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Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 10:58 am UTC
by scikidus
http://s.nyt.com/u/yMA

Ivan Sekretarev/Associated Press
Police officers in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, were attacked by protesters on Wednesday. Witnesses said the police seemed to panic.
By CLIFFORD J. LEVY
Published: April 8, 2010
MOSCOW — After a day of bloody protests against the repressive rule of the president of Kyrgyzstan, which forced him to flee the capital of Bishkek, an opposition leader said on Thursday that a transitional government had taken over, dissolved parliament and would remain in power for six months.
The unrest which erupted on Wednesday seemed to pose a potential threat to a critical American air base supporting the NATO campaign in nearby Afghanistan. But Roza Otunbayeva, a former foreign minister who has emerged as head of a coalition of opposition groups, said on Thursday the supply line would not be immediately affected.
“Its status quo will remain in place,” she said at a news conference in the Parliament building. But she warned: “We still have some questions on it. Give us time and we will listen to all the sides and solve everything.”
Opposition politicians, speaking on state television after it was seized by protesters Wednesday, said they had taken control of the government after a day of violent clashes that left 68 people dead, officials said, and more than 400 wounded.
Ms. Otunbayeva said an interim government would rule for six months.
“You can call this revolution. You can call this a people’s revolt. Either way, it is our way of saying that we want justice and democracy,” she said.
The unrest threatened to have regional consequences and neighboring Uzbekistan closed its border with Kyrgyzstan, Reuters reported.
On Wednesday, riot police officers fired into angry crowds of demonstrators who gathered around government buildings to rally against what they termed the government’s brutality and corruption, as well as a recent decision to increase utility rates sharply. Witnesses said that the police seemed to panic, and that there was no sign of supervision. In several cases, demonstrators wrested their weapons away from them.
By early Thursday morning, opposition officials occupied many government buildings in Bishkek, and were demanding that the president, Kurmanbek Bakiyev, sign a formal letter of resignation. Mr. Bakiyev has issued no public remarks since the protests began. An official at the Bishkek airport said Mr. Bakiyev was flying to Osh, a major city in the southern part of the country.
Ms. Otunbayeva was quoted in news reports as saying Mr. Bakiyev had fled to the south of the country and was seeking to marshal support among his followers there.
There was no immediate public response from Mr. Bakiyev to an apparent offer by Ms. Otunbayeva to negotiate his formal departure from power.
A coalition of opposition parties said Wednesday that Ms. Otunbayeva would head the transition government.. “Power is now in the hands of the people’s government,” she said in a televised address on Wednesday evening.
Those same opposition leaders were angered last spring when Obama administration officials courted Mr. Bakiyev — who they admitted was an autocrat — in an ultimately successful attempt to retain rights to the military base, Manas, used to supply troops in Afghanistan. President Obama even sent him a letter of praise.
Russia had offered Mr. Bakiyev a sizable amount in new aid, which the United States interpreted as an effort to persuade him to close the base in order to limit the American military presence in Russia’s sphere of influence. After vowing to evict the Americans last year, Mr. Bakiyev reversed course once the administration agreed to pay much higher rent for the base.
An American official said late on Wednesday that flights into the base at Manas had been suspended. Lt. Cmdr. Bill Speaks, a spokesman for United States Central Command, said late on Wednesday that some troops and equipment scheduled to transit from Manas to Afghanistan were likely to be delayed because of the government upheaval and that the military was preparing to use other routes.
The American attitude toward Mr. Bakiyev ruffled opposition politicians in Kyrgyzstan, who said it was shameful for the United States to stand for democratic values in the developing world while maintaining an alliance with him.
The Kyrgyz president’s son, Maksim, had been scheduled to be in Washington on Thursday for talks with administration officials. The opposition views the younger Mr. Bakiyev as a vicious henchman for his father, and was infuriated that he was granted an audience. The State Department said late on Wednesday that it had canceled the meetings.
Opposition leaders have been divided in recent weeks over whether they would continue to allow the American military base to remain, but it seems clear that they harbor bitterness toward the United States. And neighboring Russia, which has long resented the base, has been currying favor with the opposition.
“The political behavior of the United States has created a situation where the new authorities may want to look more to Russia than to the United States, and it will strengthen their political will to rebuff the United States,” said Bakyt Beshimov, an opposition leader who fled Kyrgyzstan last August in fear for his life.
Mr. Beshimov was one of numerous opposition politicians and journalists who in recent years have been threatened, beaten and even killed. Kyrgyzstan, with five million people in the mountains of Central Asia, is one of the poorest countries of the former Soviet Union, and has long been troubled by political conflict and corruption. Mr. Bakiyev himself took power in 2005 after the Tulip Revolution, one of a series of so-called color revolutions that seemed to offer hope of more democracy in former Soviet republics. Since then, the Kyrgyz human rights situation has deteriorated. Mr. Bakiyev easily won another term as president last year, but independent monitors said the election was tainted by extensive fraud.
Tensions in Kyrgyzstan have been brewing for months, and seemed to be touched off in the provincial city of Talas on Tuesday by protests over soaring utility rates. Then on Wednesday, thousands of people began massing in Bishkek, where they were met by heavily armed riot police officers. Dmitri Kabak, director of a local human rights group in Bishkek, said in a telephone interview that he was monitoring the protest when riot police officers started shooting. “When people started marching toward the presidential office, snipers on the roof of the office started to open fire, with live bullets,” Mr. Kabak said. “I saw several people who were killed right there on the square.”
Dinara Saginbayeva, a Kyrgyz health official, said in a telephone interview that the death toll could rise, and that more than 350 people had been wounded in Bishkek alone. Opposition leaders said as many as 100 people may have died.
While the fighting was raging, security forces still loyal to the president arrested several prominent opposition leaders, including Omurbek Tekebayev, a former speaker of Parliament, and Almazbek Atambayev, a former prime minister and presidential candidate. They were later released after the government’s resistance appeared to wither.
While opposition leaders have promised to pursue a less authoritarian course, Central Asia has not proved fertile ground for democracy. Mr. Bakiyev himself took office declaring that he would respect political freedoms.
Whatever happens domestically, a new government will have decide how to balance the interests of the United States and Russia, which both have military bases in Kyrgyzstan and want to maintain a presence in the region. Paul Quinn-Judge, Central Asia project director for International Crisis Group, a research organization, said Russia had stoked anti-American sentiment in Kyrgyzstan in recent months, often over the issue of the base.
Nevertheless, Mr. Quinn-Judge said he suspected that opposition politicians would in the end decide to permit the base, though not before giving the United States a hard time. “My gut feeling is that it can be smoothed over,” he said. “But they have got to move fast to reach out to the opposition, and do it with a certain degree of humility.”
Nikolai Khalip contributed reporting from Moscow, Alan Cowell from Paris, and Elisabeth Bumiller from Washington.


Now we get to wait for international response. If they can actually get out of there in six months, that will be amazing.

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 1:09 pm UTC
by Felstaff
Fixed your Topic Title for you.

I heard this on the radio this morning. Three thoughts, initially - i.) what affect would it have on US military operations in Afghanistan, ii.) it felt a little ominous when the opposition 'invited' the exiled premier to 'show himself' so that they could 'talk'. Seeing as it was far from a bloodless coup, I doubt this will happen, and there appears to be foreshadowing of an uprising from the south, where the president's support is stronger. And iii.) what kind of scrabble score could you get with Kyrgyzstan?

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 1:36 pm UTC
by jestingrabbit
30.

In terms of how easy it will be for NATO to resupply in Afghanistan after this, this article sheds some light

http://in.reuters.com/article/southAsia ... 0920100408

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 1:42 pm UTC
by SlyReaper
Felstaff wrote:And iii.) what kind of scrabble score could you get with Kyrgyzstan?


None. No proper nouns. :wink:

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 1:52 pm UTC
by jestingrabbit
I heard they were going to stupidify scrabble, but they're just introducing a variant.

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 1:54 pm UTC
by olubunmi
I once wrote 'Moldavia' during a game of scrabble. I'd say that's pretty close.

As for the coup, it isn't the bloodiest coup in history. Sofar at least. I for one hope that the former president and the opposition will start a debate soon.
I'd hate to see this turn in a civil war of some sort.

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 2:40 pm UTC
by The Reaper
Well, heres to hoping the people get the government they need/want after this fiasco is done with.

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 11:52 pm UTC
by scikidus
Felstaff wrote:Fixed your Topic Title for you.

Thanks, I only discovered the "é" key on my iTouch after posting this today.
Felstaff wrote:it felt a little ominous when the opposition 'invited' the exiled premier to 'show himself' so that they could 'talk'. Seeing as it was far from a bloodless coup, I doubt this will happen, and there appears to be foreshadowing of an uprising from the south, where the president's support is stronger.

The country ranks 110th in population (around 5.3 million) so the result of any further conflict is going to seriously impact the citizens (high casuality per 100 ratio).
Felstaff wrote:And iii.) what kind of scrabble score could you get with Kyrgyzstan?

You'd have to build off the pre-existing word "tan" mind you, but it's doable.

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Fri Apr 09, 2010 1:03 pm UTC
by Elvish Pillager
scikidus wrote:
Felstaff wrote:And iii.) what kind of scrabble score could you get with Kyrgyzstan?

You'd have to build off the pre-existing word "tan" mind you, but it's doable.

That or "an" and an "s" (or another letter) from another word. This is actually preferable, since it lets you triple the word score twice (while working from "tan" only lets you hit one triple word score.)

So, (5 + 4 + 1 + (2*2) + 4 + 10 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1) * 3 * 3 + 50
=
338

Anyone have a way to do better?

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 5:42 pm UTC
by NightStar
How are you laying more than seven tiles at once?

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 6:29 pm UTC
by Elvish Pillager
NightStar wrote:How are you laying more than seven tiles at once?

I'm only laying KYRGYZT. You still get points for the letters that are already on the board, you just don't get the benefits of any extra-score tiles they cover.

Re: Coup d'état in Kyrgyzstan

Posted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 9:49 pm UTC
by alphawolf29
I think we need to change the title topic to "Western Asia, Scrabble, and You."