The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

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addams
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby addams » Mon Aug 25, 2014 12:13 am UTC

CorruptUser wrote:
KnightExemplar wrote:Dandelions are found to have high-quality rubber particles in their roots.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/08/ ... LN20140820

Its such an easy plant to grow (its harder to keep your lawn free of Dandelions...). So if a use can be found for this pesky plant, all the better!


Umm... they are edible. If you run out food, you can eat the dandelion leaves and the taproot. It's a poverty food, but hey, better humble pie than death.

Don't be such a pessimist.
The Dandelion Flower makes an interesting wine.

Things we like to eat with wine like to eat Dandelion.
Cows, Pigs, Rabbits, Sheep.

oK. ok.
Dandelion leaf make good compost for growing corn and squash and for holding soil in place so it does not blow away.
Like real soil used to.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

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Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Link » Sat Aug 30, 2014 7:38 pm UTC

Brain-to-brain communication is now a reality. It's early days, of course, but you have to start somewhere.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby addams » Sat Aug 30, 2014 10:27 pm UTC

Link wrote:Brain-to-brain communication is now a reality. It's early days, of course, but you have to start somewhere.

What a wild ride that was.
I might need to read it, again.

What are we going to do with That? I wonder.
Of course, it will get better and better.

As soon as we figure out what it is.

Oh, Tell me, Sci Fi readers.
How will we use this?

The words, "That's what I thought you said."
Will become, "That's what I thought for you to say."
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Tue Oct 07, 2014 3:29 pm UTC

Police officers in Dubai will soon be able to identify suspects wanted for crimes just by looking at them.

Using Google Glass and a custom-developed facial recognition software, Dubai police will be able to capture photos of people around them and search their faces in a database of people wanted for crimes, according to a recent Reuters report. When a match is made in the database, the Glass device will receive a notification.

Although the project will initially be rolled out to traffic police, the devices will eventually be given to detectives as well, according to Reuters.

Facial recognition for Glass seems like a dream tool for law enforcement, especially considering that Glass now provides native support for blink-enabled control of the camera. With the Wink feature, the Glass unit takes photos when the user winks. If police officers using the device choose to activate the Wink feature, they could take photos without using their hands or voice commands. Theoretically, everyone within the vicinity of a police officer could be subjected to a check for any connection to unpaid parking tickets or outstanding warrants, and they'll have no idea if their photos are being taken or their faces are being searched in a database.

What's particularly interesting about the project is that facial recognition technology is banned by the Google Glass developer policy. After a company called FacialNetwork showcased its own facial recognition app for Glass last year, Google clarified that the app violated its policy. The section of the policy that addresses such technology seems to disqualify the Dubai police force's plan for Glass:

"Don't use the camera or microphone to cross-reference and immediately present personal information identifying anyone other than the user, including use cases such as facial recognition and voice print. Glassware that do this will not be approved at this time."

Google also addressed privacy concerns regarding facial recognition with Glass in March, mentioning it in a blog post debunking common myths about the technology.

"Myth 5: Glass does facial recognition (and other dodgy things) Nope. That’s not true. As we’ve said before, regardless of technological feasibility, we made the decision based on feedback not to release or even distribute facial recognition Glassware unless we could properly address the many issues raised by that kind of feature. And just because a weird application is created, doesn’t mean it’ll get distributed in our MyGlass store. We manually approve all the apps that appear there and have several measures in place (from developer policies and screenlocks to warning interstitials) to help protect people’s security on the device."

The Dubai police force will reportedly use its own custom software for facial recognition and discovery in the database, so it’s unclear whether its application actually violates the Glass policy. If it does, though, Google might not be able to do anything about it. If the Dubai police force developed it only for internal use, then the software probably won't go near the MyGlass store. That blog post debunking the myth says that it will not "release or even distribute facial recognition Glassware." But if someone develops their own system and uses it independently, there's not much Google can do to stop it.

I've reached out to Google for clarification on how its facial recognition policy might apply to the reported project in Dubai, and will update this story when I hear back.


link

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Mutex » Tue Oct 07, 2014 3:55 pm UTC

The Dubai police force will reportedly use its own custom software for facial recognition and discovery in the database, so it’s unclear whether its application actually violates the Glass policy. If it does, though, Google might not be able to do anything about it. If the Dubai police force developed it only for internal use, then the software probably won't go near the MyGlass store. That blog post debunking the myth says that it will not "release or even distribute facial recognition Glassware." But if someone develops their own system and uses it independently, there's not much Google can do to stop it.


Uh, exactly? There's nothing a hardware manufacturer can do about someone putting their own software onto the devices they've bought from you. Why the article spent so much time going down that avenue I'm not sure.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Tue Oct 07, 2014 4:07 pm UTC

Well, that's not entirely true. Some manufacturers go to great lengths to try to lock down the hardware. Consoles are a strong example - such as when Sony removed Linux support - or Apple's attempts to prevent jailbreaking. Obviously such efforts typically fail since it only takes one person succeeding anywhere and sharing it to undermine all the security.

I'm not sure what the legalities are around breaking EULAs these days either. I think in Europe the law is generally on the side of the jailbreakers. Not sure the stance in the US though; Have a feeling it might still be on the side of the manufacturers.

Obviously the legalities are irrelevant if it's a government breaking the EULA though, as is the case here. And it's probably not even in the EULA; It's probably just a policy of the app store.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Mutex » Tue Oct 07, 2014 4:30 pm UTC

True, my statement was too broad. And yes it seems to just be an app store policy, so unless the Dubai police were thinking of making their face-recognition software that links to their database and shows you what crimes a given person is wanted for, available for everyone, I don't think that policy is really relevant.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Sun Oct 12, 2014 2:18 pm UTC

First Strike +1/+1 and Indestructible.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Mutex » Sun Oct 12, 2014 4:34 pm UTC



While the pills are not being marketed yet,


That made me imagine a marketing team being given a brief to make an advert for this pill. I guess the trick would be to focus on the life-saving aspect of it.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Sun Oct 12, 2014 7:08 pm UTC

Mutex wrote:


While the pills are not being marketed yet,


That made me imagine a marketing team being given a brief to make an advert for this pill. I guess the trick would be to focus on the life-saving aspect of it.


Patient: This pill smells awful. What is this Shit?
Doctor: Its Shit.
Patient: No seriously, what is this shit?
Doctor: Its literally Bob's shit. Now shut up and eat some shit. We worked hard to get you the right donor.

-----------

As for marketing... here's some ideas.

* Crazy Shit!
* Have some Shit
* Shit Happens
* Piece of Crap
* Eating Crap
* Crappy Pill
First Strike +1/+1 and Indestructible.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Tue Oct 21, 2014 11:33 am UTC

A paralysed man has been able to walk again after a pioneering therapy that involved transplanting cells from his nasal cavity into his spinal cord.

Darek Fidyka, who was paralysed from the chest down in a knife attack in 2010, can now walk using a frame.

The treatment, a world first, was carried out by surgeons in Poland in collaboration with scientists in London. Details of the research are published in the journal Cell Transplantation.


OECs act as pathway cells that enable nerve fibres in the olfactory system to be continually renewed.

In the first of two operations, surgeons removed one of the patient's olfactory bulbs and grew the cells in culture. Two weeks later they transplanted the OECs into the spinal cord, which had been cut through in the knife attack apart from a thin strip of scar tissue on the right. They had just a drop of material to work with - about 500,000 cells.

About 100 micro-injections of OECs were made above and below the injury. Four thin strips of nerve tissue were taken from the patient's ankle and placed across an 8mm (0.3in) gap on the left side of the cord.

The scientists believe the OECs provided a pathway to enable fibres above and below the injury to reconnect, using the nerve grafts to bridge the gap in the cord.

MRI scans suggest that the gap in the cord has closed up following the treatment.


The complex neural circuitry responsible for our sense of smell is the only part of the nervous system that regenerates throughout adult life. It is this ability that scientists have tried to exploit in stimulating repair in the spinal cord.

Every time we breathe, molecules carrying different odours in the air come into contact with nerve cells in the nose. These transmit messages to our olfactory bulbs - at the very top of the nasal cavity, sitting at the base of the brain.

The nerve cells are being continually damaged and must be replaced. This process of regeneration is made possible by olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which provide a pathway for the fibres to grow back.


None of those involved in the research want to profit from it.

Prof Geoff Raisman said: "It would be my proudest boast if I could say that no patient had had to pay one penny for any of the information we have found."

NSIF said if there were any patents arising, it would acquire them so as to make the technique freely available.


Heartwarming in so many ways

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby addams » Tue Oct 21, 2014 12:23 pm UTC

Elasto;
You made me cry.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby karhell » Tue Oct 21, 2014 1:11 pm UTC

I hereby nominate elasto for the understatement of the year.
Heartwarming doesn't even begin to describe this
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby PolakoVoador » Tue Oct 21, 2014 2:27 pm UTC

karhell wrote:I hereby nominate elasto for the understatement of the year.
Heartwarming doesn't even begin to describe this


I second this statement from my fellow penguin.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby sardia » Wed Dec 03, 2014 3:59 pm UTC

http://www.slate.com/articles/technolog ... rking.html
Google continues to demonstrate what perseverance and large sacks of cash can do. The obstacles are insane. You have to keep a continuous network of cell towers mounted on balloons for a hundred days at a time using nothing more than weather data and altitude changes. The winds in the stratosphere move at 100 mph and shift constantly, wreaking havoc at attempts to maintain coverage. Helium leaks are a nightmare to stop, there's a reason NASA can only keep them up for 30 days. Google tripled that. Now the question changed from is it possible to is it profitable.

The project reminds me of the iridium sat phone network but with balloons.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby MartianInvader » Wed Dec 03, 2014 5:48 pm UTC

The "bots: no lying" form of captcha has now become a reality:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2473062,00.asp
Let's have a fervent argument, mostly over semantics, where we all claim the burden of proof is on the other side!

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Trebla » Thu Dec 04, 2014 12:47 pm UTC

MartianInvader wrote:The "bots: no lying" form of captcha has now become a reality:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2473062,00.asp


I must be missing something, while this is obviously an improvement for human usability, how does it deter bots?

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby addams » Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:09 pm UTC

Trebla wrote:
MartianInvader wrote:The "bots: no lying" form of captcha has now become a reality:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2473062,00.asp


I must be missing something, while this is obviously an improvement for human usability, how does it deter bots?

Captcha deters me.
I fail at captcha more often than I succeed.

Did xkcd have captcha?
I wonder how I ever made it in.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Djehutynakht » Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:56 pm UTC

Trebla wrote:
MartianInvader wrote:The "bots: no lying" form of captcha has now become a reality:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2473062,00.asp


I must be missing something, while this is obviously an improvement for human usability, how does it deter bots?


Quickly looking at the BBC:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-30318898

It appears that rather than the actual clicking of the box, the new system records the movements of the cursor before and after the box is clicked, along with some other tools. Apparently it is extremely difficult (for now, anyways) for bots to mimick the actual human arm movement reflected in cursor movement, so recording how your cursor moves is a good way at telling whether or not you're a bot.

Apparently for mobile/non mouse or pad devices (like phones and tablets) the method will picture-based, not check-box based.

Ingenius, actually.

____________


In an "anti-TTRMWLITF" moment...

The fact that the launch of Orion, the craft we hope will take us to Mars, is being stopped by wind.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Felstaff » Thu Dec 04, 2014 3:53 pm UTC

Image

Sadly, due to accessibility requirements, checking pictures of cats would not work for disabled (i.e. partially sighted or blind) people, as it relies on images whereas disabled people might rely on words read aloud. I'm sure Google have already considered this for noCAPTCHA, though, judging by the headphones icon at the bottom. reCAPTCHA currently has a sound equivalence feature enabled to make it accessibility-friendly. I think a workaround would be a sound feature that says something like "which number is the noise a cat makes? One: woof! Two: baa! Three: mrkgnao!" in lieu of the noCAPTCHA imagery above.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Newt » Thu Dec 04, 2014 5:27 pm UTC

I'm not sure how effective an image captcha like that will be for very long; image recognition algorithms already have human or better performance for many tasks, although I think they're mostly supervised.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby mousewiz » Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:05 pm UTC

Djehutynakht wrote:
Trebla wrote:
MartianInvader wrote:The "bots: no lying" form of captcha has now become a reality:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2473062,00.asp


I must be missing something, while this is obviously an improvement for human usability, how does it deter bots?


Quickly looking at the BBC:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-30318898

It appears that rather than the actual clicking of the box, the new system records the movements of the cursor before and after the box is clicked, along with some other tools. Apparently it is extremely difficult (for now, anyways) for bots to mimick the actual human arm movement reflected in cursor movement, so recording how your cursor moves is a good way at telling whether or not you're a bot.

Apparently for mobile/non mouse or pad devices (like phones and tablets) the method will picture-based, not check-box based.

Ingenius, actually.

____________


In an "anti-TTRMWLITF" moment...

The fact that the launch of Orion, the craft we hope will take us to Mars, is being stopped by wind.

Your BBC article link seems broken. But my first google hit was this one: http://homakov.blogspot.ca/2014/12/the- ... oblem.html

That blog post seems to indicate that NoCAPTCHA does not make things harder (bots can still get an OCR CAPTCHA if they want), while introducing another point of attack. The method for attacking NoCAPTCHA shown in the blog sounds similar to other attacks on ReCAPTCHA (eg: trick real web surfers into solving captchas for you), but it might prove easier to trick your users into generating a NoCAPTCHA response for you than it was to get them to generate a ReCAPTCHA response.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby bigglesworth » Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:41 pm UTC

Can't a bot just take some recordings of people clicking on a box and then use those cursor movements?
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby poxic » Thu Dec 04, 2014 7:25 pm UTC

Felstaff wrote:mrkgnao!

Apropos of very little: I just figured out which meow that is. Roughly the "you're bothering me but hello anyway" greeting.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby bentheimmigrant » Thu Dec 04, 2014 8:06 pm UTC

bigglesworth wrote:Can't a bot just take some recordings of people clicking on a box and then use those cursor movements?

Maybe they randomly position the cursor and/or box between screens? They could also move the box when you get close to it...
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Sizik » Thu Dec 11, 2014 6:19 pm UTC

she/they
gmalivuk wrote:
King Author wrote:If space (rather, distance) is an illusion, it'd be possible for one meta-me to experience both body's sensory inputs.
Yes. And if wishes were horses, wishing wells would fill up very quickly with drowned horses.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Tyndmyr » Thu Dec 11, 2014 8:41 pm UTC

bentheimmigrant wrote:
bigglesworth wrote:Can't a bot just take some recordings of people clicking on a box and then use those cursor movements?

Maybe they randomly position the cursor and/or box between screens? They could also move the box when you get close to it...


A box that moves when your cursor gets close to it sounds incredibly annoying.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby bentheimmigrant » Sat Dec 13, 2014 7:03 pm UTC

Tyndmyr wrote:
bentheimmigrant wrote:
bigglesworth wrote:Can't a bot just take some recordings of people clicking on a box and then use those cursor movements?

Maybe they randomly position the cursor and/or box between screens? They could also move the box when you get close to it...


A box that moves when your cursor gets close to it sounds incredibly annoying.

That was the best Rick Roll though.
"Comment is free, but facts are sacred" - C.P. Scott

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby CorruptUser » Sat Dec 13, 2014 7:44 pm UTC



Yeah but when do they get railguns? Oh wait

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Sizik » Fri Dec 19, 2014 10:07 pm UTC

she/they
gmalivuk wrote:
King Author wrote:If space (rather, distance) is an illusion, it'd be possible for one meta-me to experience both body's sensory inputs.
Yes. And if wishes were horses, wishing wells would fill up very quickly with drowned horses.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Wed Jan 07, 2015 1:57 am UTC

Bill Gates funded a project, the Janiki Omniprocessor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVzppWSIFU0

You put in sewer slude, and it outputs water, electricity, and ash. As the youtube video notes, entrepreneurs who finance this system in developing countries will be paid to dispose of sewer sludge. Then, they will be paid for all of its outputs.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby addams » Wed Jan 07, 2015 3:23 am UTC

KnightExemplar wrote:Bill Gates funded a project, the Janiki Omniprocessor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVzppWSIFU0

You put in sewer slude, and it outputs water, electricity, and ash. As the youtube video notes, entrepreneurs who finance this system in developing countries will be paid to dispose of sewer sludge. Then, they will be paid for all of its outputs.

That's hysterical.
In the end when Mr. Gates drinks a sip of that water.

Soo funny.
He knows it it Clean water.
Still...It's got an eeewww factor.

I've seen the same thing with the engineers at the Marsh.
They Know it's clean. They kind of Gack at drinking it.

That water is good for releasing with the ebb tide.
The water from that plant will be good for plants.

It Still has the eeewww factor.
Of course, we would drink it if there were no other Clean water sources.

That would be silly where we live.
Fresh clean water pours forth from the living rock.
I know it sounds like something out of The Bible.

It's True, anyway.
We have so much fresh clean water, we bathe in it.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KittenKaboodle » Wed Jan 07, 2015 6:20 am UTC

Living in the future? I think the sun has been evaporating water from stuff animals left behind for some time now. Though, compared to poo water, dinosaur piss at least sounds funny.

Even incinerating sewage sludge is not all that new. Not to mention that the sludge contains only a small fraction of the water the raw sewage did. I suppose places with a serious shortage of drinking water are fairly dry in general, so this device may well operate at or a bit over breakeven on an energy basis. On the other hand, in places where one can't rely on the sun and generally dry air to dry the sludge, it seems to be common to have to add fuel to the process. In those cases the reason for burning the sludge is to get rid of it at a lower cost than other options, I doubt there is any expectation of even covering costs much less anything like direct profit (except in comparison to alternatives).

I'd imagine that in places where people are dying of thirst (or more likely waterborne disease) , they are no so terribly worried about people dumping sludge in big holes, they are probably happy enough if there is any sewage treatment at all which would help with that waterborne disease part, (treatment which by the way, often involves very large quantities of water) therefore I wouldn't expect the payment for sludge disposal the be so very high. Even in a dry climate it seems unlikely to me that a small scale plant like that could pay for it's operational costs, even if a billionaire donated the up front cost.

But who am I to disagree with the man who gave us Windows(tm)?

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Wed Jan 07, 2015 7:04 am UTC

KittenKaboodle wrote:Even incinerating sewage sludge is not all that new. Not to mention that the sludge contains only a small fraction of the water the raw sewage did. I suppose places with a serious shortage of drinking water are fairly dry in general, so this device may well operate at or a bit over breakeven on an energy basis. On the other hand, in places where one can't rely on the sun and generally dry air to dry the sludge, it seems to be common to have to add fuel to the process. In those cases the reason for burning the sludge is to get rid of it at a lower cost than other options, I doubt there is any expectation of even covering costs much less anything like direct profit (except in comparison to alternatives).

I'd imagine that in places where people are dying of thirst (or more likely waterborne disease) , they are no so terribly worried about people dumping sludge in big holes, they are probably happy enough if there is any sewage treatment at all which would help with that waterborne disease part, (treatment which by the way, often involves very large quantities of water) therefore I wouldn't expect the payment for sludge disposal the be so very high. Even in a dry climate it seems unlikely to me that a small scale plant like that could pay for it's operational costs, even if a billionaire donated the up front cost.

But who am I to disagree with the man who gave us Windows(tm)?


Wired notes that the device costs $1.5 Million, and the first one will be delivered to Senegal by February 2015. I don't know much about water treatment plants, but $1.5 Million sounds rather cheap to me, at least on the city-scale and profit factor that is possible. (Claims it handles the sludge of approximately 100,000 people)

It claims that drier sludge produces more electricity, while wetter sludge produces more water (it needs more heat to evaporate the moisture). In either case, the device benefits regardless of the moisture of its inputs. In fact, the device was originally created as a pure electrical plant running off of dry sludge.

The Janicki Bioenergy Omni Processor - Model S100 started as a proof-of-concept project, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2013. It was originally designed to take in sewer sludge and primarily output electrical power. During the development, it became clear that making clean drinking water made the processor more economically viable, and a water treatment system was added.


They gotta remove the water before they burn the sludge anyway. Might as well siphon off the water, clean it, and drink it. In any case, it doesn't seem like additives are needed. There is just a maximum moisture content of 84%, so it needs to be somewhat dried off before entering the machine. The second machine gets away with 91% moisture content with additives (as you claim). But nonetheless, it seems to make a profit from the electricity alone.

But who am I to disagree with the man who gave us Windows(tm)?


Bill Gates has been working on 3rd-World Country technology since he left Microsoft in ~2000. After that point, Ballmer ran Microsoft, and only recently did Bill Gates return to Microsoft.

Bill Gates has developed power-less refrigerators to carry vaccines to Haiti, Zimbabwe, Niger and other countries. To deliver the drug, he funded development of needleless vaccines, because people in the 3rd world are distrustful of needles (And also to solve the refrigeration issue). His "technology" involves stuff as simple and cheap as nets... and as advanced as the water-filtration electric generator plant that you see in the previous post.

Bill Gate's technology and donations have literally wiped out Polio in all of India.

So... I'd think the man knows a thing or two about technology that might be able to help the 3rd world. He's definitely not a bioengineer, chemist or doctor. But his business mind combined with literally billions of dollars allow him to fund and direct research in ways no other man can do today. Bill Gate's current philanthropic record is $28 Billion donated and counting. This btw isn't Bill Gate's first shitty accomplishment. The last one funded the RTI Toilet, which similarly turned feces into energy.

If anything, his investments prove that Bill Gate's supreme talent... above all else... is recognizing a good idea. And then funding it, and then making money off of it.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby jestingrabbit » Wed Jan 07, 2015 10:07 am UTC

That Janicki omniprocessor could be used on pig farms to reclaim the waste in their ponds.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby DaBigCheez » Wed Jan 07, 2015 8:02 pm UTC

I feel like I read about something similar in Discover magazine about a decade ago. It was purporting to separate arbitrary organic components into water + various fuels for transport (as opposed to primarily burning them on-site and producing electricity), with the pilot program being to process waste from a Butterball turkey plant. I believe it was referred to as the Thermal Depolymerization Process; I think it wound up being non-economical, though, giving poorer outputs/more difficulty in tuning the process properly to the inputs than expected? Not sure.

It was one of those things where I was thinking "man, if this works, why hasn't it taken off big-time already", so it'll be interesting to see if this amounts to the "practical" form of the same general idea - get rid of waste and create useful outputs, making profit (or at least paying for operating costs) on both ends.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby addams » Thu Jan 08, 2015 1:27 am UTC

KittenKaboodle;
You make some good points.
My favorites follow.

1. In those cases the reason for burning the sludge is to get rid of it at a lower cost than other options.

2. I'd imagine that in places where people are dying of thirst (or more likely waterborne disease) , they are no so terribly worried about people dumping sludge in big holes, they are probably happy enough if there is any sewage treatment at all which would help with that waterborne disease part, (treatment which by the way, often involves very large quantities of water).


Yes.
We are not living in The Future.
We are living in the Now.

This must be The Best we have, Now.

Water borne diseases are horrible.
Humans need water. Catch 44.

This machine looks like something out of Dr. Suess.
It may require input of energy; Propane or Solar.

How many lives will go uneventfully by?
That is The Goal. Is it not?

The Goal is to have this thing huffing and puffing in the distance
while people walk by and talk about it.

One of those machines can handle the waste for; How many people per day?
Waste Disposal is an entire Specialty in its own right.

How many lives must be impacted for it to be worth 1.5 million dollars?
The man with the money seems to think it is worth the risk.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KittenKaboodle » Thu Jan 08, 2015 6:59 am UTC

Hey, I didn't mean to start a shit storm (pun totally intended)
I just wanted to say Dinosaur piss, which was a comment on Addams' "eeewww factor". Water that was cooked out of sewage a few minutes ago has the eew factor, but that is not the first time those oxygen and hydrogen atoms have been somewhere one might not want to think too hard about. Oh, I know what you are going to say, but are you sure?

One of those machines can handle the waste for; How many people per day?
Waste Disposal is an entire Specialty in its own right.

How many lives must be impacted for it to be worth 1.5 million dollars?
The man with the money seems to think it is worth the risk.


Note that the Janiki Omniprocessor goes after the sewage treatment plant, I think one needs a fair bit more than $1.5 million for the entire setup, still for 100,000 people...
Here in US America spending Billions (that is a 'B') on a highway to carry 100,000 people's cars is seen as reasonable, so, hell, even tack another zero or two on that 1.5millon and it is still a bargain even if it saves only as many lives as the previously mentioned cars kill. But still, I think the far lager impact will be from the proceeding sewage treatment, not the final sludge disposal.

Oh, wait, never mind... I just took a look at the "Gates notes" post about it. Despite Mr. Janiki specifically saying "sewer sludge" in the video, It seems this thing is not for western style post treatment sludge, they are planning to burn raw (dried) sewage:
Today, in many places without modern sewage systems, truckers take the waste from latrines and dump it into the nearest river or the ocean—or at a treatment facility that doesn’t actually treat the sewage. Either way, it often ends up in the water supply. If they took it to the Omniprocessor instead, it would be burned safely.

Compared to that, even if, (as I'm inclined to suspect) the net energy output claim is a pile of shit, it is still well worth what is costs (which I bet is going to be a lot more than $1.5 million)

Press release price; $15 per capita, real cost; maybe $150 per capita?* not watching your children die; Priceless!

Also interesting, a search for "sewage sludge ash" shows some mention of recovering phosphorus for fertilizer, a major product of Senegal is phosphates! so they might already have a market. I still suspect this is something that would need continuous subsidy from rich westerners, but perhaps not as much pie in the sky as it appears at first glance.

*Sounds cheap here in US America, but in Senegal it's about a fifth of the GDP per capita, still, compared to watching your children die...

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Thu Jan 08, 2015 7:32 am UTC

KittenKaboodle wrote:Hey, I didn't mean to start a shit storm (pun totally intended)


Lest this thread goes to crap.

Okay, I'll stop now.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Thu Jan 08, 2015 11:44 am UTC

We're not quite living in the future yet - but we might be soon: A start-up has demo'd charging a mobile-phone-sized battery from empty to full in a couple of minutes.

But that might not be the most game-changing aspect: They are now turning their sights to electric vehicles - and plan to showcase a car battery that can charge from empty to full in a couple of minutes also.

Being able to 'refuel' an electric car as easily as a gas one, well, that could change the world.

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