1090: "Formal Languages"

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby justalurkr » Fri Aug 03, 2012 1:27 pm UTC

jpk wrote:Pun on "context-free grammar".

Anyone in the Cambridge/Somerville area up for a good lynch mob? 'Cause I could whip up a few torches, no problem.


Oh, I can make time to come in from Atlanta for this party.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby flicky1991 » Fri Aug 03, 2012 1:28 pm UTC

justalurkr wrote:One of the best things about xkcd is that it helps one to identify (with great alacrity) the kind of geek one is...not.

And here I thought "formal language" meant never splitting prepositions at the end of sentences.


That's a rule I don't really pay attention to.
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby endolith » Fri Aug 03, 2012 1:36 pm UTC

TheGrammarBolshevik wrote:It's not an explanation, but a definition. If they started at the building blocks of formal language theory, the introduction would be far too long, and redundant across each class of grammar.


They could do better than this, though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia ... ad_section

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby SerMufasa » Fri Aug 03, 2012 2:07 pm UTC

Even after the explanations I'm not sure I fully understand it, but that's ok. I find it funnier if I hear it in the She Blinded Me With Science voice (substituting "Grammar!" for "Science!", natch).
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby OtherRob » Fri Aug 03, 2012 2:13 pm UTC

carolineee wrote:
vortighast wrote:The wiki page looks more complicated...can we get a layman's explanation?

Ok, I'll try. We all know the word "grammar" from English class. It is a set of rules that tell us how we build sentences....


Thanks. That was a really good explanation. And now I get the joke. :)

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Garnasha » Fri Aug 03, 2012 2:15 pm UTC

endolith wrote:
TheGrammarBolshevik wrote:It's not an explanation, but a definition. If they started at the building blocks of formal language theory, the introduction would be far too long, and redundant across each class of grammar.


They could do better than this, though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia ... ad_section
I imagine a few xkcd readers who are more confident than I* in their understanding of the subject will rush to wikipedia any moment now and fix that.

*: Does anyone else have this strange feeling where they think they know what's correct, but it just feels wrong? I kept wanting to write "me" there, to the point where I'm not even sure "I" is even correct. I might be mixing up the rules for different languages.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby nykevin » Fri Aug 03, 2012 2:41 pm UTC

Garnasha wrote:
endolith wrote:
TheGrammarBolshevik wrote:It's not an explanation, but a definition. If they started at the building blocks of formal language theory, the introduction would be far too long, and redundant across each class of grammar.


They could do better than this, though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia ... ad_section
I imagine a few xkcd readers who are more confident than I* in their understanding of the subject will rush to wikipedia any moment now and fix that.

*: Does anyone else have this strange feeling where they think they know what's correct, but it just feels wrong? I kept wanting to write "me" there, to the point where I'm not even sure "I" is even correct. I might be mixing up the rules for different languages.


You're right, "I" is wrong since it's not the subject of the sentence (which is the first "I").

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby dash » Fri Aug 03, 2012 3:04 pm UTC

carolineee wrote:For this comic, the joke is just that the word "grammar" doesn't really have a context here. Thus, it's a context free grammar ;)


Thanks for that explanation. I'm a programmer and have used bison/yacc to generate parsers, and I couldn't unravel this "joke".
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby TheGrammarBolshevik » Fri Aug 03, 2012 3:05 pm UTC

nykevin wrote:You're right, "I" is wrong since it's not the subject of the sentence (which is the first "I").

Uhh, no, by the usual rules "I" is correct, as it's the subject of the implicit clause ("more confident than I am").
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby airdrik » Fri Aug 03, 2012 3:09 pm UTC

SerMufasa wrote:Even after the explanations I'm not sure I fully understand it, but that's ok. I find it funnier if I hear it in the She Blinded Me With Science voice (substituting "Grammar!" for "Science!", natch).

That's awesome!

It's syntax in motion
She turned her tender eyes to me
As deep as any statement
As sweet as any harmony
Mmm - but she blinded me with grammar
"She blinded me with grammar!"
I tripped because it's context-free

When I'm dancing close to her
"Blinding me with grammar - grammar!"
I can smell the symbols
"Blinding me with grammar - grammar!"
"Grammar!"
"Grammar!"

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Rotherian » Fri Aug 03, 2012 3:46 pm UTC

flicky1991 wrote:
justalurkr wrote:One of the best things about xkcd is that it helps one to identify (with great alacrity) the kind of geek one is...not.

And here I thought "formal language" meant never splitting prepositions at the end of sentences.


That's a rule I don't really pay attention to.


Me either. But that is mostly because I've never heard of a rule applying to splitting prepositions at the end of a sentence.

I mean, I've heard of a rule about not splitting infinitives. I've also heard of a rule about not ending a sentence with a preposition. But I've never heard of a rule specifically about not splitting prepositions at the end of sentences. (Especially since most of the prepositions are single words - such as to, from, at, with, and others).
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby thenonsequitur » Fri Aug 03, 2012 3:52 pm UTC

I was a linguistics major in college, a programmer today, and fully aware of context-free grammars and what they are. And I *still* somehow didn't get this joke until it was explained. Guess I was looking for something deeper than a pun (though I do love me a good groan-worthy pun!).

Rotherian wrote:I've heard of a rule about not splitting infinitives. I've also heard of a rule about not ending a sentence with a preposition.


I might add that both these so-called rules are actually not based on real usage; they aren't part of any natural "formal" register. Both these rules are hold-overs from old poorly-conceived prescriptivist teachings of the past, and are now primarily just tools in a non-educated grammar-nazi's repertoire.

TheGrammarBolshevik wrote:
nykevin wrote:You're right, "I" is wrong since it's not the subject of the sentence (which is the first "I").

Uhh, no, by the usual rules "I" is correct, as it's the subject of the implicit clause ("more confident than I am").


Actually, both "I" (nominative) and "me" (accusative) are highly attested in that context (and have been for ~500 years), and in fact accusative is more common today. The reason "I" is okay is, as TheGrammarBolshevik points out, because "than" can be considered a conjunction and "I" would be the subject of the implicit conjoined clause. "Me" is okay too, because "than" can equally-validly be considered a preposition where "me" is the object of the preposition. Both forms are considered standard, and both are correct. Here's a good summary for those of interested: http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/th ... an-me.aspx
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby San Fran Sam » Fri Aug 03, 2012 4:10 pm UTC

Well, my first thought was of David Niven at the 1974 Academy Awards.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby flicky1991 » Fri Aug 03, 2012 4:26 pm UTC

thenonsequitur wrote:
Rotherian wrote:I've heard of a rule about not splitting infinitives. I've also heard of a rule about not ending a sentence with a preposition.


I might add that both these so-called rules are actually not based on real usage; they aren't part of any natural "formal" register. Both these rules are hold-overs from old poorly-conceived prescriptivist teachings of the past, and are now primarily just tools in a non-educated grammar-nazi's repertoire.

I agree with you except for "so-called rules" - they're rules, even if we choose not to obey them. :)
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby evac156 » Fri Aug 03, 2012 4:27 pm UTC

HonoreDB wrote:Scaling Everest was, by far, the most amazing and transformative experience of my life.


And if you scale it by this:

| 0.001 1 1 |
| 1 0.001 1 |
| 1 1 0.001 |

It would then be much easier to climb.

(Sorry, can't see how to do a table/matrix in this markup.)

(Might need to be an old-school graphics geek to get this. :) )

Edit: Gack! Did this in 2D the first time. Now that would make a hard climb.
Last edited by evac156 on Fri Aug 03, 2012 6:21 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Роберт » Fri Aug 03, 2012 5:39 pm UTC

Garnasha wrote:
endolith wrote:
TheGrammarBolshevik wrote:It's not an explanation, but a definition. If they started at the building blocks of formal language theory, the introduction would be far too long, and redundant across each class of grammar.


They could do better than this, though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia ... ad_section
I imagine a few xkcd readers who are more confident than I* in their understanding of the subject will rush to wikipedia any moment now and fix that.

*: Does anyone else have this strange feeling where they think they know what's correct, but it just feels wrong? I kept wanting to write "me" there, to the point where I'm not even sure "I" is even correct. I might be mixing up the rules for different languages.

Just say "I imagine a few xkcd readers who are more confident than I am".
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby justalurkr » Fri Aug 03, 2012 5:41 pm UTC

thenonsequitur wrote:I was a linguistics major in college, a programmer today, and fully aware of context-free grammars and what they are. And I *still* somehow didn't get this joke until it was explained. Guess I was looking for something deeper than a pun (though I do love me a good groan-worthy pun!).

Rotherian wrote:I've heard of a rule about not splitting infinitives. I've also heard of a rule about not ending a sentence with a preposition.


I might add that both these so-called rules are actually not based on real usage; they aren't part of any natural "formal" register. Both these rules are hold-overs from old poorly-conceived prescriptivist teachings of the past, and are now primarily just tools in a non-educated grammar-nazi's repertoire.


Which is why I mash them up to poke at people who engage in discussions of prescriptive v. descriptive. I get some of the best expressions out of people that way that I usually only do it in person so I can watch. Also, random usage of these two rules in written and verbal communications at work has scored an appalling number of mentions in my performance appraisals of my "excellent" or "outstanding" verbal and written communications skills.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Trickster » Fri Aug 03, 2012 6:36 pm UTC

As a computer science lecturer who took linguistics as a minor in grad school, I am deeply embarrassed that I had to look at this thread to get the joke.

It's all linguistics fault, dammit.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Yakk » Fri Aug 03, 2012 7:42 pm UTC

It is ok. The joke really needs something to help explain it. A surrounding environment that would make it make sense. Without that, how are we to understand the joke?
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Max™ » Fri Aug 03, 2012 7:49 pm UTC

Yakk wrote:It is ok. The joke really needs something to help explain it. A surrounding environment that would make it make sense. Without that, how are we to understand the joke?

*puts a bag over Yakk's head and drags him away*

Nothing to see here folks, carry on.

Edit: I explained it to my gf, she said "the guy should have said 'THE GRAMMARIANS ARE COMING', ha ha", and was surprised when I actually laughed at it.
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Le_Forgeron » Fri Aug 03, 2012 7:52 pm UTC

Break through at the symposium about formal langages...
context free grammar.
(hide and run... bad pun!)

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Rotherian » Fri Aug 03, 2012 8:38 pm UTC

thenonsequitur wrote:I was a linguistics major in college, a programmer today, and fully aware of context-free grammars and what they are. And I *still* somehow didn't get this joke until it was explained. Guess I was looking for something deeper than a pun (though I do love me a good groan-worthy pun!).

Rotherian wrote:I've heard of a rule about not splitting infinitives. I've also heard of a rule about not ending a sentence with a preposition.


I might add that both these so-called rules are actually not based on real usage; they aren't part of any natural "formal" register. Both these rules are hold-overs from old poorly-conceived prescriptivist teachings of the past, and are now primarily just tools in a non-educated grammar-nazi's repertoire.



Emphasis mine. Although I am generally guilty of ignoring the rule about split infinitives, I understand that the rule exists, and my ignoring it isn't out of, well, ignorance. (Sheer obstinance is a more likely culprit.) I do, however, usually adhere to the rule that precludes the usage of prepositions at the end of a sentence, even during verbal communication. In written conversation, I normally just edit the sentence to avoid it - either by using "of which/whom/etc." or by re-wording it to avoid having it sound contrived.

As such, my usage is no less real than any other person's usage.

Let's explore a completely different, but (in my opinion) related, concept. Txt-ese and l33t/7334-speak are both real usages of language. I don't agree with those usages, but that doesn't make them any less real. (My disagreement with the usage of txt-ese stems more from the fact that the numbers that commonly replace words are homophones of the words that the numbers represent. So 2day, to me, represents twoday, not today.) Essentially, it boils down to personal preference.

Likewise, adherance to grammar rules (or conversely, defiance of grammar rules) outside of academia is largely a matter of personal preference.
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby thenonsequitur » Fri Aug 03, 2012 9:11 pm UTC

Rotherian wrote:Although I am generally guilty of ignoring the rule about split infinitives, I understand that the rule exists, and my ignoring it isn't out of, well, ignorance. (Sheer obstinance is a more likely culprit.) I do, however, usually adhere to the rule that precludes the usage of prepositions at the end of a sentence, even during verbal communication. In written conversation, I normally just edit the sentence to avoid it - either by using "of which/whom/etc." or by re-wording it to avoid having it sound contrived.

As such, my usage is no less real than any other person's usage.

Let's explore a completely different, but (in my opinion) related, concept. Txt-ese and l33t/7334-speak are both real usages of language. I don't agree with those usages, but that doesn't make them any less real. (My disagreement with the usage of txt-ese stems more from the fact that the numbers that commonly replace words are homophones of the words that the numbers represent. So 2day, to me, represents twoday, not today.) Essentially, it boils down to personal preference.

Likewise, adherance to grammar rules (or conversely, defiance of grammar rules) outside of academia is largely a matter of personal preference.


Since my premises are unwavering, I must hereafter declare you to be imaginary!

On a more serious note, you may follow one of those rules, but in that case you are an exception. When I say "real usage" I'm don't mean "anything spoken or written anywhere by anybody". "Usage", as linguistic jargon, refers to the way people under normal circumstances spontaneously produce natural language. Under that definition, "real usage" does not include following wholly-artificial rules -- prescriptions from hundreds of years ago based on poor analogies to Latin rather than by examining the way people actually use language. And while you may believe otherwise, I have the entire field of linguistics behind me in saying that the no-split-infinitives and the no-postposition-prepositions rules are wholly-artificial. It takes willful training to follow either of these rules, and such usage is not representative of natural usage. If you want a reference, here's a good place to start:

http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=3407

The article itself is good and links to a bunch of other articles with more information.

As far as Txt-ese and 1337-speak, those are more orthographic phenomena and thus are at most tangential to the discussion about syntax. But in any case, there is no doubt that these are absolutely real, and I would never claim otherwise.
Last edited by thenonsequitur on Fri Aug 03, 2012 9:25 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby ahammel » Fri Aug 03, 2012 9:16 pm UTC

To fair be, it is rather awkward to split one's infinitives too widely. "To boldly go where no-one has gone before" sounds fine, but "to boldly, courageously, doughtily and in a stalwart manner go where no-one has gone before" is a bit difficult to parse.
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby thenonsequitur » Fri Aug 03, 2012 9:33 pm UTC

Yes, it is definitely awkward to widely, long-windedly, and with complete disregard to structural elegance split one's infinitives.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby bmonk » Fri Aug 03, 2012 10:00 pm UTC

A dangling preposition is a construction you should never end with. (This is famously something up with which Winston Churchill would not put.)

If any word is improper at the end of a sentence, a linking verb is.

To ignorantly split an infinitive, even in English where to often split infinitives is allowed is a practice to religiously avoid.
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby evac156 » Fri Aug 03, 2012 11:32 pm UTC

Trickster wrote:As a computer science lecturer who took linguistics as a minor in grad school, I am deeply embarrassed that I had to look at this thread to get the joke.

It's all linguistics fault, dammit.


You were a minor, in grad school, when you took linguistics? Some kind of child prodigy? :lol:

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Yosarian2 » Sat Aug 04, 2012 12:12 am UTC

flicky1991 wrote:
thenonsequitur wrote:
Rotherian wrote:I've heard of a rule about not splitting infinitives. I've also heard of a rule about not ending a sentence with a preposition.


I might add that both these so-called rules are actually not based on real usage; they aren't part of any natural "formal" register. Both these rules are hold-overs from old poorly-conceived prescriptivist teachings of the past, and are now primarily just tools in a non-educated grammar-nazi's repertoire.

I agree with you except for "so-called rules" - they're rules, even if we choose not to obey them. :)


They're not actually rules; they're just something that were written into the famous grammer book "elements of style" in 1918, and they weren't even right when that book was written. Ending a sentence with prepositions and using split infinitives has in fact been correct grammar in English for hundreds of years, at least since Shakespeare, and it still is. The problem is that several generations of over-enthusiastic English teachers and newspaper editors have mistakenly taken that book as gospel and tried to enforce the bad rules onto students and writers, and has done a lot of harm to the English language in the process.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby jpk » Sat Aug 04, 2012 1:21 am UTC

Yosarian2 wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:
thenonsequitur wrote:
Rotherian wrote:I've heard of a rule about not [url=http://en.wikipedia.org
They're not actually rules; they're just something that were written into the famous grammer book "elements of style" in 1918


I've been hearing this in the last year or two, that they originate in Strunk - mostly from Strunk-bashers.
I was always under the impression that the schoolamarmish prohibitions on split infinitives and final prepositions were rather older than that. Wikipedia cites a source placing the split infinitive prohibition "in the 19th century" - if that's true, then Strunk's off the hook on that one. A bit of searching finds sources debunking the "old myth" that prepositions must precede the words they are associated with (!), and therefore cannot end a phrase - one of them in 1928. Ten years is a very short time to build up an "old myth", so I suspect that once again, Elements of Style is not to blame, and these both go back to at least the early 19th century and possibly earlier.

I agree entirely, of course, that they are not rules of grammar in the sense that "you can't raise across a trace" is a rule of grammar.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby thenonsequitur » Sat Aug 04, 2012 1:39 am UTC

Strunk & White did an important part in popularizing it, but it was John Dryden who set the ball rolling in 1672.

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/language ... 04454.html

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby hotaru » Sat Aug 04, 2012 2:54 am UTC

evac156 wrote:And if you scale it by this:

| 0.001 1 1 |
| 1 0.001 1 |
| 1 1 0.001 |

It would then be much easier to climb.

(Sorry, can't see how to do a table/matrix in this markup.)

[math]\begin{bmatrix}
0.001 & 1 & 1 \\
1 & 0.001 & 1 \\
1 & 1 & 0.001
\end{bmatrix}[/math]

Code: Select all

factorial product enumFromTo 1
isPrime n 
factorial (1) `mod== 1

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Mirkwood » Sat Aug 04, 2012 11:04 pm UTC

I interpreted the comic entirely differently and still found it hilarious.

See, I thought the convention on "formal languages" was referring to the use of formal speech and whatnot, with a lot of prescriptivist rules about how to use it. The joke in the alt text is funny because so-called "grammar nazis" often insist on the use of formal "rules" in informal situations, i.e. they don't recognize that the "correctness" of language depends on the context.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Futilitarian » Sun Aug 05, 2012 2:27 am UTC

I joined the forum because the alt text of the comic really raised my hackles. The "Grammar!" is context-sensitive, not context-free, since it's the context of the the Formal Languages Symposium that makes the pun work.

So while the grammar is context-sensitive, my hackles are surely oversensitive.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Trickster » Sun Aug 05, 2012 3:14 am UTC

evac156 wrote:You were a minor, in grad school, when you took linguistics? Some kind of child prodigy? :lol:

In my grad school program we were allowed to take one extra-disciplinary minor area of focus in coursework. The requirement was one major area and two minor areas. One of the minors was linguistics.

Sorry if that was confusing. Academia loves to reuse terminology for nonstandard purposes, just to piss off all the mathematicians I suspect.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Max™ » Sun Aug 05, 2012 3:49 am UTC

Trickster wrote:
evac156 wrote:You were a minor, in grad school, when you took linguistics? Some kind of child prodigy? :lol:

In my grad school program we were allowed to take one extra-disciplinary minor area of focus in coursework. The requirement was one major area and two minor areas. One of the minors was linguistics.

Sorry if that was confusing. Academia loves to reuse terminology for nonstandard purposes, just to piss off all the mathematicians I suspect.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby flicky1991 » Sun Aug 05, 2012 2:04 pm UTC

Yosarian2 wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:
thenonsequitur wrote:
Rotherian wrote:I've heard of a rule about not splitting infinitives. I've also heard of a rule about not ending a sentence with a preposition.


I might add that both these so-called rules are actually not based on real usage; they aren't part of any natural "formal" register. Both these rules are hold-overs from old poorly-conceived prescriptivist teachings of the past, and are now primarily just tools in a non-educated grammar-nazi's repertoire.

I agree with you except for "so-called rules" - they're rules, even if we choose not to obey them. :)


They're not actually rules; they're just something that were written into the famous grammer book "elements of style" in 1918, and they weren't even right when that book was written. Ending a sentence with prepositions and using split infinitives has in fact been correct grammar in English for hundreds of years, at least since Shakespeare, and it still is. The problem is that several generations of over-enthusiastic English teachers and newspaper editors have mistakenly taken that book as gospel and tried to enforce the bad rules onto students and writers, and has done a lot of harm to the English language in the process.

I agree that they're invalid. I agree we don't have to use them. I agree they don't correspond to actual usage. But they are rules.

If I say "everyone has to spit after saying the word 'suit'", then that's a rule. I doubt anyone will ever obey it, and most people seeing this post will probably forget it. But, in its own way, it is still a rule.
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Flumble
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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Flumble » Sun Aug 05, 2012 9:55 pm UTC

evac156 wrote:
HonoreDB wrote:Scaling Everest was, by far, the most amazing and transformative experience of my life.


And if you scale it by this:

| 0.001 1 1 |
| 1 0.001 1 |
| 1 1 0.001 |

It would then be much easier to climb.

Just to get this clear: you suggest to scale Everest's height to 0.001 its height plus 1 part its length plus 1 part its width? You monster :twisted:
I presume you meant this matrix:
[math]\begin{bmatrix}
0.001 & 0 & 0 \\
0 & 0.001 & 0 \\
0 & 0 & 0.001
\end{bmatrix}[/math]
carolineee wrote:For this comic, the joke is just that the word "grammar" doesn't really have a context here. Thus, it's a context free grammar ;)

Thank you for explainin the comic-only joke. :D IIRC Randall never makes a comic in which the joke relies on the alt-text.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby jpk » Mon Aug 06, 2012 4:14 am UTC

flicky1991 wrote:
Yosarian2 wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:
thenonsequitur wrote:
Rotherian wrote:I've heard of a rule about not
I agree that they're invalid. I agree we don't have to use them. I agree they don't correspond to actual usage. But they are rules.

If I say "everyone has to spit after saying the word 'suit'", then that's a rule. I doubt anyone will ever obey it, and most people seeing this post will probably forget it. But, in its own way, it is still a rule.


They're "rules", but they're not rules of grammar in the linguistic sense, more rules of politeness. They're rules in the sense that "utter the locally appropriate incantory phrase after another person sneezes in your vicinity" is a rule: it governs a linguistic utterance, but there's nothing about it that has anything to do with language, only behavior. They're not rules in the sense of the rules governing cliticization of "not" to "n't" are - these are the rules that tell us that
1) "I can't walk across the street if I want to"
must mean
2) "I am not able/allowed to walk across the street even if I wish to"
and can never mean
3)"I am allowed to not walk across the street if I so choose".

Clear now? There are rules, and rules. Rules about splitting infinitives are rules, but not rules of language.

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Max™ » Mon Aug 06, 2012 7:08 am UTC

So there are ruuruuus?
mu

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Re: 1090: "Formal Languages"

Postby Sn0zz » Mon Aug 06, 2012 2:47 pm UTC

That's one of the reasons I love XKCD (and the forum) so much: it tickles my inner geek, and when I don't get it, I learn stuff by finding out or reading the forums. :D


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