1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby *** » Fri Sep 14, 2012 5:20 am UTC

NHL goes from October-June. Then there is the off season where there are retirements, the draft, and further preparation for the upcoming season. So just assume if they're not sticking to the schedule, they are talking about hockey. ... Or you could just ask.

Go Red Sox... or, well, Pats and Bruins at this point.

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby Pfhorrest » Fri Sep 14, 2012 6:41 am UTC

VanI wrote:
BigglesPiP wrote:It has been suggested that Americans have limited knowledge of places that aren't America...

No, Americans have limited knowledge that there even are places that aren't America; there's a difference.

And to be fair, I could get on a highway and drive as fast as legally permitted for 48 hours straight, not even stopping for sleep, in as close to a straight line as the roads will permit, without leaving America. And I have actually done about 2/3 of that trip myself, in about 30hrs, speeding at up to double the limit for large portions of it, though to be fair gas stops were necessary -- for European comparison, that's about the same as a trip from London to Moscow. It's a pretty big place and very easy to have no first-hand experience of the things that are beyond its borders.

Granted, there are other countries closer to me than that, but while a Londoner can take a trip through the Chunnel and visit Paris, I can take a drive down the coast to... Tijuana. Whoop de friggin do. And in the radius of the distance I'd have to travel to visit Vancouver, probably the closest interesting foreign city, the bulk of that circle is either ocean or more America. About half of America, for that matter. Plus the less-hospitable parts of Mexico. Guadalajara doesn't quite make the cut.
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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby J L » Fri Sep 14, 2012 7:19 am UTC

As for distances, from my experience (comparing driving around in California and Nevada to driving around in Germany) the big difference is that except for the big urban areas like L.A., there are many highways almost empty and going in a virtually straight line. Plus, the landscape is mostly beautiful.

German highways have less lanes, and in contrast to what people believe, you can't drive as fast as you want most of the time. It's prohibited on most routes, and they're almost always crowded. Plus, you run into intersections and cities all the time, and half of the time, it's raining. In short, long distance drives, in many parts of Europe, are not an adventure, but a pain in the butt ;)

For example, London -- Moscow would be about the same distance as Dan Diego -- St Louis (about 2500 km straight, 2900 km on street). I don't know if you can make the St Louis Trip in 48 hours, but I'm pretty sure you can't make the Moscow trip in that time, not even counting getting through the darn tunnel: It would take you through Belgium (nice streets, but potentially lots of traffic), Germany (from west to east, not really an ideal route), Poland (don't really know about the streets there) and Belarus (don't know anything about it). Even if it's possible -- nobody does it.

Going south, on the other hand, you can easily spend half your trips waiting to get a chance to cross the Alps.

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby VectorZero » Fri Sep 14, 2012 8:25 am UTC

@Phorrest: you could do the same thing in Australia and still be on the same island. That doesn't stop Aussies from pissing it up in Europe.
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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby rmsgrey » Fri Sep 14, 2012 10:28 am UTC

mixh wrote:
KeithIrwin wrote:The non-US part doesn't really work well for quite a number of countries.

In Japan, it's far more likely to be baseball or sumo year-round. And the game with the round ball and the kicking isn't called "football" or "futbol" there. It's called "sakka". It's also called soccer in most of Austalia which is also just as likely (if not more so) to be arguing about Australian-Rules Football, Rugby, or Cricket. And, for the Indian subcontinent, the equivalent cheat-sheet would just say "Cricket" all year, not football. Soccer isn't an important sport in that part of the world. The British Isles also still have quite a number of cricket and rugby fans. And the points about Canada have already been made. Association Football may be the singular most popular game in the world, but that doesn't make it the most popular game in any given country.


In otherwords and at the risk of (deliberately) annoying many literate Norteamericanos, it's more of a cheat sheet for US conceptions of geography and culture:

{'US' : ['US', 'RoW'],
'RoW', ['European', 'Australasian', 'British Commonwealth', 'East Asian', 'South East Asian', 'Latin American', 'Canada', 'US'} # simplfied, wot, old bean ;-)

...

Your brackets don't match.

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby KarenRei » Fri Sep 14, 2012 2:57 pm UTC

The thing about driving across the US is... there's nothing to get in your way because there's nothing to see in most places. Don't get me wrong, there's definitely some beautiful places in the mountains and certain parts of the deserts in the US. But most of the US is just... nothing. Flat plains of corn and soybeans, or endless flat forests of identical-looking pines that you can't see past, or endless stretches of flat, identical desert scrub, on and on.

Also, there can be significant driving distances even in these "little" countries. Driving from the airport in Keflavík in Iceland on the shortest possible non-4wd loop around the country you can take and back to the airport is roughly the distance from Boston to Madison. Takes maybe 16 1/2 hours. And a heck of a lot more interesting drive, let me tell you ;) Not just the landscape is diverse but even the climate. The south side of the island has the wettest place in Europe (the mountains there average 10,000mm/yr). The north/northeast side is desert at low elevations, roughly equivalent to that of eastern New Mexico.

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby bmonk » Fri Sep 14, 2012 8:35 pm UTC

JimsMaher wrote:
Tova wrote:I don't get it.

Maybe the title should be "sport discussions according to Randall?"

A bit like the world map according to Americans thing. And not the one Randall did.


That seems to be a trend. Just consider the full title of project:

xkcd: According to Randall ...

In fact, there might a general form for that.
While some webcomic artists, bloggers, or other independent online periodical contributors may offer up the opinions of others or simple objective fact, there is a certain class of contributions which all could be appropriately subtitled: "According to <author>".
While in some mediums, such personal beliefs or opinions are shared with the implicit assumption that they are precisely that, some formats obscure the nature of the information being relayed.

In xkcd's case, it is clearly stated at the top of the front-page that the comic is satirical in nature. It is an artistic endeavor, and thereby subject to widely varying interpretations, perhaps by design, and such schemas are to be expected.
Regardless, when he put forth more earnest efforts on occasion (legit infographics: Money, Radiation Dose, screw it here's someone else's list: My favorite infographics by XKCD) ... such non-satirical efforts can lead to a slower reaction time when the satirical graphics are presented in the same format, on the same site.

And sometimes I think that there's outright controversy by design on the artist's part ...
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This post reminds me strongly about General Semantics, and its call to remember to index ideas by origin and date: Not "Sports Discussions" but rather "Sports Discussions [Randall]", or even "Sports Discussions [Randall, Sept. 2012]"--because someone else will have a different understanding or model.

KarenRei wrote:The thing about driving across the US is... there's nothing to get in your way because there's nothing to see in most places. Don't get me wrong, there's definitely some beautiful places in the mountains and certain parts of the deserts in the US. But most of the US is just... nothing. Flat plains of corn and soybeans, or endless flat forests of identical-looking pines that you can't see past, or endless stretches of flat, identical desert scrub, on and on.


Only because you are . . . driving. Get out of your car and stay a while. Even the prairies--the archetype of flat and boring--all look the same because you are going through them at 50+ mph. Up close, you can see the infinite variety of grasses, bushes, flowers, trees, insects, mammals, as well as towns, hills, clouds. . . .

VanI wrote:
BigglesPiP wrote:It has been suggested that Americans have limited knowledge of places that aren't America...

No, Americans have limited knowledge that there even are places that aren't America; there's a difference.

Speak for yourself. I know that there is a whole world out there that is not American, and I have always enjoyed its vast variety--cultures, languages, ecosystems, climates, economies, histories. True, many Americans are rather provincial. Oddly, I tend to find more of that on the coasts in some ways than in the vast middle. On the prairies, we have no delusions that we are self-sufficient.
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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby Mr Q » Sat Sep 15, 2012 3:11 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:And to be fair, I could get on a highway and drive as fast as legally permitted for 48 hours straight, not even stopping for sleep, in as close to a straight line as the roads will permit, without leaving America.


I live in Perth, Western Australia. Often described as the world's most isolated city. I could do that, and I wouldn't even see another city for more than 24 hours. Yet while West Australians are a little bit parochial (or in some cases a whole lot parochial), we do actually realise there is a rest of the world. Oh, and as someone else pointed out, I could drive for 48 hours, and there would be no route I could take of any sort that would end up in another country. Being in a big country is no excuse for not knowing the rest of the world...

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby jpers36 » Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:41 pm UTC

Mr Q wrote:I live in Perth, Western Australia. Often described as the world's most isolated city. I could do that, and I wouldn't even see another city for more than 24 hours. Yet while West Australians are a little bit parochial (or in some cases a whole lot parochial), we do actually realise there is a rest of the world. Oh, and as someone else pointed out, I could drive for 48 hours, and there would be no route I could take of any sort that would end up in another country. Being in a big country is no excuse for not knowing the rest of the world...


So your knowledge of Americans apparently boils down to "All Americans are Ugly Americans" ... That's cultural literacy right there.

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby VectorZero » Sun Sep 16, 2012 3:12 am UTC

Pretty sure that post contains neither "all" nor "ugly".
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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby flicky1991 » Sun Sep 16, 2012 6:43 am UTC

jpers36 wrote:
Mr Q wrote:I live in Perth, Western Australia. Often described as the world's most isolated city. I could do that, and I wouldn't even see another city for more than 24 hours. Yet while West Australians are a little bit parochial (or in some cases a whole lot parochial), we do actually realise there is a rest of the world. Oh, and as someone else pointed out, I could drive for 48 hours, and there would be no route I could take of any sort that would end up in another country. Being in a big country is no excuse for not knowing the rest of the world...


So your knowledge of Americans apparently boils down to "All Americans are Ugly Americans" ... That's cultural literacy right there.

All they said was that a lot of Americans don't know much about the rest of the world, which is true. They didn't say that all Americans are like that, and they didn't mention any of the other things you would need to be to be considered an "Ugly American". Ignorance isn't the same as rudeness.
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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby SerMufasa » Sun Sep 16, 2012 9:59 pm UTC

flicky1991 wrote:All they said was that a lot of Americans don't know much about the rest of the world, which is true.


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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby J L » Sun Sep 16, 2012 11:09 pm UTC

Sorry to bring this up, but most Republican candidates of the last years that made it to the screen.

That doesn't bear any statistic relevance, of course, but that's the origin of the cliché.

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby mgmfa » Thu Sep 20, 2012 6:07 am UTC

I just made a twitter feed like he mentioned in the alt text. Check out @nerdsportshelp
(Also, as an Indo-American, I can safely say that India has only cricket and soccer, and both are year round. Soccer alone seems to be more of a European and South American thing. Everywhere else has their own favorite sports depending on the place)

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby blowfishhootie » Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:24 pm UTC

blowfishhootie wrote:
ThirstyMonkey wrote:
blowfishhootie wrote:
ThirstyMonkey wrote:My baseball meter is rising as the Milwaukee Brewers are making a late run at a wild card spot after most people left them for dead back in July.


I'm sorry to have to break it to you, but no they aren't. :)

According to coolstandings.com, which compiles playoff percentages based on historical performances of teams trailing by the same number of games with the same number of games remaining (it is more complicated than that, because it also factors in strength of remaining schedule and other factors), the Brewers have just a 3 percent chance of making the playoffs. They are 4.5 games back with only 20 games to play, which is almost insurmountable in any circumstance, but the real deal-breaker is that there are four teams ahead of them for the second wild card spot, so they need four teams to collapse AND they need to be red-hot. Very unlikely.

http://www.coolstandings.com/baseball_s ... n=2012&i=1


Well as of just a few minutes ago, they're now only down 4 games (effectively 5 to the Cardinals due to the tie-breaking procedures, though a three way tie would give us a chance at a one or two game playoff). That has brought up our chances to 4.0 percent. And as much as baseball can focus at times on the numbers and fancy statistics, the old adage Anything can happen still rings true in hearts and minds of fans. The collapses of the Red Sox and the Braves last year are two of the five worst in baseball history.


Yeah but the difference between last year and this year is, the Rays and Cardinals only had to overtake one team. On Sept. 1, the Braves had an 8.5 game lead over the Cardinals for the NL wild card, but there were no other teams between the two, so St. Louis only needed one team to have a bad month, not four. Same situation in the AL - the Rays only had to overtake the Red Sox (or the Yankees, as two of the three were going to make it to the playoffs).

Anyway, good luck, but it would probably be an even more historic turnaround for the Brewers to make the postseason this year than it was for the Cardinals to make it last year.

EDIT: According to coolstandings.com, the Cards' playoff odds on this day last year were about 7 percent, and the Rays' odds were about 11 percent.

EDIT 2: The Cards' lowest playoff odds last year was at 2 percent on August 27. The Rays' lowest was 0.5 percent on Sept. 3. The Brewers' lowest this year has been less than 0.1 percent on August 25, and as recently as Sept. 6, less than a week ago, they were at 0.4 percent. This would be a quite historic turnaround if they somehow made it.


Well ThirstyMonkey, your Brewers are doing their best to make me eat my words. They're only 2.5 games back with 14 to play now. Still a long shot, but with only the Dodgers (half a game better than the Brewers) and Cardinals in the way, it's possible. Their playoff odds are up to 14 percent now, third best for one of the two wild card spots behind Atlanta and St. Louis. Cardinals have the easiest schedule in baseball the rest of the way though, so still doesn't look good.

(P.S. - I'm a St Louis native and big Cards fan. :) )

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby LaSargenta » Thu Sep 20, 2012 2:43 pm UTC

Can I just say "Hockey Lockout"?

*whimper*

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby wolf99 » Thu Sep 20, 2012 3:55 pm UTC

so what happened to

Rugby, Aussie rules, hockey, gaelic football, hurling, camogie, ice skating, horse-y things, formula one, NASCAR, boxing, lacrosse, snooker, golf, cricket and so on

Even with football you can have various competitions such as premiership (per country, spain, italy, france and UK, being some of the top talking points), championship (again, per country), european, south american, world and more, just in case you ever meet a person and nothing more in common with them than knowing their name, where ever you are in the world you can nearly ALWAYS say "Well, did you see that performance last night?"

Come to think of it however, that could also cover a multitude of other non-sporting events such as theatre, musical shows even the weather (though admittedly some countries are able to get more conversational mileage out of this than others...

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby Mr Q » Sun Sep 23, 2012 1:27 pm UTC

jpers36 wrote:
Mr Q wrote:I live in Perth, Western Australia. Often described as the world's most isolated city. I could do that, and I wouldn't even see another city for more than 24 hours. Yet while West Australians are a little bit parochial (or in some cases a whole lot parochial), we do actually realise there is a rest of the world. Oh, and as someone else pointed out, I could drive for 48 hours, and there would be no route I could take of any sort that would end up in another country. Being in a big country is no excuse for not knowing the rest of the world...


So your knowledge of Americans apparently boils down to "All Americans are Ugly Americans" ... That's cultural literacy right there.


I've never claimed that. My main experience of Americans was my ex - a girl from small town Michigan, who was neither ugly, nor culturally illiterate. That said, I did meet her here in Perth where she'd been living for a few years well before I met her. As an example, she was a great example of cultural literacy - but I don't expect that she was necessarily any more typical than those who (to quote the Disposable Heroes of Hiphopracy) think "Central America means Kansas". For the most part, I'd expect that Americans would be less culturally literate on average than some other nations, mostly due to the US being effectively a net cultural exporter - the rest of the world sees a lot more American product than people in the US would see of the rest of the world. As a result there would be less exposure to learn from - but not none - and that the size of America (at least the geographic size) should really be irrelevant. The *population* size on the other hand would have an effect.

My comment was in reply to someone who said effectively that because the US is so big it's an excuse to have a lack of experience of the rest of the world - which if it were true should apply doubly to people in a country of very similar size, and particularly to people who live in my part of it, where we've got one smallish city in a state that's 8.3 times the size of Texas.

In the context of the comic, I can understand why an American might see the world that way. I wouldn't expect most Americans to have ever heard of Australian Rules football (or hand-and-foot-egg if you prefer) for instance, or even if they've heard of it, to know anything at all about it - it's the dominant sport only in an area that has about 10 million people in a fairly minor nation. But I would expect that if you see a diversity of sport in the US, that you'd expect a similar diversity of sport in other parts of the world. Here in Perth we have two Australian Rules teams, a Rugby Union team, a couple of cricket teams in different versions of the game, a soccer team and a basketball team at national (or supra-national) level. Oddly enough, the soccer team is probably one of the less followed.

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Re: 1107: "Sports Cheat Sheet"

Postby LtPowers » Mon Sep 24, 2012 1:06 pm UTC

da Doctah wrote:
LtPowers wrote:
Why do you say a strike is bad in baseball? Sure, it's bad for one team, but it's good for the other, isn't it?

Powers &8^]


It's bad for the people who shelled out big bucks for season tickets.


Not if the home team is pitching.


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