Online Gaming - an apologia

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seladore
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Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby seladore » Sun Apr 13, 2008 10:58 am UTC

The usual apologies if this has been discussed before.

My question is this... Why are there so many negative/hostile feelings towards online gamers + the online gaming culture?
First of all I need to point out that I don't play online games - I have tried them, and found them pretty boring. (This is beside the issue, however - I'm just letting you know of my bias on the situation).

I have read many articles / blogs / whatever talking about the sad tragedy of online gaming, and how people are 'wasting their lives in virtual worlds'. These pieces invariably use (what I would consider to be) emotive and inappropriate terms such as 'addicted', and say things like 'gamers are unable to distinguish the real world from the virtual'.

I don't understand why online games come under such fire. Sure, people could be doing better things with their lives - but that is true of most activities. If person x was to play World of Warcraft for 25 hours a week, s/he would be a 'slavering addict', whereas if someone was to, say, spend 25 hours a week reading, they would just be 'into literature', and would be lauded as someone actively developing themselves intellectually. Even more to the point, if someone was to spend 25 hours a week in front of the television, this would be accepted as normal behavior.

Any thoughts?

P.s. I realise that I have made somewhat of a strawman of my opponent to online gaming, but I have read enough polemics on the issue that I think the invented quotes match at least some opinions.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Gelsamel » Sun Apr 13, 2008 11:04 am UTC

Online Gaming is probably one of the biggest areas (of gaming) where people invest time into. The only thing that comes close is people who get into FPS or Fighter Competitions, but then that's just the "elite".

I think because Online Gaming is so popular, and SO GOOD at doing what books and movies try to do that people feel the need to take it down. Lots of people feel the need to take down lots of things for what ever reason, I'm sure there is thousands of reasons that people say that stuff, so I don't think you'll find a definitive reason honestly. It's mostly just what would fall under the term of "hating".
"Give up here?"
- > No
"Do you accept defeat?"
- > No
"Do you think games are silly little things?"
- > No
"Is it all pointless?"
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Bruce » Sun Apr 13, 2008 12:08 pm UTC

Books have an end. Read another is different to the one you just read. I have seen people throw away their lives to warcrack. It is a very real and very serious problem. I do not hate the gamers, any more than I hate people who have other serious problems with their lives*.

* Note: I am not saying everyone who plays any MMORPG has issues, but that these are the cases (and they are significant in number) which are the cause for concern.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Gelsamel » Sun Apr 13, 2008 12:51 pm UTC

The only people I've heard about throwing their lives away was that crazy guy who committed suicide, but he was crazy.
"Give up here?"
- > No
"Do you accept defeat?"
- > No
"Do you think games are silly little things?"
- > No
"Is it all pointless?"
- > No
"Do you admit there is no meaning to this world?"
- > No

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby anterovipunen » Sun Apr 13, 2008 1:31 pm UTC

its highly addictive and lots of people have obsessive personalities.... i'd be scared to start playing world of warcraft, how wierd is that! call of duty on the other hand..... :mrgreen:

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Indon » Sun Apr 13, 2008 2:56 pm UTC

I'd say, because it's new.

Comics got a lot of flak for corrupting the youth back in their day, for instance. Nowadays, we, think, "What? Yeah, sure, like books but with pretty pictures, sounds awfully satanic to me, hah!" but back then there were people who seriously thought that - which led to the Comics Code.

New things, especially new things that young people enjoy doing, are going to get negative publicity like that, far as I can tell.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby SlyReaper » Sun Apr 13, 2008 3:19 pm UTC

I spent about 3 years playing Eve-Online before I quit a couple of months ago. I considered myself to be more than a casual gamer too. For the most part, I considered it to be a good source of entertainment. I do not consider the time wasted any more than if I'd spent that time doing archery, playing go or chess, watching telly, getting drunk, or indeed, reading books.

It was not all-consuming because during that time, I graduated from college/high school, got accepted into Warwick Uni (one of the top-ten universities in the UK) and am currently working towards my maths masters degree. So much for "wasting my life".

I think the hostility towards online gaming comes from the stereotype of players being somewhat geeky people, unable to lead a normal life because of their stunted social skills. I obviously don't hate online gaming so it's difficult for me to understand the mindset of somebody who does, but I imagine the geeky stereotype has a lot to do with it. Of course it doesn't help when you hear about the occasional guy who drops dead at his computer because he's been playing for so long he starved to death.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Freakish » Sun Apr 13, 2008 8:02 pm UTC

I think it's just ignorance. Just like how people will compare Guitar Hero to actually playing the guitar and then criticize you for playing Guitar Hero rather then a guitar. It's like telling a COD player to go join the army.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby tantalum » Sun Apr 13, 2008 8:21 pm UTC

I feel it's just part of the bigger stereotype against nerds thing. It IS socially acceptable to mock nerds, but it is not socially acceptable to mock the majority of the population, especially when you target something that is so central to their lives. It's all good fun, until you're the one being made fun of. The most insecure people are the ones that have the most to lose by being told the truth. (This applies to both gamers and couch potatoes)

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Malice » Sun Apr 13, 2008 9:01 pm UTC

There is a real danger present with MMOs. It's not really what the players do within the game, it's the fact that it is a game. Virtual accomplishments < real accomplishments. And like someone said, when that game lasts forever...

Basically, it's not a problem until it's a problem. When your online job is taking up more of your time than your real job, there's a problem.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Freakish » Sun Apr 13, 2008 10:12 pm UTC

Virtual accomplishments are real accomplishments.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Kaiyas » Sun Apr 13, 2008 10:20 pm UTC

Freakish wrote:Virtual accomplishments are real accomplishments.

I think what Malice was trying to say was that virtual accomplishments are very minor compared to other ones in real life. (e.g. passing with a high GPA is more important than leveling up 5 more times.)
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Freakish » Sun Apr 13, 2008 10:25 pm UTC

Kaiyas wrote:
Freakish wrote:Virtual accomplishments are real accomplishments.

I think what Malice was trying to say was that virtual accomplishments are very minor compared to other ones in real life. (e.g. passing with a high GPA is more important than leveling up 5 more times.)


I disagree. The value of an accomplishment is depended on how much you've put into it.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Bruce » Sun Apr 13, 2008 10:46 pm UTC

There has been some talk of geeks/nerds being targetting but I do not think that is the case. WoW is very mainstream, and my impression is that it is the people who are relatively new to gaming who are not able to manage it. Those who grew up playing Civ have learnt to manage gaming while still doing things like going to school, but when you get people in their 20s and suddenly give them WoW relationships and jobs suffer.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Gelsamel » Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:04 am UTC

Freakish wrote:
Kaiyas wrote:
Freakish wrote:Virtual accomplishments are real accomplishments.

I think what Malice was trying to say was that virtual accomplishments are very minor compared to other ones in real life. (e.g. passing with a high GPA is more important than leveling up 5 more times.)


I disagree. The value of an accomplishment is depended on how much you've put into it.


Exactly!

You guys have NO IDEA how GOOD it feels to FINALLY FUCKING KILL VAELASTRASZ back when that instance first came out in WoW.
"Give up here?"
- > No
"Do you accept defeat?"
- > No
"Do you think games are silly little things?"
- > No
"Is it all pointless?"
- > No
"Do you admit there is no meaning to this world?"
- > No

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Wormwood » Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:48 am UTC

Freakish wrote:
Kaiyas wrote:
Freakish wrote:Virtual accomplishments are real accomplishments.

I think what Malice was trying to say was that virtual accomplishments are very minor compared to other ones in real life. (e.g. passing with a high GPA is more important than leveling up 5 more times.)


I disagree. The value of an accomplishment is depended on how much you've put into it.


Accomplishment is also a social thing. If a lot of people place a high value on a certain accomplishment, then it is worth more to attempt that accomplishment. Passing with a high GPA is worth more, and requires more effort, than leveling up 5 times. The value of an accomplishment depends somewhat on the consequences of that accomplishment. A high GPA has many consequences, such as respect among friends and family, more opportunities for career and continuing education, and the likelihood that a stranger will pay attention to your words. (I don't really know how GPA works, I'm just assuming)

The value of an accomplishment is dependent on the effort you put in, what you take away from it, the way other people perceive that accomplishment, and the consequences of it.

I think. I have no real opinion either way on the matter, this is just me trying to sort things out in my head.

Online gaming is a form of entertainment, similar to other video games, watching television, reading a book, or participating in a non-essential activity with other people with the intent of having fun. I can't see any real difference between moderate use of online games, and me playing volleyball once a week, smoking a joint occasionally, reading Harry Potter, and masturbating. If something impacts on your life too much, you may want to change your habits. Other than that, why bother? Go and have fun in a way you see fit.

Some of the opinions about gamers may stem from the beliefs about drugs common in society. Playing WoW for one day a week, say all day on a Sunday, every week, could be seen as similar to going to a massive party and getting drunk, with less health risks. (Perhaps. Or maybe not. Now that I think about it, that not really true).

So, from what I can gather from my conflicting thoughts on the matter, online games are seen by society as having no value other than entertainment, and possibly being dangerous. As usually happens, certain people take this opinion to the extreme and claim that online games are addictive and mind-altering. Others believe them, and it snowballs. I say, ignore them, and get on with your gaming. Argue and protest only if it becomes necessary, say in the case of a proposed ban on online games.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby ICDB » Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:50 am UTC

On real vs virtual:
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Seems like it's that type of thing.
At the same time, I say it doesn't matter where you get your satisfaction, as long as you aren't fucking up your real life.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby tantalum » Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:58 am UTC

I think we are all using our own definitions of what people "should want" out of life. Some people go with the popular opinion: a good life is one where one is popular, rich, has a good spouse, can have what he wants. Some people go a more general version: a good life is one where you are happy. I'd be interested in seeing what a nihilist's view on online gaming is. The bottom line is that whether you think online gaming is bad depends on what you think is good. (sounds so simple, doesn't it? o.o)

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby lorenith » Mon Apr 14, 2008 2:33 am UTC

Gelsamel wrote:Exactly!

You guys have NO IDEA how GOOD it feels to FINALLY FUCKING KILL VAELASTRASZ back when that instance first came out in WoW.


After nearly killing him 5 times, and getting pwned by minor lag.

Anyway, online games are fun, but the addiction component to them can be very bad for a person. I know two people personally who have had relationships ruined by WoW (not directly, but through the fact that their SO plays it). But at the same time, I know someone who's husband plays it a lot, and she plays puzzle pirates, but they still have happy non virtual times in their lives together.

I don't think MMO's and other things are bad, but sometimes I think there needs to be a limit to how often/long one gets to play. Because the problems they cause to people in real life are very bad at times, even if they aren't perceived as real problems by those effected.

Last time I played WoW I policed myself very heavily to make sure I didn't get sucked into it (again). Once was enough and I learned my lesson, but a lot of people don't, and that's why MMO's get bad press at times I think.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Lord Bob » Mon Apr 14, 2008 3:54 am UTC

If the people who spend huge amount of time on video games are content with their lives, I don't see the point in trying to change them. Personally, I think it's a waste of a life. On the other hand, what constitutes as a worthy way to spend one's life is subjective. They could easily tell me that I'm the one who is missing out on life.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Malice » Mon Apr 14, 2008 4:08 am UTC

Freakish wrote:
Kaiyas wrote:
Freakish wrote:Virtual accomplishments are real accomplishments.

I think what Malice was trying to say was that virtual accomplishments are very minor compared to other ones in real life. (e.g. passing with a high GPA is more important than leveling up 5 more times.)


I disagree. The value of an accomplishment is depended on how much you've put into it.


I'd say accomplishments have intrinsic value, unrelated to how they are perceived by society (something is still an accomplishment even if nobody knows about it) and how difficult it was (getting elected President, even if it was really easy, is still a higher accomplishment than making a sandwich, even if it was really hard).

Like I said, it's the fact that they are virtual. If Bob was actually learning spells and killing trolls, nobody would bug him about it; but because he enjoys accomplishing things which aren't "real", at the expense of things which are, he's going to get shit for it, and rightly so in my opinion.

After all, being a productive member of WoW means you are a less productive member of society. Real accomplishments tend to give back; a college graduate contributes to the economy and may end up teaching others what he has learned; whereas an accomplishment in the game usually only has meaning within the game.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby klimtogger » Fri Apr 18, 2008 8:57 am UTC

About the 'wasting their lives in virtual worlds' thing, I'm pretty sure plenty of people all around the world log on to WoW or some other MMO and fool around with their friends through it. To me, MMO's like WoW can potentially be a very good medium for socializing with other people. After all, just being there and paying to play generally establishes at least one common interest amongst the people you meet that being you like to play games.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Gunfingers » Fri Apr 18, 2008 3:06 pm UTC

I'm a computer programmer, which means i work with computer programmers, which means both i and most of the people i know are big into the gaming thing. I've actually noticed similarities between gaming and drug use. As many have noted, you can play video games and do so regularly and still be a functional and well-adjusted person. You can do the same thing on heroin.

Now i'm not saying this makes gaming wrong. I wouldn't judge for using heroin, either. But for every person that makes it worse, there's somebody who doesn't know how to balance it right and takes it too far. Even the well-adjusted can be driven to make bad decisions. There have been several occasions where i put off my homework because i wanted to play Battle for Wesnoth.

In short i believe that the addiction thing is a very real threat with online gaming, though it is certainly not justification to legislate against them.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby 3tard » Sat Apr 19, 2008 5:30 am UTC

Okay, I am an ex-evercrack addict (evercrack 2 to be precise). There are two main ways to look at online gaming. this is how I saw it 2-3 years ago when I was into it.
I bought the game after hearing reviews about the first expansion pack because I wanted in on the fun. It was a fun game with good graphics for its time and the community seemed to be much better than the runescape trolls I was once accustomed to. I took my time figuring out the game, getting assistance from more experienced players who were pleasant and had this veteran confidence to them. One day I thought, I could be one of them, a respected member of this community, helping out the newer, less experienced people.
Meanwhile in the real world, I was starting my first day of school as a student in a new district. I didnt know any of the fads, or any of the people. I tried to use the online game's model for learning the ropes. This online community taught me that most people are kind, helpful, and patient, and that those who weren't and made trouble for you could be removed from your world with the report button. When the inevitable middle school trouble came up (the trouble might not have been so harsh if I hadn't used some internet social graces to begin with), I pushed the report button and got half of my peers in some pretty bad trouble.
As I got up in levels, I slowly became an idolized member of society. I finally felt accepted and important, as new players would hear from other new players that I could take them around the map and show them where cool things were. I joined a guild with the most colorful, familial bunch of people I have ever met. They were supportive, trustworthy, and a few of them were married couples with children. Without the experience of opening up with those people online, I may have never been able to open up to people in real life after I had moved on from the game.
While all this was happening, I still had school, and responsibilities. Doing thankless repetitive math problems and menial grammar worksheets seemed less exciting than being a hero and shepherd of the weak on my game, so I chose the latter. As a result, my grades slipped horribly, causing my parents to question if this game was write for me. They started limiting my hours using parental controls in the game, but I was able to get around them without my parents finding out. While my grades were suffering, I was learning to lie and cheat the system to feed my short-sighted appetite.
After doing many instances with different people in the high level dungeons. I learned of this whole breed of endgame content chasers known as the raiding guild. The generation of seasoned explorers I helped build could take my place as the shepherd of the weak and those that I had grown to love in my hometown guild wished me farewell and the best of luck. I was about to join my first crusade. I bought myself a headset so I could actually talk to people, which expanded my social comfort level even further. I soon became a respected member of this casual raiding unit. We would do a casual small group zone every day until our big raid came, at which point we would put our skill and cooperation to the test. After a while, my name became pretty well known in my world. "Hey its you, the guy on the top of the damage charts for one of the leading raid guilds, you must be very good." I was a celebrity, toting around my rare accessories, and my exclusive bling.
During this portion, my 'casual raid group' became 'leading raid group'. Instead of having a big raid once a week we would start doing it twice and eventually thrice a week. I stayed up past midnight making sure the zone was completed, at the expense of my sleep habits. My family commitments became less important than my guildmates getting the cool procing gear in this one zone so we could deal enough damage to kill the final monster before our tank was killed. I was a junkie and at last I crashed. My parents had enough of this instability and they begged me to quit. I eventually did quit after several long reflections. Said a permanent farewell to all the friends I had met throughout the 2 years spent on the game, then, I shut it off for good. A form of withdrawal kicked in less than a month later. All the friends that I had were gone, and I felt awfully alone, then I hit my lowest point, where I had an emotional breakdown and started to seriously consider suicide. After a few hours in the hospital, and some tough decisions being discussed (do I spend time in a mental hospital, go to a school for emotionally troubled kids?) I went home. I know it sounds silly that quitting a game can make someone go that far, but all of my closest friends were all of a sudden gone, and without a medium through which I could keep in touch. They were essentially dead.

Epilouge:

I cant say that my online gaming experience, or any online game experience is bad. It taught me to expand my comfort zone, to make me a social person. It helped shape me into who I am today, a smart, kind, and well-adjusted teen. And although it was the cause of some adversity in my life, and if things were a little different it might have gotten the best of me, it didn't. And I can still take life lessons and strength from the hardships I have suffered. I think that everybody who has been through a online game fixation, if they thought about it, could take something good from it. Take from this what you will, because even though I learned something valuable from it, people dont walk into online games expecting a life molding experience.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby klimtogger » Sat Apr 19, 2008 5:59 am UTC

You aren't alone when it comes to meeting great people over such a game or becoming respectable people through it and learning from it. This sort of thing happens all the time with all kinds of people. The last time I played something like this, I met a set of friends I still talk to sometimes today. While it wasn't as big as evercrack or its community, it was a small one made of about 150 or so. Amongst these 150 people, tight knit groups and cliques formed. Many times I could come home from school from the friends I knew in person and sign on to hang out with another valued group of people. In fact, I spent some late nights during the summer just partying and fooling around with these guys over a ventrilo sever one of them provided. In game, you could walk around you would know everyone, how they acted, their reputations, etc. All in all it was like a private hang out except you could go to it anytime you wanted. You would log on, obviously play a bit, and socialize.

Sadly, this for the most part came to an end when the owner shut down the server and moved on. Plenty of people were asking questions concerning his reasons or whether or not they could run the server themselves to keep this community together. A few people even compared its community to their high school life or memories of it. In the end, it came to an end and people just moved on. Chances to meet people who you find interesting and have common ground with don't come too often, especially if you are confined to the people you know at school.

To me, playing MMO's by yourself, wasting away to get that next level, isn't what makes it so fun. Its the people you play with and become friends with. More than half the time I spent "playing" that game was chatting and fooling around.

While things like this can become an addiction, by attaching such a negative connotation to it sometimes can be felt like an attack on you and your friends who take great joy in it. Games can be dangerous sure, but if kept in hand and under control, they serve their main purpose, which is to entertain, very well.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Kaiyas » Sun Apr 20, 2008 2:44 am UTC

klimtogger wrote:You aren't alone when it comes to meeting great people over such a game or becoming respectable people through it and learning from it. This sort of thing happens all the time with all kinds of people. The last time I played something like this, I met a set of friends I still talk to sometimes today. While it wasn't as big as evercrack or its community, it was a small one made of about 150 or so. Amongst these 150 people, tight knit groups and cliques formed. Many times I could come home from school from the friends I knew in person and sign on to hang out with another valued group of people. In fact, I spent some late nights during the summer just partying and fooling around with these guys over a ventrilo sever one of them provided. In game, you could walk around you would know everyone, how they acted, their reputations, etc. All in all it was like a private hang out except you could go to it anytime you wanted. You would log on, obviously play a bit, and socialize.

It's not even limited to RPGs. I used to play a few different FPS's, and I knew many of the members of one gaming clan, so I'd hang with them, mess around, etc. Since many of the people who visited the server were regulars, most people knew a lot of other people. Two things you definitely take away from FPS's are humility and respect. Otherwise, your reputation is simply gonna be that on an asshole. Sure, skills earn respect, but so does attitude. Perhaps this is influenced by my old gaming clan, where recruiting had one major policy: "Skill can be taught, attitude cannot."

My 2 cents.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Velifer » Tue Apr 22, 2008 8:37 pm UTC

Online gamers get a measure of negative attention from the mainstream for various reasons. Gamers have their own in-grouping behavior and cultural norms, much of which seems pretty damn obnoxious to an outside observer. Negative stereotypes are pervasive and confirmed by experience all too often.

Let's start with language: "N00bz" and "PWND!!1!" are not considered mature means of expressing oneself by most tweed-wearing English professors.

Stereotypes? A darkened room adds to the suspension of disbelief and atmosphere while playing, but please get out of your mom's basement sometime.

I could go on, but the point is, gamers don't act like everyone else. When you violate the collective cultural norms, you incur the unpleasant side of the mainstream's out-grouping normative bitch slap.

Oh, and the whole bit about making friends online could lead into threads upon threads about the nature of friendship, depth of connection, emotional ties, and relationships online. There's a fine and probably arbitrary line between "friendship" and "a stranger you're playing a game with." Making a big deal about leaving friends when you unplug the game comes off as very emotionally immature to most people. [current definition of most people: me and the majority I assume think like me.]

So as far as why gamers catch hell, there's a few ideas from a closet gamer who stays in the closet because he doesn't consider himself part of the gamer culture, and would prefer not to be treated as such by the mainstream culture.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Kachi » Tue Apr 22, 2008 9:31 pm UTC

I disagree. The value of an accomplishment is depended on how much you've put into it.


If I may suggest a correction, I think it's how much you reap, not sow--- and that, I think, is a problem that some people have with online gaming (certain players, not critics). I played FFXI for years and only just this last year really started to step away from the game.

The problem isn't that people are investing a lot of time into the game, but that many of them invest a lot of time in the game and get very little out of it that's positive. They'll put a lot of effort into doing things that they don't really enjoy-- or even hate-- just for a fleeting moment of success when they finally defeat that certain boss or get that rare item. Then that moment is gone, and they're left with a virtual trophy that will vanish when they finally close their account. Their only reward was a few brief moments of satisfaction for hours-- cumulatively months-- of grueling frustration and anguish.

I would say that online gaming is bad for many people that are drawn to it, but not bad for those who are able to enjoy it for what it is-- a game. Even during the latter days of my playtime after much conscious effort to refrain from it, I found that there were moments when I was genuinely upset by something that happened in the game. It was difficult sometimes to keep the perspective that it was just a game, and it was supposed to be fun, and I know that this was especially true for many of the people I knew.

It takes a level of personal and emotional responsibility to be able to make long-term online gaming an overall positive experience, something many people don't have, especially when they're young. What is sad is that it's really not inherent to online gaming-- it's just the way most of these games are made. Rather than continually introduce enjoyable, satisfying content, they bait players with new tasks that take unreasonable amounts of time and effort because it's far easier to produce that kind of content. You know, grinding. Most people would agree that grinding is neither enjoyable nor especially rewarding. They do it anyway because they have to so that their character will be leet.

That's been my take on the problem with online gaming. I actually developed a game concept that circumvents those problems and would have longevity without the requisite "addiction" to character stat progression, but like most of my game concepts it'll never see the light of day because I have no aptitude or interest in programming.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby TheBeeCeeEmm » Wed Apr 23, 2008 8:58 am UTC

When people bash "online games", they're talking about MMOs. Let's get that straight. No other game genre comes close to being so addictive.

I think this issue of "wasting" your life playing it ties into the bigger argument of what your purpose in life is. If it's just to have fun, then playing (a) games all day might be just as "productive" as working on a thesis, if the end goal of what that thesis will help you earn is just as fun as playing an MMO right now.

I recently quit an MMO (that will remained unnamed) that I played for over 4 years and had over 300 days of playtime in. Do I regret all the time I spent in it? No - it wasn't my biggest problem, honestly. It wasn't because I played an MMO every day for multiple hours that I neglected my real life, I had plenty of time when I wasn't playing to get stuff done, but the game was just what pushed me to complete procrastination.

In short, I don't regret "wasting" my life on an MMO for over 7200 hours, and I don't think I would go back in time and stop myself from playing even if I could.

But I will say that in the just over 2 weeks since I've quit, I've gotten more accomplished than I would have in 2 months while playing.
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Jack Saladin » Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:05 am UTC

When people bash "online games", they're talking about MMOs. Let's get that straight. No other game genre comes close to being so addictive.

People starve to death playing Starcraft and Counter-Strike. Regularly.

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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby Kaiyas » Thu Apr 24, 2008 4:08 am UTC

Fearbears?! wrote:
When people bash "online games", they're talking about MMOs. Let's get that straight. No other game genre comes close to being so addictive.

People starve to death playing Starcraft and Counter-Strike. Regularly.

Those are the exceptions, not the rule. Starcraft, because Korea pretty much worships it, and Counter-Strike as the world's most popular FPS. However, FPS and RTS differ from RPG in that there is not so much development (e.g. no quests, few if any level ups, etc.).
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Re: Online Gaming - an apologia

Postby TheBeeCeeEmm » Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:23 am UTC

Fearbears?! wrote:
When people bash "online games", they're talking about MMOs. Let's get that straight. No other game genre comes close to being so addictive.

People starve to death playing Starcraft and Counter-Strike. Regularly.


Regularly? Please.

Comparing any other genre to the MMO genre is only possible if you've never played one before.
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