The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

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elasto
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:17 am UTC

And AlphaGo has won the third game too - meaning it has an unassailable 3-0 lead in the best-of-five competition.

With this and Watson's crushing of Jeopardy, AI really is coming of age.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Mutex » Sat Mar 12, 2016 11:29 am UTC

KnightExemplar wrote:
PolakoVoador wrote:From what I've read, it was the O10 move that made everyone double or triple-check. And the guy who was commentating is really really high level (9P). And he was kind of hesitant to place the O10 stone on their analysis board when it happened.


https://youtu.be/l-GsfyVCBu0?t=1h18m13s

Yup, there it is. That's a big jump, and it happened before I started watching. Interesting...


This is why when films or sci-fi authors depict AI as being human like and thinking like humans I kinda think they're missing the point. The amazing thing about AI is that it *doesn't* think like humans or approach problems the same way we do. It finds better ways to do things. Example, AI designed circuitry/hardware, where the result works extremely well, but no human has been able to actually understand how it works.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby morriswalters » Sat Mar 12, 2016 1:18 pm UTC

Mutex wrote:The amazing thing about AI is that it *doesn't* think like humans or approach problems the same way we do.
Different classes of problem solving. GO programs are specialists, much like the parts of the brain dealing with vision, speech, and hearing. Which we can't reproduce yet either. However amazing none the less.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Sat Mar 12, 2016 4:58 pm UTC

elasto wrote:With this and Watson's crushing of Jeopardy, AI really is coming of age.


Talk to any Quiz-show expert worth their salt (who has actually been on Jeopardy), and you'll know that the game is pretty awful actually. Good Quiz-shows allow the users to interrupt the host while the question is being read, because the vast majority of good quiz-show questions can be answered after hearing just the first 4 words.

When you train for Quiz-shows, you memorize things like "There was only one important event in 18XX: the Chicago something or another". You then train to answer questions as completely and redundantly as possible within the format. (Ex: In 1962, the novel (bzzzz interrupt) -- Answer: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. You don't know yet if the question was going to ask for the author or the novel's name yet, so you just give everything).

Jeopardy however locks you out until the host is done talking. Its primarily a reaction game. Everyone there knows the answer to virtually every question, its simply who can buzz in after the lock has been released. And computers are mind-boggling good at that sort of timing. The fact that Watson was hard-wired into the "lock" so it knew exactly when the lock was released and pushed the button with computer-precision is somewhat unfair, especially on the easy questions.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Chen » Sat Mar 12, 2016 6:06 pm UTC

KnightExemplar wrote:Jeopardy however locks you out until the host is done talking. Its primarily a reaction game. Everyone there knows the answer to virtually every question, its simply who can buzz in after the lock has been released. And computers are mind-boggling good at that sort of timing. The fact that Watson was hard-wired into the "lock" so it knew exactly when the lock was released and pushed the button with computer-precision is somewhat unfair, especially on the easy questions.


This is the same reason Ken Jennings did so well. After the first 10 or so episodes he had the buzzer timing down MUCH better than any new contestants.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby dg61 » Sun Mar 13, 2016 3:28 am UTC

Chen wrote:
KnightExemplar wrote:Jeopardy however locks you out until the host is done talking. Its primarily a reaction game. Everyone there knows the answer to virtually every question, its simply who can buzz in after the lock has been released. And computers are mind-boggling good at that sort of timing. The fact that Watson was hard-wired into the "lock" so it knew exactly when the lock was released and pushed the button with computer-precision is somewhat unfair, especially on the easy questions.


This is the same reason Ken Jennings did so well. After the first 10 or so episodes he had the buzzer timing down MUCH better than any new contestants.


Collegiate quizbowl in general would be interesting-it relies more on natural language processing, contextualizing information("what events happened in (country whose language this word sounds like it's in"), and so on. What I suspect is that it would have a easier time with more binary questions and a harder time with e.g. question on things with fuzzy answer lines or that require you to recognize something from a description.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Sun Mar 13, 2016 4:18 am UTC

KnightExemplar wrote:
elasto wrote:With this and Watson's crushing of Jeopardy, AI really is coming of age.


Talk to any Quiz-show expert worth their salt (who has actually been on Jeopardy), and you'll know that the game is pretty awful actually. Good Quiz-shows allow the users to interrupt the host while the question is being read, because the vast majority of good quiz-show questions can be answered after hearing just the first 4 words.

When you train for Quiz-shows, you memorize things like "There was only one important event in 18XX: the Chicago something or another". You then train to answer questions as completely and redundantly as possible within the format. (Ex: In 1962, the novel (bzzzz interrupt) -- Answer: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. You don't know yet if the question was going to ask for the author or the novel's name yet, so you just give everything).

Jeopardy however locks you out until the host is done talking. Its primarily a reaction game. Everyone there knows the answer to virtually every question, its simply who can buzz in after the lock has been released. And computers are mind-boggling good at that sort of timing. The fact that Watson was hard-wired into the "lock" so it knew exactly when the lock was released and pushed the button with computer-precision is somewhat unfair, especially on the easy questions.

Wow. So it really is true that any time AI does anything amazing, someone will downplay the achievement.

We're talking about algorithms and hardware that can not only do things previously thought the realm exclusively of high intelligence (eg. natural language processing; abstract reasoning; general knowledge recall), but doing it better than the best humans. Not just better than the average human but the best ones.

Sure, will AI go on to do even more amazing things in the future? Of course. As I said, AI has 'come of age' - ie. turned 18yo in human terms - not that it is the finished article. Watson is now going on to do medical diagnoses better than the best specialists - which is sort of the human equivalent of leaving university and getting a proper job instead of spending its time playing games. But if the version of you from a couple of decades ago wouldn't have had their mind boggled at what algorithms can do these days, you lacked imagination back then or have become jaded now or something...

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Sun Mar 13, 2016 5:07 am UTC

Watson is interesting / amazing. But as a former-quiz bowl B-team member, I hate Jeopardy. Ask any quiz-show expert worth a damn, and they'll let you know how bullshit the Jeopardy format is.

Its not a slight against Watson, its a slight against Jeopardy. Get it right. Its a shame that Jeopardy is the most famous Quiz-bowl show. It would have been FAR more interesting to see Watson compete in a more serious game that had a better demonstration of Quiz-bowl skill. But Jeopardy... its a bad game. Period. Just... popular. So its a good target for general populace prestige I guess.

But within the quiz-bowl culture, I guarantee you that people look down on Jeopardy.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Mambrino » Sun Mar 13, 2016 9:54 am UTC

So, while the whole series will go to AlphaGo (having won 3 of 5), Lee Sedol has now managed a win. The decisive move gets praise.

We also now know what the AlphaGo resign screen looks like.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby morriswalters » Sun Mar 13, 2016 11:38 am UTC

elasto wrote:Wow. So it really is true that any time AI does anything amazing, someone will downplay the achievement.
The average human Radiologist will see hundreds of thousand images in his working life time. Watson will comb through millions if not billions to do the required deep learning to enable it to make a diagnosis on any given image. That is amazing.

It is a function of doing exactly one thing well, drawing meaning from one type of image. The idea that it does it better than any human is a fallacy. It does something different than a human. Nobody looks at a high speed bottling machine in a factory and gushes, golly it can bottle better than humans, yet it can and does. Watson will do what it does better than humans when it can drive home, wash the dishes, take out the trash and whistle the Battle Hymn of The Republic , all while reading x-rays and burning about 20 or so Watts. Or decide at fifty to leave Medicine and take up goat farming in the Falklands.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Mutex » Sun Mar 13, 2016 11:55 am UTC

Mambrino wrote:We also now know what the AlphaGo resign screen looks like.


So it uses Ubuntu. The game progress screen does anyway. Probably Google's Goobuntu distro.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby commodorejohn » Sun Mar 13, 2016 2:44 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:It is a function of doing exactly one thing well, drawing meaning from one type of image. The idea that it does it better than any human is a fallacy. It does something different than a human. Nobody looks at a high speed bottling machine in a factory and gushes, golly it can bottle better than humans, yet it can and does. Watson will do what it does better than humans when it can drive home, wash the dishes, take out the trash and whistle the Battle Hymn of The Republic , all while reading x-rays and burning about 20 or so Watts. Or decide at fifty to leave Medicine and take up goat farming in the Falklands.

But morris, it's so Futurey!
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Tyndmyr » Mon Mar 14, 2016 2:11 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:
elasto wrote:Wow. So it really is true that any time AI does anything amazing, someone will downplay the achievement.
The average human Radiologist will see hundreds of thousand images in his working life time. Watson will comb through millions if not billions to do the required deep learning to enable it to make a diagnosis on any given image. That is amazing.

It is a function of doing exactly one thing well, drawing meaning from one type of image. The idea that it does it better than any human is a fallacy. It does something different than a human. Nobody looks at a high speed bottling machine in a factory and gushes, golly it can bottle better than humans, yet it can and does. Watson will do what it does better than humans when it can drive home, wash the dishes, take out the trash and whistle the Battle Hymn of The Republic , all while reading x-rays and burning about 20 or so Watts. Or decide at fifty to leave Medicine and take up goat farming in the Falklands.


The thing that makes humans so amazing and human is always listed as the thing or things the robots can't do yet.

I suspect that progress will keep chipping away at that pool of things, and people will keep pointing to the ever smaller list of stuff saying "but THAT's what's important" because they need to feel special.

Robots seem unafflicted by this.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby jseah » Mon Mar 14, 2016 2:15 pm UTC

Tyndmyr wrote:I suspect that progress will keep chipping away at that pool of things, and people will keep pointing to the ever smaller list of stuff saying "but THAT's what's important" because they need to feel special.

Robots seem unafflicted by this.

Deep Learning is cool though. One more step to humanizing the robot.

We still need to find the way humans can learn from extremely small datasets. Like mentioned above, the remarkable thing about the human radiologist is that the lifetime exposure to the images is just about barely enough to create a training dataset for an NN.

There is still much potential in AI.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby commodorejohn » Mon Mar 14, 2016 3:55 pm UTC

Tyndmyr wrote:Robots seem unafflicted by this.

That's because robots don't have to worry about everybody wanting to replace them with humans.

For serious, though, if we ever do get to the point where there's nothing separating artificial intelligences from humans except implementation details, in one sense that will be kind of neat, but in another sense it'll open up a whole variety of messy questions because we'll basically just have created another kind of people, and we have a hard enough time managing with one kind. (And no, I don't buy that humans are ever going to engineer a species less fucked-up than themselves. Maybe in different ways, but not less.) Whatever happens or can happen with AI down the road, I strongly suspect that we'll stop short of that because pretty much nobody really wants that except out of academic curiosity.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby ucim » Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:21 pm UTC

commodorejohn wrote:Whatever happens or can happen with AI down the road, I strongly suspect that we'll stop short of that because pretty much nobody really wants that except out of academic curiosity.
I strongly suspect the opposite, because we won't recognize that threshold before we're long past it, and because some people really do want that, and believe that robots are better than people, and should replace them.

Robots will be doing "what they want" long before we realize that's what they're doing.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby sardia » Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:22 pm UTC

Counter point. Australia. Founded as a penal colony, but they turned out alright.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Tyndmyr » Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:27 pm UTC

commodorejohn wrote:
Tyndmyr wrote:Robots seem unafflicted by this.

That's because robots don't have to worry about everybody wanting to replace them with humans.

For serious, though, if we ever do get to the point where there's nothing separating artificial intelligences from humans except implementation details, in one sense that will be kind of neat, but in another sense it'll open up a whole variety of messy questions because we'll basically just have created another kind of people, and we have a hard enough time managing with one kind. (And no, I don't buy that humans are ever going to engineer a species less fucked-up than themselves. Maybe in different ways, but not less.) Whatever happens or can happen with AI down the road, I strongly suspect that we'll stop short of that because pretty much nobody really wants that except out of academic curiosity.


I mean, *I* want that. I just lack the ability to do that. Yet.

Who cares? People make other humans all the time, and they often barely bother with proper testing and quality control at ALL for that. Engineering one from the ground up seems like the sort of thing that's perfectly rational to try.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby commodorejohn » Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:34 pm UTC

I'm not saying it won't happen (ucim makes a good counter-point to my theory,) or that we shouldn't. I just don't think we're going to have any easier a time dealing with electronic people than we do with meat people. As for "we don't want that," I guess I should clarify: I don't think society in general is keen on the idea outside of a fictional context, and I don't think that that's at all what the people in a position to fund serious AI development (organizations that want to use it for application purposes) want out of AI research.

(Note to self: start a band named "Meat People.")
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby morriswalters » Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:42 pm UTC

Tyndmyr wrote:The thing that makes humans so amazing and human is always listed as the thing or things the robots can't do yet.
The thing that makes humans amazing is that they self assembled along with the rest of the biosphere. Lets see how long it takes for silicon to self assemble into a quad core processor.

There isn't any reason to believe that the human mind and everything it does, can't be duplicated by machines. We, after all, are simply a biological machine. And I think that Deep Mind represents a pretty amazing leap forward for technology. But at its current state it is much like a bottling machine, it does one thing very well. Once it has become impossible for a human to beat it, it has reached its shiny zenith, it has shot its wad. Next trick please.
Tyndmyr wrote:I suspect that progress will keep chipping away at that pool of things, and people will keep pointing to the ever smaller list of stuff saying "but THAT's what's important" because they need to feel special.
They are special. They are the point. Unless your goal is evolutionary and designed to eventually to replace humans altogether. I love technology, but if it doesn't do something I need it to do then what is the point?
Tyndmyr wrote:Robots seem unafflicted by this.
Robots don't think or feel emotion in any sense that I'm aware of to this point. How could they be "afflicted" at all?
jseah wrote:We still need to find the way humans can learn from extremely small datasets. Like mentioned above, the remarkable thing about the human radiologist is that the lifetime exposure to the images is just about barely enough to create a training dataset for an NN.
Precisely.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Tyndmyr » Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:54 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:
Tyndmyr wrote:Robots seem unafflicted by this.
Robots don't think or feel emotion in any sense that I'm aware of to this point. How could they be "afflicted" at all?


Humans don't really think or feel emotion, either. They just simulate it.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Whizbang » Mon Mar 14, 2016 6:44 pm UTC

Incredulity loading...

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Tue Mar 15, 2016 6:35 pm UTC

http://www.theverge.com/2016/3/15/11234 ... game-recap

Verge's recap of the Alphago vs Lee Sedol matches. If you've been following this past week, you already know everything in that article. Otherwise, its a great piece for those who want to catch up or figure out what the big deal was anyway.

History was made. 4-1 Alphago vs Lee Sedol. The last of the great games has finally been mastered by an AI. I don't think there's another longstanding game to go from here. Checkers, Chess, Othello, Backgammon, Poker, Shogi, Go... they have all been conquered by AI experts. Go was the last bastion, the last holdout of the great turn-based games. In some ways, the conquering of Go was inevitable... based on how advanced computers have marched through the other games. But to see the last great game fall to the machines is still a humbling experience.

A hundred years ago: people would dress up as a computer to "cheat" at computer chess. As a trick to spur the imagination. Today, computers play at super-human levels of precision and understanding of these games.

From the perspective of Go players: the rise of a strong Go AI reveals the many mysteries of the Go openings / joseki. We all knew that the joseki are more tradition as opposed to fully fleshed out concepts. (Unlike Chess, Go opening theory is far more mystical. No one can truly claim an understanding of the Go early game). With the rise of a powerful AI, it invites the ability for computer-assisted learning of the Go opening. Who knows? Maybe the Tengen (Center of heaven: the 10x10 point) will prove to be a good opening once the AIs have analyzed the position! :-)
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Dauric » Tue Mar 15, 2016 6:41 pm UTC

KnightExemplar wrote:History was made. 4-1 Alphago vs Lee Sedol. The last of the great games has finally been mastered by an AI. I don't think there's another longstanding game to go from here. Checkers, Chess, Othello, Backgammon, Poker, Shogi, Go... they have all been conquered by AI experts. Go was the last bastion, the last holdout of the great turn-based games. In some ways, the conquering of Go was inevitable... based on how advanced computers have marched through the other games. But to see the last great game fall to the machines is still a humbling experience.


Clearly this calls for research in to more advanced games that will baffle AI and keep Humanity ahead in the race to not be rendered redundant at playing games....
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby sardia » Tue Mar 15, 2016 8:14 pm UTC

How about Eclipse the board game or other well regarded advanced board games.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby morriswalters » Tue Mar 15, 2016 8:24 pm UTC

Dauric wrote:
KnightExemplar wrote:History was made. 4-1 Alphago vs Lee Sedol. The last of the great games has finally been mastered by an AI. I don't think there's another longstanding game to go from here. Checkers, Chess, Othello, Backgammon, Poker, Shogi, Go... they have all been conquered by AI experts. Go was the last bastion, the last holdout of the great turn-based games. In some ways, the conquering of Go was inevitable... based on how advanced computers have marched through the other games. But to see the last great game fall to the machines is still a humbling experience.


Clearly this calls for research in to more advanced games that will baffle AI and keep Humanity ahead in the race to not be rendered redundant at playing games....
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“But our internal tests say something different.” Even if Mr Lee does manage to pull off an improbable victory, though, humans are unlikely to stay on top for long. As AlphaGo’s algorithms are twerked, and as it gathers more data from which to learn, it is only going to get better. Asked whether there was a ceiling to its abilities, Dr Hassabis said he did not know: “If there is, we haven’t found it yet.”
Not only has he not found it, he won't be able to measure it since the metric involved beating people. He says card games are next. Bridge Deep Mind?

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KittenKaboodle » Tue Mar 15, 2016 8:33 pm UTC

Dauric wrote:Clearly this calls for research in to more advanced games that will baffle AI and keep Humanity ahead in the race to not be rendered redundant at playing games....


The Simpsons Randal did it!
https://xkcd.com/1002/

And of course there is Global thermonuclear war, due to computers need for electricity and susceptibility to EMP I imagine humans could manage victory of sorts albeit a Pyrrhic one.

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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Tue Mar 15, 2016 8:47 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:
“As AlphaGo’s algorithms are twerked


WTF? Twerk is the wrong word here.

EDIT: Oh shit, its a Mod Madness filter. Lol.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby commodorejohn » Tue Mar 15, 2016 9:20 pm UTC

KnightExemplar wrote:A hundred years ago: people would dress up as a computer to "cheat" at computer chess.

If you think today's cosplayers are freakishly dedicated, just wait until you see the old silver-nitrate photographs of a man dressed as the 1916 Burroughs Electro-Tabulator!
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby freezeblade » Tue Mar 15, 2016 9:24 pm UTC

KnightExemplar wrote:
morriswalters wrote:
“As AlphaGo’s algorithms are twerked


WTF? Twerk is the wrong word here.

EDIT: Oh shit, its a Mod Madness filter. Lol.


That filter has been around since the last madness though. Other remaining ones (last I checked) are the nickname for the ADA filtering to "the affordable care act" and the name of a certain R...Paul as "The Ronpaul"
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby ahammel » Wed Mar 16, 2016 12:49 am UTC

freezeblade wrote:
KnightExemplar wrote:
morriswalters wrote:
“As AlphaGo’s algorithms are twerked


WTF? Twerk is the wrong word here.

EDIT: Oh shit, its a Mod Madness filter. Lol.


That filter has been around since the last madness though. Other remaining ones (last I checked) are the nickname for the ADA filtering to "the affordable care act" and the name of a certain R...Paul as "The Ronpaul"
I think that last one is old as well.
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Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Chen » Wed Mar 16, 2016 2:42 am UTC

sardia wrote:How about Eclipse the board game or other well regarded advanced board games.


The AI on my ipad version of Eclipse actually isn't half bad. That said there's a decent amount of randomness in Eclipse so even if you somehow played objectively better than someone else, you could still lose.

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Re: The wool To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby KnightExemplar » Sat Mar 19, 2016 9:05 pm UTC

“Above all, Korean society is ironically lucky, that thanks to the ‘AlphaGo shock’, we have learned the importance of AI before it is too late.”


http://www.nature.com/news/south-korea- ... ck-1.19595

South Korea is launching a $860+ Million (in USD) fund for developing AI. They claim its because of AlphaGo.
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Re: The wool To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby commodorejohn » Sat Mar 19, 2016 10:37 pm UTC

"We cannot allow a boardgame gap!"
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Re: The wool To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby jewish_scientist » Tue Mar 22, 2016 12:30 pm UTC

When you really think about it, no computer has beaten a top human at any of the big games yet. A human is always the one who puts the pieces down, so the AI is really just giving advice to that human.
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Re: The wool To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Whizbang » Tue Mar 22, 2016 12:48 pm UTC

So, if a human is playing a game on a computer, does that mean the computer always wins, since it is the computer who draws the pieces?

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Re: The wool To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Zohar » Tue Mar 22, 2016 12:50 pm UTC

Truly none of these are actual achievements until we have a robot that plays chess.
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Re: The wool To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Trebla » Tue Mar 22, 2016 1:38 pm UTC

Whizbang wrote:So, if a human is playing a game on a computer, does that mean the computer always wins, since it is the computer who draws the pieces?


Poor humanity, turns out we never beat (or even played?) the A.I. at StarCraft or Counter Strike after all... we were just giving it advice and it was making the moves.

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Re: The wool To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby addams » Tue Mar 22, 2016 9:44 pm UTC

KnightExemplar wrote:
“Above all, Korean society is ironically lucky, that thanks to the ‘AlphaGo shock’, we have learned the importance of AI before it is too late.”


http://www.nature.com/news/south-korea- ... ck-1.19595

South Korea is launching a $860+ hundred (in USD) fund for developing AI. They claim its because of AlphaGo.

Look! Look!
Government can move Fast! That is noteworthy. (How? Why?)
The AlphaGo Shock hit and the government responded in a matter of Days!

But it does include the founding of a high-profile, public–private research centre with participation from several Korean conglomerates, including Samsung, LG Electronics and Hyundai Motor, as well as the technology firm Naver, based near Seoul.

South = Capitalist?
“I’m very sorry to hear that the government is interested in investing a lot of money in mostly industry, not universities,” said one machine-learning professor at a leading Korean university, who requested anonymity in order to talk openly about the policy. “Industry will probably get some useful applications for making some product, but they are basically not interested in the research itself.”


That must be a miss-translation or something.
Still,...The masses, the common people, by the millions;
All of a sudden 'care' and care 'deeply'.

The Western Masses are moved in similar ways by FootBall.
All little Korean girls and boys are going to dream of ....

Doing What? with AI's.

I'm not good at news.
My history is too shaky.
she emphasized that “artificial intelligence can be a blessing for human society” and called it [b]“the fourth industrial revolution”. She added, “Above all, Korean society is ironically lucky, that thanks to the ‘AlphaGo shock’, we have learned the importance of AI before it is too late.”[/b]


What were the other III revolutions?
Too Late?? Too late for what??

To Go head-to-head with China's AlphaGo VS Korea's AlphaGo.
It's like a low body count movie. I don't know Go.
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Re: The wool To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby bentheimmigrant » Tue Mar 22, 2016 10:28 pm UTC

On a more sombre note, Facebook today informed me that my friend in Brussels was safe. I find the Safety Check feature amazing, despite the less amazing cause.
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