just want to skip winters. Can I do that?
Yes, but only by freezing yourself alive, which may or may not miss the point depending on why you want to do so.


Um, there's existing technology to do that. Just Google "ryanair Rome" or "Southwest airlines Orlando". For a fee, you can go into a flying metal box that will port you to a place that skips winters.


Well, it's not exactly "skipping winter". It might be "avoid the cold weather during winter in the northern hemisphere" but you will have all the annoying things during winter including red-clothed guys, get used to a new year, celebrating your mother-in-laws birthday, dull tv-programs and so on.

Georg

Skipping cold weather lol, sure it doesn't snow down here but it can get close to freezing at night and you won't want to go outside without a sweater. On the other hand we have a lower suicide rate. IDK, move to one of those countries that does NOT celebrate christmas but IS warm; Saudi Arabia, Zimbabwe, Somalia?
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby cybersmythe » Tue Dec 13, 2011 4:16 pm UTC

I can't believe that, technologists generally being control freaks, that there wouldn't be a large contingent who would pretend to enter their cryonic chamber, only to sneak out early so that they can mold technologies in their preferred image.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby enumerated powers » Tue Dec 13, 2011 5:29 pm UTC

hamjudo wrote:I just want to skip winters. Can I do that?


I was thinking "take a nap outside in November" (Northern Hemisphere) but I'm still working out the bugs in the "wake me up in April" thing.

:)

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby hujackus » Tue Dec 13, 2011 8:00 pm UTC

snowyowl wrote:
hujackus wrote:I love this one.

This space is reserved for time travel notes to myself.

DON'T MARRY JEN



I'm not sure if you can use forward time travel for notes to yourself, but you're welcome to try.


The Idea is that if i invent a time machine to go back in time, I can tell myself how to make it.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Dec 14, 2011 4:09 am UTC

DarCK wrote:If all the people with dreams of the future skip ahead when they get there they are still the people with dreams. The people left behind are the kind satisfied with things as they are or longing for what once was. In that case how much progress do you think will be made?


Interesting... if we were talking time travel instead of cryogenics, and everyone who longed for the past went to the past and everyone who longed for the future went to the future, and everyone who likes it perfectly fine right now stayed put, would we -- assuming a single-(somehow-)consistent-timeline model of time travel -- end up with a past overpopulated with dark-ages luddites, who slowly die out of their own backward ignorance until against all odds technology eventually develops to the point where time travel exists, at which point the world suddenly becomes grossly underpopulated as only a small stock of average people perfectly happy with the status quo remain, who then die out with the subsequent collapse of civilization, leaving a barren world ripe for resettlement by all the forward-looking people when they finally arrive in the future?

How do we know this hasn't already isn't won't happened?
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Proginoskes » Wed Dec 14, 2011 8:08 am UTC

hujackus wrote:
snowyowl wrote:
hujackus wrote:I love this one.

This space is reserved for time travel notes to myself.

DON'T MARRY JEN
DON'T VISIT MYSELF & SAY HOW TO BUILD A TIME MACHINE.



I'm not sure if you can use forward time travel for notes to yourself, but you're welcome to try.


The Idea is that if i invent a time machine to go back in time, I can tell myself how to make it.


Ah yes, that old paradox. (Or is it a new one?)

Be careful: The last time I tried that, Carbon-13 wound up being the stable isotope.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby scarletmanuka » Wed Dec 14, 2011 8:09 am UTC

Uzh wrote:
DavidRoss wrote:
Trinalsis wrote:
hamjudo wrote:I just want to skip winters. Can I do that?
Yes, but only by freezing yourself alive, which may or may not miss the point depending on why you want to do so.

Um, there's existing technology to do that. Just Google "ryanair Rome" or "Southwest airlines Orlando". For a fee, you can go into a flying metal box that will port you to a place that skips winters.

Well, it's not exactly "skipping winter". It might be "avoid the cold weather during winter in the northern hemisphere" but you will have all the annoying things during winter including red-clothed guys, get used to a new year, celebrating your mother-in-laws birthday, dull tv-programs and so on.

You can easily skip winter using the same technology, however; you just need to travel to the opposite hemisphere every six months. If you live in the Northern Hemisphere from say April to September, and in the Southern Hemisphere from October to March, you'll never have to experience winter again. If you can find someone who wants to avoid summer, you may be able to work out a home-swap deal to make this more cost-effective.

Of course, you'll still get the red-clothed guys, new year, etc., because they are not so much "annoying things during winter" as they are "annoying things during a certain time of year". If your primary concern is to avoid such things, you don't want to skip winter as such; you just want to skip a particular part of the year, and you need a different set of technology for that. Dull TV programs seem to be a year-round thing, so I don't know why you brought that up.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby Madcap Chickadee » Wed Dec 14, 2011 12:01 pm UTC

I just finished reading "The Door Into Summer" by Robert A. Heinlein and suddenly I find this comic much funnier (though I still loved it to begin with).

If I remember correctly, upon the protagonist waking up from cryosleep in the oh-so distant future (2000), a lot of the current population was peeved at the Sleepers and saw them as irresponsible slackers who couldn't get along in their own time, and were dumped into the future by the current population's grandparents who assumed everything would magically be better.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby DarCK » Wed Dec 14, 2011 1:57 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:
DarCK wrote:If all the people with dreams of the future skip ahead when they get there they are still the people with dreams. The people left behind are the kind satisfied with things as they are or longing for what once was. In that case how much progress do you think will be made?


Interesting... if we were talking time travel instead of cryogenics, and everyone who longed for the past went to the past and everyone who longed for the future went to the future, and everyone who likes it perfectly fine right now stayed put, would we -- assuming a single-(somehow-)consistent-timeline model of time travel -- end up with a past overpopulated with dark-ages luddites, who slowly die out of their own backward ignorance until against all odds technology eventually develops to the point where time travel exists, at which point the world suddenly becomes grossly underpopulated as only a small stock of average people perfectly happy with the status quo remain, who then die out with the subsequent collapse of civilization, leaving a barren world ripe for resettlement by all the forward-looking people when they finally arrive in the future?

How do we know this hasn't already isn't won't happened?


We wouldn't necessarily know.

The grass is always green people would probably screw it up always wanting to be where ever they aren't.

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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby incircuitous » Wed Dec 14, 2011 11:02 pm UTC

cellocgw wrote:
VoronX wrote:Am I the only one this reminds of Vernor Vinge's Marooned in Realtime?
I've never seen this subject explored in such an extreme manner elsewhere...

Nope- that was my first connection as well.
But, yeah, there are lots of SciFi stories with the concept of rich people parcelling out their organic lifespan over long periods of clock-time via cryonics or similar unobtaniacal methods.


I am reading Marooned for the first time right now! It contains awesome concepts, for example, two different characters are both legends from each other's past. Think about it a while and it will make sense.

ijuin
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby ijuin » Thu Dec 15, 2011 6:16 am UTC

DarCK wrote:
ijuin wrote:Of course, once you've frozen yourself, what do the future people gain from waking you up? They have no emotional attachment to you unless you were somebody famous or they are your personal descendants, and as far as money goes they could just get you declared dead and take your assets. Unless they want to study you and your archaic knowledge and culture, just what would they get out of it?


If all the people with dreams of the future skip ahead when they get there they are still the people with dreams. The people left behind are the kind satisfied with things as they are or longing for what once was. In that case how much progress do you think will be made?

Things could actually regress if enough people skipped.

But if the people left behind are satisfied with things, then why would they want to wake you up? You'd just mess up their paradise with your ambitions and things, so they'd prefer to either leave you frozen or just pull the plug on your life support and let you die.

babble
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby babble » Thu Dec 15, 2011 2:29 pm UTC

As others have pointed out, the title is wrong. Is the correct usage of English words like Cryonics and Cryogenics considered 'liberal arts' & therefore beneath the 'advanced' and rarefied academic thinking of xkcd (oh look. being part of innovation is boring. how very science-minded), & not worth bothering with? it's still kind of rubbish not to bother correcting it though.

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PeteP
What the peck?
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby PeteP » Thu Dec 15, 2011 8:34 pm UTC

Just make shifts, say 4 groups in 10 year shifts. You might say that wouldn't help even if a quarter of the engineers could do a quarter of the work, but I didn't say they should work normally. Their job is to instill a dislike/fear of cyronics in the new generation. The first shift will teach the new generation and influence them during that time and the shifts after that will at least be able to do some propaganda work.

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delusion
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Re: 0989: "Cryogenics"

Postby delusion » Mon Dec 19, 2011 4:03 am UTC

This reminds me of a short story I read and for the LIFE of me I can't remember what it was.

The premise was that one could pop forward fairly simply and easily, and it resulted in a lot of chaos. For instance, you go to the doctor's office, see there's nothing going on, and pop forward ten minutes. Every few minutes, someone else pops back from their forward travel to see if it's time for their visit, sees nothing going on, and pops forward again. The assistant comes out to find the next patient, sees nobody in the lobby, and pops forward ten minutes. So, nobody gets seen. I've been wracking my head trying to think what story this was; I think it was a short story in an anthology.


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