0294: "Bookstore"

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Peripatetic
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Postby Peripatetic » Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:54 am UTC

GusPatsy wrote:
dosboot wrote:
floyd4one wrote:how it's possible to read/understand/enjoy 70 words per second is beyond me.


Words not all needed understand, smtimes nt all lettrs too.


It's not possible, and the above response annoys me to no end. Dosboot, I genuinely hope you never pick up any fiction above Daniel Steele level, such a dismissive approach to prose is an insult to the people who spend hours perfecting their paragraphs. If you see speed-reading as a viable form of enjoying literature you should be condemned to the dregs of the literary world.

PS
Yes I'm a very slow reader.


I wouldn't make that kind of accusation. My sister reads books in a day and not much gets by her.

I'm jealous, but I also like reading slowly. It took me over a year to read Les Misérables. When I read Richard Powers, I often read paragraphs twice: once for the enjoyment of the language, and a second time for the meaning, as his sentences tend towards maximum complexity and information density.

Arancaytar wrote:And sometimes not all sentences. Some sentences are just cruft. Because fiction depends on some (not excessive) redundancy (ie, superfluous sentences), or it just reads like a newspaper report.


Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft. I don't understand what you mean by "fiction depends on some ... redundancy."

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Postby Ren » Wed Jul 25, 2007 10:42 am UTC

I'm not sure I like that this has become a 'brag about how fast you read' thread.

I did like the comic, though! I've read entire books in the store before...but has anyone else noticed that they're kind of discouraging it now? They used to have all kinds of chairs and whatnot in the Chapters near where I lived, but they're all gone now! And the salespeople yell at me if they find me sitting on the floor.

Solution: go to the back corner of the shop, with all the computer reference books. No one goes there.

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Postby Unforgiven » Wed Jul 25, 2007 10:50 am UTC

Peripatetic wrote:Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft. I don't understand what you mean by "fiction depends on some ... redundancy."

First say what you want to say, then say it, say it again, then say that you've said it.

Works for academic papers, at least. :roll:

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Postby Ren » Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:08 am UTC

Peripatetic wrote:Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft.

That's ridiculous. Every sentence is *not* essential to get the jist of the story, or even to understand it well. Seriously. How is a sentence describing the heroine's hair, or some such thing "essential"?
Good writing may not "contain cruft," but it's not good writing if the story can't stand by itself.

I'm a skimmer, too, when I read. I get the story, and if I enjoy it I reread the book--sometimes multiple times. I *do* find I miss sentences, but I've never found the book to be lacking the first time.
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Postby Chawmp » Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:09 am UTC

Although I've never read an entire book at the store, I'm not one to shy away from those comfy chairs. Mostly, I like to read philosophy and other "brain"(puzzles, religion, facts) books at the bookstore.

Usually, I buy books before I even open them, getting them as recommendations from friends. But, after I read them, I always think, "what will I do with this now?" But that's the great thing about books, they're still interesting and/or relevant 25 or so years down the track!
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Postby Rakshasa » Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:29 am UTC

Those who brag about how fast they read books, read books to brag about how fast they read those books.

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Postby 2DMan » Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:36 am UTC

Corollary: In my experience, those who read fast but really love books wish they read slower. I know this is true for me, at least.
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Postby zenten » Wed Jul 25, 2007 12:10 pm UTC

Peripatetic wrote:
Arancaytar wrote:And sometimes not all sentences. Some sentences are just cruft. Because fiction depends on some (not excessive) redundancy (ie, superfluous sentences), or it just reads like a newspaper report.


Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft. I don't understand what you mean by "fiction depends on some ... redundancy."


This was originally about Harry Potter however.

And I read fast, just not super fast.

Most people I know read the last Harry Potter book in about 6-7 hours, for a comparison. It would probably take me around that long too, if I ever got around to reading the series.

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Postby markfiend » Wed Jul 25, 2007 12:18 pm UTC

2DMan wrote:Corollary: In my experience, those who read fast but really love books wish they read slower. I know this is true for me, at least.
Me too. When I was ~15 I had a two-week seaside holiday with my parents, I took Lord Of The Rings along as holiday reading. Was I bored when I'd finished it after the first week...

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Postby Ghona » Wed Jul 25, 2007 12:19 pm UTC

Yeah, I've done this.

To be fair, though, it was the day before an AP test, and I wasn't going to buy a book which would become useless in two days. And I bought overpriced drinks.
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Postby 6453893 » Wed Jul 25, 2007 12:22 pm UTC

zagga20 wrote:Really? I found it different when i was in Sydney at this book store called Kinokuniya(sp?...) the entire Manga section was facing a window, with a sign saying "do not sit" (it was a very thin aisle too) and it was filled with really skinny/pretty Asian women and some guys. Also, they did'nt make a sound....


One of them could have been me! I go to Kinokuniya almost daily. I love the itty bitty cafe they have there too.

I tend to read manga and nonfiction in the stores sometimes, but I simply CANNOT read fiction in a bookstore. Pynchon is hard enough without being woken out of it evey other minute.

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Postby Sprocket » Wed Jul 25, 2007 12:39 pm UTC

Peripatetic wrote:
GusPatsy wrote:
dosboot wrote:
floyd4one wrote:how it's possible to read/understand/enjoy 70 words per second is beyond me.


Words not all needed understand, smtimes nt all lettrs too.


It's not possible, and the above response annoys me to no end. Dosboot, I genuinely hope you never pick up any fiction above Daniel Steele level, such a dismissive approach to prose is an insult to the people who spend hours perfecting their paragraphs. If you see speed-reading as a viable form of enjoying literature you should be condemned to the dregs of the literary world.

PS
Yes I'm a very slow reader.


I wouldn't make that kind of accusation. My sister reads books in a day and not much gets by her.

I'm jealous, but I also like reading slowly. It took me over a year to read Les Misérables. When I read Richard Powers, I often read paragraphs twice: once for the enjoyment of the language, and a second time for the meaning, as his sentences tend towards maximum complexity and information density.

Arancaytar wrote:And sometimes not all sentences. Some sentences are just cruft. Because fiction depends on some (not excessive) redundancy (ie, superfluous sentences), or it just reads like a newspaper report.


Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft. I don't understand what you mean by "fiction depends on some ... redundancy."


Reasons I didn't bother to buy Harry Potter 7. If everything is going to get spoiled for me in the course of a month, it will get spoiled whether I decide to read it later, or am taking that month to read the book, because it will take me at least that long. I'm KIND OF a slow reader, but more so I just can't read for very long unless I'm on the train. Not that I think HP is great literature, but I like to take my time with it, otherwise I don't really get submerged in the world or invested in the characters or anything. My friend Ryan asked me if I watched movies in slow motion for this reason. He's dead now.

That being said, I was totally confused when I came to this thread and that was the topic of discussion, I had it so solidly in my imagination that the character in today's comic had picked up some work of non-fiction that it took me a minute to figure out why this had even come up.

6453893 wrote:I tend to read manga and nonfiction in the stores sometimes, but I simply CANNOT read fiction in a bookstore. Pynchon is hard enough without being woken out of it evey other minute.

woo hoo! Pynchon. Honestly, I don't even try to understand Pynchon, I mean, I read it carefully and what not, but if I still don't really get anything from it, I just keep going. I really think getting inside someone else's head is pretty close to impossible, and I really tend to think that's what he wants. I really enjoyed the Crying of lot 49, but I won't say I got it.
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Postby bookishbunny » Wed Jul 25, 2007 12:52 pm UTC

I have personally shooed a teenager out of the isle of the graphic novel section and directed him towards a chair. I have become the fussy old lady. :( But really, I wanted to see what was on the shelves, which were blocked by his oily person.
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Lately there have been a number of discussions online over prospect that, the way the music industry is going, it won't be long before someone who's walking down the street whistling a tune will be arrested and charged with unlicensed public performance of a copyrighted tune.

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Postby space_raptor » Wed Jul 25, 2007 1:42 pm UTC

I have read entire books in the bookstore. Usually I buy a different book to make up for it. I never sit in the aisles though, that's just lazy and rude.

I used to love the Chapters chairs.
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Postby Sprocket » Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:30 pm UTC

bookishbunny wrote:I have personally shooed a teenager out of the isle of the graphic novel section and directed him towards a chair. I have become the fussy old lady. :( But really, I wanted to see what was on the shelves, which were blocked by his oily person.
Is that anything like noodly apendage?

This is one thing I really like about nice Barnes and Nobles, they have comfy chairs, they WANT you to sit down and read! :-D The one in Pittsford NY is practically a community gathering space. One thing I miss living in Boston. The only communicty spaces are coffee shops, and there's only Deisel left. (ok there're a few other I couldn't find without a guide)
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Postby jsnipe » Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:38 pm UTC

I am starting to think that Randall is being influenced by the forum threads; this last comic felt like it was written solely for the purpose of discussing it here.


Or maybe I just stayed up to late playing monkey island.
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Postby GusPatsy » Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:47 pm UTC

Arancaytar wrote:And sometimes not all sentences. Some sentences are just cruft. Because fiction depends on some (not excessive) redundancy (ie, superfluous sentences), or it just reads like a newspaper report.


So, you're saying without this redundancy fiction reads like a newspaper... and yet you recommend skipping it? If there is "redundancy" in a novel doesn't it usually signify some importance? Not that you're right in your conclusion, a newspaper report is without plot, purposefully anticlimactic. It's literal, and unemotional. The fact that you could ever compare a newspaper report to prose, in any way, solidifies my deep-seeded hatred for speed-readers. I'm going to write a novel called Fahrenheit 1451 (an approximation of the operating temperature of a cremation oven). A Utopian novel, about burning speed-readers.

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Postby Ilyanep » Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:49 pm UTC

So this comic made me think of this one article I read [cause of StumbleUpon] about how libraries could never start up in modern ages had they not existed before ( Link ) cause my first thought after reading the comic was "it's like book DRM". Except...I guess not digital. "Analogue Rights Management"?

Anyways, it really frustrates me sometimes how slowly I read. However, I don't think speed reading is a way to enjoy literature (although it's useful in other situations and so I wish I could do it). I wish I didn't read so damn slowly, though :\
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Postby bookishbunny » Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:54 pm UTC

CatProximity wrote:
bookishbunny wrote:I have personally shooed a teenager out of the isle of the graphic novel section and directed him towards a chair. I have become the fussy old lady. :( But really, I wanted to see what was on the shelves, which were blocked by his oily person.
Is that anything like noodly apendage?

This is one thing I really like about nice Barnes and Nobles, they have comfy chairs, they WANT you to sit down and read! :-D The one in Pittsford NY is practically a community gathering space. One thing I miss living in Boston. The only communicty spaces are coffee shops, and there's only Deisel left. (ok there're a few other I couldn't find without a guide)


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Postby Sprocket » Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:54 pm UTC

jsnipe wrote:I am starting to think that Randall is being influenced by the forum threads; this last comic felt like it was written solely for the purpose of discussing it here. Or maybe I just stayed up to late playing monkey island.

Gotta go with no. You're just getting delusions of grandure, like your life effects anything somehow. I've been there too, as a young boy, you get used to realizing that nothing you do will ever have an impact on anything. ::pat pat:: run along now, Timmy. Let grandpa smoke some ompium alone.

bookishbunny wrote:"Person" as in "physical self", you perv.
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Postby dabigkid » Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:54 pm UTC

McHell wrote:Japanese newspaper sellers though, are complaining that people read the interesting sections of magazines and then don't buy them, which is bankrupting many of them.

Specifically, they complain that `customers' use their mobiles to photograph articles, and then read those at leasure, in the tube for example.

Or so I read. Any light on this?

Then they should really consider adding more interesting sections so they couldn't possibly photograph them all.

And yes, this post is an unabashed excuse to post that image. You just made it so open to me!
wut

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Postby GusPatsy » Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:58 pm UTC

Ren wrote:
Peripatetic wrote:Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft.

That's ridiculous. Every sentence is *not* essential to get the jist of the story, or even to understand it well. Seriously. How is a sentence describing the heroine's hair, or some such thing "essential"?
Good writing may not "contain cruft," but it's not good writing if the story can't stand by itself.

I'm a skimmer, too, when I read. I get the story, and if I enjoy it I reread the book--sometimes multiple times. I *do* find I miss sentences, but I've never found the book to be lacking the first time.


Ugh... story is not writing. Writing is word play, emotional involvement, subtle development of ideas (often in sentences that seem unimportant at the time of reading). I bet you'd hate Catch-22. Anyone (over the age of 15) who hates Catch-22 ought not to read.

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Postby dabigkid » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:01 pm UTC

GusPatsy wrote:
Ren wrote:
Peripatetic wrote:Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft.

That's ridiculous. Every sentence is *not* essential to get the jist of the story, or even to understand it well. Seriously. How is a sentence describing the heroine's hair, or some such thing "essential"?
Good writing may not "contain cruft," but it's not good writing if the story can't stand by itself.

I'm a skimmer, too, when I read. I get the story, and if I enjoy it I reread the book--sometimes multiple times. I *do* find I miss sentences, but I've never found the book to be lacking the first time.


Ugh... story is not writing. Writing is word play, emotional involvement, subtle development of ideas (often in sentences that seem unimportant at the time of reading). I bet you'd hate Catch-22. Anyone (over the age of 15) who hates Catch-22 ought not to read.

What a horrible band. Our school's band teacher and my soon-to-be AP Theory teacher Mr. Egan was in it, and I just don't get the big deal.






Oh, the book? :)
wut

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Postby bookishbunny » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:05 pm UTC

GusPatsy wrote:
Ren wrote:
Peripatetic wrote:Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft.

That's ridiculous. Every sentence is *not* essential to get the jist of the story, or even to understand it well. Seriously. How is a sentence describing the heroine's hair, or some such thing "essential"?
Good writing may not "contain cruft," but it's not good writing if the story can't stand by itself.

I'm a skimmer, too, when I read. I get the story, and if I enjoy it I reread the book--sometimes multiple times. I *do* find I miss sentences, but I've never found the book to be lacking the first time.


Ugh... story is not writing. Writing is word play, emotional involvement, subtle development of ideas (often in sentences that seem unimportant at the time of reading). I bet you'd hate Catch-22. Anyone (over the age of 15) who hates Catch-22 ought not to read.


I can't even express how much I agree with Peripatetic & Gus!

Some books are worth just getting through to get the plot. I do that with a lot of cheese-grade horror, where the premise is way more interesting than the actual writing. But other books are meant to be READ! If you skim them, you are missing out on a valuable human experience. It would be like sitting at a sumptuous banquet with your taste buds removed. Sure, you'll get food down your throat, but you'll be missing all the pleasures and nuances of the feast.
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Postby Justinlrb » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:06 pm UTC

Tom wrote:
Nyarlathotep wrote:(Reference: I finished Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in an hour. Granted, that's an easy read children's book, but still... )

752 pages (mass market paperback version) in 60 minutes is about 12.53 pages per minute. You were reading a page every 4.79 seconds? Wow.


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Postby Commander Bob » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:18 pm UTC

Peripatetic wrote:Good writing means every sentence is essential. A great novel doesn't contain cruft. I don't understand what you mean by "fiction depends on some ... redundancy."

I disagree. I mean, writing is an art; its purpose to sound beautiful when written. Without any "unnecessary" sentences, things can get boring or under emphasized.

Say you're describing a character in a work of fiction. Now, I'm sure there are some choice words out there that could really sum up somebody in maybe a sentence or two. With a really dense sentence, one could probably say everything that needs to be said about this guy.

But wouldn't it be a better read if you gave this guy a paragraph or two? Wouldn't it be more artistic? I mean, maybe you wouldn't be saying anything more than you could squeeze into a couple of sentences. But that act of stretching it out, in my opinion, is what makes many novels really enjoyable to read, and less like a verbose textbook.

On a topic more related to the comic, I own issues #2 through #24 of my favorite manga. I don't own #1 because I read it in Barnes & Nobles. And I have to admit, I have a bad habit of sitting in aisles... Usually nobody minds, as I rarely see many people the manga/sci fi section at all.

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Postby quantheory » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:22 pm UTC

I suppose that with a photographic memory one can read as quickly as the physical constraints of the eye allow, but I think for substantial comprehension you have to slow way down. I can read faster than most people by quite a bit but I generally slow it down to the point at which I get a moderate amount of connotation from each word (and something like Harry Potter I can roll like a low-res movie; I have to put proper tones of voice on the dialog and all that sort of thing). Replaying a scene after you've gathered all the major details is nice.


More to the subject of the comic: let's say we have a sci-fi universe in which everyone has a photographic memory stored on implants in their brains, and can readily share the information with other people's brain-computers (*wonders, irrelevantly, whether it's more funny or scary to picture two people connected with a little black cable like when I played with TI-83s*). The idea of owning information (copyrights etc.) gets kind of ridiculous in this context; you are trying to control what people can do with their own memories. Not to mention that in order to enforce laws about spread of writing/music/software you would have to investigate people's minds.

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Postby bookishbunny » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:25 pm UTC

Commander Bob wrote:Say you're describing a character in a work of fiction. Now, I'm sure there are some choice words out there that could really sum up somebody in maybe a sentence or two. With a really dense sentence, one could probably say everything that needs to be said about this guy.

But wouldn't it be a better read if you gave this guy a paragraph or two? Wouldn't it be more artistic? I mean, maybe you wouldn't be saying anything more than you could squeeze into a couple of sentences. But that act of stretching it out, in my opinion, is what makes many novels really enjoyable to read, and less like a verbose textbook.


If these "more artistic" sentences make the reading enjoyable, then aren't they essential?

I think what Peri was saying was that every sentence is essential, and, therefore, should not be scanned for the sake of extracting only the plot from a work.
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Postby Nyarlathotep » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:25 pm UTC

H.H wrote:
Nyarlathotep wrote:
Tom wrote:
Nyarlathotep wrote:(Reference: I finished Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in an hour. Granted, that's an easy read children's book, but still... )

752 pages (mass market paperback version) in 60 minutes is about 12.53 pages per minute. You were reading a page every 4.79 seconds? Wow.


Yep.

I think I've slowed down since then though.



Not trying to be offensive or anything, this just amazes me beyond words.

Did you intentionally develop this skill of yours, or is it inherent?

Also, at a rate of less than 10 sec/pg, how much information do you retain,
especially scenery descriptions and the like (details I subconsciously skim over when reading too fast)?


As I said, it's been some time since I was able to retain that speed. And it's more uneven... like, some sections I read slower, some I completely breeze through. and my estimate may be off, it may have been an hour and a half. I KNOW I finished Azbakan in an hour.

Retention's decent but not permenent. For about the week afterwards I could recall it very well, but ask me now and all I can tell you is that I thought the quidditch match needed to go away.
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Postby Vaniver » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:27 pm UTC

I disagree. I mean, writing is an art; its purpose to sound beautiful when written. Without any "unnecessary" sentences, things can get boring or under emphasized.
You're not disagreeing, you're misunderstanding what he means by unnecessary.
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Postby warhorse » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:34 pm UTC

A good book must be read in its entirety because it is the symphony of words and not the plot that makes it enjoyable. When I start a book and it has a good plot but is poorly written, I usually just read the spoiler on Wikipedia.

I found my appreciation for words after reading Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchet where they turn seemingly mundane sentences into wonderful and hilarious works of art. Now when I read, I make it a point to read and comprehend every sentence at least for the words it contains if not for its contribution to the plot.
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Postby Dibley » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:12 pm UTC

CatProximity wrote:
6453893 wrote:I tend to read manga and nonfiction in the stores sometimes, but I simply CANNOT read fiction in a bookstore. Pynchon is hard enough without being woken out of it evey other minute.

woo hoo! Pynchon. Honestly, I don't even try to understand Pynchon, I mean, I read it carefully and what not, but if I still don't really get anything from it, I just keep going. I really think getting inside someone else's head is pretty close to impossible, and I really tend to think that's what he wants. I really enjoyed the Crying of lot 49, but I won't say I got it.


I have decided that the trick to reading pynchon is letting go of all hold on reality and comprehension. You aren't necessarily going to have the damnedest clue what's happening, but enjoy the ride.

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Postby sir_schwick » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:13 pm UTC

This is especially true of books literature that do not follow traditional notions of plot. One cannot really appreciate 'The Old Man and the Sea' simply from a Wikipedia summary or skimming.

Speed reading is also not an option when it comes to authors that abandon traditional notions of how to write in English. James Joyce has really been kicking my arse lately with his whimsical Ireland prose.

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Belial
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Postby Belial » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:14 pm UTC

Faulkner will destroy your world.

You'll be all trying to skim and speed-read, and then it'll just be like "Bam! You have no fucking clue what the subject of this fucking sentence even is, bitch, because it started three pages ago and you weren't paying attention!"

And you'll be all "Please don't hit me again, Mister Faulkner"

And he'll be like "I don't want to, but you just don't LISTEN, Baby...."
addams wrote:A drunk neighbor is better than a sober Belial.


They/them

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Postby Eleven » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:32 pm UTC

Comic is made of supreme win with extra cheese. It reminds me of the Books-A-Million I used to frequent. For about a month I was setting off the theft detectors at the door with no books. Luckily, they knew me and stopped even checking after a while, but I was so confused and kept checking my pockets to make sure I didn't steal a bookmark subconsciously (I don't, but how would I know?). The security guard figured it out though: The anti-theft tag on my new jacket had never been taken off! LOL WHAT?! And they were so nice, they took it off for me there. Great place, I miss it (and the Pokemon tournaments, but that's another story :) .)

As for the speed reading, it is possible to read veryveryvery fast and still remember the story, even subtle puns and the like. I read books way too fast, but I can still remember character banter and environment descriptions long after I've closed the book. It's kind of why I've stopped buying manga, I tend to finish before I get in the car good XD. And then I'm all "OH MAN, you gotta read this one! It's got yakkityyakkityyakityyakyakyakyak... AND THERE'S A CLIFFHANGER! :shock: "

EDIT: Milk through the nose, onto the keyboard, laughing at Belial's post.

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Postby pfargtl » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:40 pm UTC

warhorse wrote: Terry Pratchet


Is a wonderful author. I have immensely enjoyed every one of his books.

I can speed-read, I choose not to. As bunches of people have said already, reading is an experience to be savored, not plowed through for a plot line.

It took me 7 months to read Don Quixote, more than year to read War and Peace, 5 months to read the LOTR trilogy... etc etc. For your normal-sized fiction novel (c. 300-500p), It would take me a week to two weeks.

I often re-read sentences, paragraphs, chapters, and occasionally start the book over before I've finished, just to get more out of the words.
What the Pfargtl?

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Postby CatCow » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:47 pm UTC

I don't read terribly fast. Faster than the rest of my family it seems, if I can keep at it... But I have this terrible problem where my mind will wander off into a daydream, but much of the time my eyes keep reading on... I get to the end of the page and have to re-read the whole page after the daydream is over to figure it out again! Gah. As a result, it takes roughly an entire day to get through the average sized paperback book.

One of these days, I'm going to go to a bookstore and sit around all day long reading books until they throw me out :twisted:

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voodooKobra
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Postby voodooKobra » Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:04 pm UTC

SimonSwift wrote:So, at my local Barnes and Noble (bookstore), they used to put the manga section next to the graphic novels/comics section. Now, I know it was an honest mistake, but those are totally not the same groups of people. No offense to manga-readers here, but many of them tend to be fat, loud, and all-around very annoying. Case-in-point, when I was looking for the new issue of Civil War one time, I literally had to STEP AROUND said fat, loud, and all-around very annoying people as they were literally sitting down in the middle of the damned aisle reading books. No, it's NOT a library, it's a BOOKSTORE. You don't read books in bookstores, you BUY them, and you ESPECIALLY don't sit down in the middle of the aisle with the clear intent of sitting around reading the entirety of the book.

Nevertheless, now they've moved the graphic novels and comics over to the geek corner where they shove everything awesome like D&D books and sci-fi novels, so it's all good.

As for things actually pertaining to the comic, I can't say I could even have a chance of reading the whole book in the store. It takes a lot for me to be immersed. Usually I need music to block noises, nothing going on in my peripheral vision, nobody talking nearby, etcetera. Otherwise I get distracted and my mind wanders from the story.

~Siswi

At my local Books a Million, we have the comic manga on one side of the shelf and the graphic novels and D&D stuff on the other side. Since I like all 3, it rules. Sadly they don't carry dice.
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InsaneZeroG
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Postby InsaneZeroG » Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:08 pm UTC

I feel guilty if I ever do read a book in a bookstore, but it's nice to be able to look at the content before I buy it...like sampling music at a music store. That's why there's ~$300 worth of manga sitting behind me (something that would probably pale in comparison to some others). Plus, I, like many, prefer to have the physical copy of the book rather than just the memory of it. That's why people who had the ending of the Harry Potter books ruined for them still bought it ;)


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