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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 4:35 pm UTC
by CorruptUser
Because you can't make 20 years of salary last for 60 years of adulthood even with the pension? Many cops "double dip", where they spend 20 years enlisted and 20 years as a cop to get two pensions instead of one (honestly, the ex-mil cops are probably the best ones), and it's even possible for a cop that gets a job as a mail carrier while being in the army reserve throughout can get three pensions.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Nov 10, 2018 8:24 pm UTC
by ijuin
It’s not that cops who are fired for violence should never be hired for any job ever again—it’s that they should not be hired for jobs that involve potential violence as part of the job—e.g. law enforcement and security jobs. They should be employed in nice safe desk jobs instead where they won’t be prone to getting into violent incidents.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 1:54 am UTC
by gmalivuk
Nah my point was that I am entirely okay with former cops being unhirable.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 2:06 am UTC
by Thesh
I think we need a program to help rehabilitate cops so they can become productive members of society

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:02 pm UTC
by jewish_scientist
This story is less about the police doing wrong and more about a large company using the police to do wrong, but this was the closest thread to that topic I could find.

Basically, many 7-11 stores are owned by private individuals who then give a large part of their income to the larger company. If a store violates the agreement, then the large company can take possession of it from the owners. Allegedly, the company is encouraging ICE to target its stores, because violation of immigration laws is also a violation of the agreement. The company also has a history of doing controversial actions in an attempt to gain control of the stores.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:28 pm UTC
by sardia

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 7:15 pm UTC
by Angua

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 8:42 pm UTC
by idonno
Isn't it a bad idea to shoot someone who has a gun held to a hostage because an involuntary jerk can cause the gun to discharge and shoot the hostage. Even if he had been "the bad guy", I'm pretty sure this was an awful response that could have gotten the other guy, the one who they were supposedly trying to protect, killed.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 8:57 pm UTC
by jewish_scientist
sardia wrote:https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-11-09/7-eleven-is-at-war-with-its-own-franchisees-over-ice-raids?srnd=businessweek-v2
Actual link.

Oops. I have no idea how that happened.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 11:44 pm UTC
by Euphonium
Honestly, willingness to sign up to wield a baton against your neighbors in the first place, is itself a sign of moral unfitness to do the task.

Anyone who wants to be a cop ipso facto lacks the character necessary to do so.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:43 am UTC
by The Great Hippo
Literally, the only person who died was the one person who was doing his job. He was shot and killed by the police.

If the police had simply failed to show up, no one would have died.

I have a suspicion this is true in a lot of cases.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 9:41 am UTC
by Angua
Does ICE count in here? I feel like it should.

ICE argues that they shouldn't be held liable for criminal institutional assualt because it's consensual and 'they're not a jail or prison'.

https://www.aclu.org/blog/immigrants-rights/immigrants-rights-and-detention/ice-detention-center-says-its-not-responsible?fbclid=IwAR36ebnwYHe5i-0dVCqDqkaTVswOQdSorUk_X64ZqjpQbbcL793G2V2aDBo

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:32 pm UTC
by sardia
Angua wrote:Does ICE count in here? I feel like it should.

ICE argues that they shouldn't be held liable for criminal institutional assualt because it's consensual and 'they're not a jail or prison'.

https://www.aclu.org/blog/immigrants-rights/immigrants-rights-and-detention/ice-detention-center-says-its-not-responsible?fbclid=IwAR36ebnwYHe5i-0dVCqDqkaTVswOQdSorUk_X64ZqjpQbbcL793G2V2aDBo

I doubt the anti immigration faction thought far enough ahead to plan systemic rape into their conga line of awfulness. This is like a bug that they'll say is a feature. Using contractors to weasel out of responsibility is a time honored practice of scum everywhere.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 8:53 pm UTC
by The Great Hippo
Angua wrote:Does ICE count in here? I feel like it should.

ICE argues that they shouldn't be held liable for criminal institutional assualt because it's consensual and 'they're not a jail or prison'.

https://www.aclu.org/blog/immigrants-rights/immigrants-rights-and-detention/ice-detention-center-says-its-not-responsible?fbclid=IwAR36ebnwYHe5i-0dVCqDqkaTVswOQdSorUk_X64ZqjpQbbcL793G2V2aDBo
Jesus fucking Christ.

How the fuck can you work for ICE, go home at the end of the day, and tell yourself that you're a good person who did a good job?

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 9:01 pm UTC
by sardia
The same way a diplomat for the US can. Did you know that a branch of ice brought down an immigration crime ring that was robbing illegals with fake visas?
The government is a big place.

That said, this is fucking awful as a defense. I hope they lose hard.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 10:22 pm UTC
by CorruptUser
Umm. Wow. Just... wow. I can't even.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 1:53 am UTC
by Coyne
Angua wrote:Does ICE count in here? I feel like it should.

ICE argues that they shouldn't be held liable for criminal institutional assualt because it's consensual and 'they're not a jail or prison'.

https://www.aclu.org/blog/immigrants-rights/immigrants-rights-and-detention/ice-detention-center-says-its-not-responsible?fbclid=IwAR36ebnwYHe5i-0dVCqDqkaTVswOQdSorUk_X64ZqjpQbbcL793G2V2aDBo

Fail: Confuses "consent" and "submit."

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 2:27 am UTC
by jewish_scientist
Bureau of Justice Statistics wrote:PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act] applies to all correctional facilities, including prisons, jails, juvenile facilities, military and Indian country facilities, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facilities.


I get a feeling I know who is going to lose this case.

https://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=20

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:37 am UTC
by Coyne
Bureau of Justice Statistics wrote:PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act] applies to all correctional facilities, including prisons, jails, juvenile facilities, military and Indian country facilities, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facilities.


Seriously? Did you read that? PREA doesn't do anything about the pot boiling over, it's only about watching the pot boil over. The sexual assaults at ICE facilities will be carefully recorded in a spreadsheet.

Edit: quoted the wrong article from the thread

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 5:27 pm UTC
by Pfhorrest
I think the point of quoting PREA was to confirm that contrary to what ICE is saying, their detention centers are in fact correctional facilities just like prisons and subject to the same rules.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 5:54 pm UTC
by sardia
Pfhorrest wrote:I think the point of quoting PREA was to confirm that contrary to what ICE is saying, their detention centers are in fact correctional facilities just like prisons and subject to the same rules.

Unless of course they're fucking ballsy and refuse to categorize contracted buildings as prisons. They can do this because they're hoping nobody is going to fully challenge the bureaucracy. Same reason cops are always in danger for their lives. Just a rubber stamp lie to get away with misconduct.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 7:28 pm UTC
by jewish_scientist
I do not even know what to say about this.

Boston Globe wrote:The previously undisclosed program, called “Quiet Skies,” specifically targets travelers who “are not under investigation by any agency and are not in the Terrorist Screening Data Base,” according to a Transportation Security Administration bulletin in March.

The internal bulletin describes the program’s goal as thwarting threats to commercial aircraft “posed by unknown or partially known terrorists,” and gives the agency broad discretion over which air travelers to focus on and how closely they are tracked.

But some air marshals, in interviews and internal communications shared with the Globe, say the program has them tasked with shadowing travelers who appear to pose no real threat — a businesswoman who happened to have traveled through a Mideast hot spot, in one case; a Southwest Airlines flight attendant, in another; a fellow federal law enforcement officer, in a third.

It is a time-consuming and costly assignment, they say, which saps their ability to do more vital law enforcement work.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:49 am UTC
by WriteBrainedJR
Well, I know exactly what to say. It rhymes with "muck" and people usually say it about "tha police." Only this time, I'm saying it about the USA PATRIOT Act and the TSA.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 1:13 am UTC
by The Great Hippo
What does this even accomplish? Is this genuinely better than choosing who to follow based on rolling dice and consulting a random encounter table?

Subject exhibited Behavior Indicators. (If observed, check any that apply below)

Rubbing/wringing of hands
Strong body odor
Sweaty palms
Trembling
Cold penetrating stare
Spoiler:
stare.gif
stare.gif (851.12 KiB) Viewed 5816 times

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 1:55 am UTC
by ijuin
So in other words, nervous people are up to no good, as opposed to being, say, afraid of flying due to phobia or fear of terrorist attacks?

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:39 am UTC
by Dauric
ijuin wrote:So in other words, nervous people are up to no good, as opposed to being, say, afraid of flying due to phobia or fear of terrorist attacks?

... or afraid of TSA and their 'nudity scanners'...

(Yes I know the scanners don't provide suitably wankable images (though Rule 34...), but that doesn't mean the flying public understands they're not being seen in their alltogether nudity).

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:44 am UTC
by CorruptUser
Dauric wrote:
ijuin wrote:So in other words, nervous people are up to no good, as opposed to being, say, afraid of flying due to phobia or fear of terrorist attacks?

... or afraid of TSA and their 'nudity scanners'...

(Yes I know the scanners don't provide suitably wankable images (though Rule 34...), but that doesn't mean the flying public understands they're not being seen in their alltogether nudity).


Are you sure that's not how the airport scanners work?

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:25 pm UTC
by Sableagle
The Great Hippo wrote:
Subject exhibited Behavior Indicators. (If observed, check any that apply below)

Strong body odor
Sweaty palms
So ... anyone who's making a long three-changes flight back from any remote place via airports without good air conditioning, then?

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 2:01 am UTC
by Thesh
4 year old kid spends 8 hours locked in minivan at police impound.

http://www.wsfa.com/2018/11/14/year-old ... e-impound/

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:49 pm UTC
by ObsessoMom
Some rare positive news on the civil asset forfeiture front (which allows police to do things like confiscate and sell a car that has transported illegal drugs, and pocket the money to fund their department):

Neil Gorsuch and Sonia Sotomayor Just Came Out Swinging Against Policing for Profit

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:52 pm UTC
by CorruptUser
ObsessoMom wrote:which allows police to do things like confiscate without due process and sell a car that has allegedly transported illegal drugs


Fix'd that for you.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:57 pm UTC
by ObsessoMom
CorruptUser wrote:
ObsessoMom wrote:which allows police to do things like confiscate without due process and sell a car that has allegedly transported illegal drugs


Fix'd that for you.


Correct. Thanks.

Other examples from the article (there are links to sources in the original--these outrageous cases are, sadly, real), followed by discussion of how the other US Supreme Court justices might rule:

In Philadelphia, prosecutors seized one couple’s house because their son was arrested with $40 worth of drugs. Officials there seized 1,000 other houses and 3,300 vehicles before a 2018 settlement that led to reparations for victims. In 2014, federal prosecutors used asset forfeiture to take more stuff than burglars. One Texas police department seized property from out-of-town drivers, then colluded with the district attorney to coerce these drivers into waiving their rights. Law enforcement frequently targets poor people and racial minorities, figuring they are unable to fight back.

Although he said nothing on Wednesday (as usual), Justice Clarence Thomas is one of the court’s fiercest critics of civil asset forfeiture. In 2017, he wrote a solo opinion urging the court to rein in the practice. Citing its “egregious and well-chronicled abuses,” Thomas asserted that the Constitution likely does not allow police to “seize property with limited judicial oversight and retain it for their own use.” And in 1998, he authored a 5–4 decision, joined only by the liberals, outlawing forfeitures that are “grossly disproportional to the gravity of [the] offense.”

So while Gorsuch and Sotomayor led the fight on Wednesday, there’s probably a cross-ideological coalition of justices prepared to invalidate excessive forfeitures. Such a ruling would reflect broad agreement across the ideological spectrum that forfeiture has gone too far. Among the organizations that wrote or joined amicus briefs supporting Timbs [the guy whose car was taken in the case now being decided] are the progressive ACLU and NAACP; the libertarian Cato and Goldwater institutes, as well as the Pacific Legal Foundation; the conservative Chamber of Commerce and Judicial Watch; and the fundamentalist Foundation for Moral Law, which is “dedicated to the defense of God-given liberties.”

Only Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito expressed any interest in allowing civil asset forfeiture to continue unabated. A majority of the court seems poised to rule that all 50 states must stop seizing property in a way that’s grossly disproportionate to the crime committed—a holy grail of criminal justice reformers. In one fell swoop, defendants will receive new protections against the legalized theft of their stuff. And Tyson Timbs, who attended Wednesday’s argument, can demand that Indiana return the Land Rover that it never had a right to seize in the first place.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 6:03 pm UTC
by CorruptUser
Uhh... the writers of that piece, do know what the word "fell" in "fell swoop" means, right? It is etymologically related to the word "felon"...

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 6:17 pm UTC
by Thesh
Who cares what the etymology is? "One fell swoop" is a common phrase, and thus the meaning is independent of the individual words. Every word in that sentence can change its meaning over time, and the phrase will mean the exact same thing.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 2:20 pm UTC
by solune
Thesh wrote:Who cares what the etymology is? "One fell swoop" is a common phrase, and thus the meaning is independent of the individual words. Every word in that sentence can change its meaning over time, and the phrase will mean the exact same thing.


This is not always true. The phrase "begging the question" has changed meaning because nobody remembers the other meaning of "to beg"

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Fri Dec 21, 2018 8:30 pm UTC
by WriteBrainedJR
So the police can still shoot your dog with impunity, and they can still shoot you with impunity if you're black, but they can no longer steal your shit.

I suppose that's an improvement.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Dec 22, 2018 5:40 am UTC
by ObsessoMom

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Dec 22, 2018 8:17 am UTC
by Grop
They should read the manual again, because Satan doesn't kill people.

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Dec 22, 2018 2:56 pm UTC
by Coyne
Well, they shouldn't have posted that because apparently, now that they've "promoted religion," everyone will be embracing Satan.

Or maybe the post means everyone already has embraced Satan? I don't know, I'm very confused by the whole thing.

I mean, between the one group of idiots and the other...

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Posted: Sat Dec 22, 2018 3:37 pm UTC
by Dauric
Coyne wrote:Well, they shouldn't have posted that because apparently, now that they've "promoted religion," everyone will be embracing Satan.

Or maybe the post means everyone already has embraced Satan? I don't know, I'm very confused by the whole thing.

I mean, between the one group of idiots and the other...


Nothing to be confused about, it's pretty standard Culture Wars stuff. The society is changing and there's a plurality/majority embracing that change, the person(s) posting disagree with the nature of the change because it makes them feel uncomfortable* and in a fit of tribalism equate change with evil, therefore the society at large changing and adapting is "embracing evil ("satan" being a traditional avatar of evil). The connection to everything objectively bad (ie: theft, murder) with the subjectively bad (ie: multiculturalism, #metoo, tolerance for LBGTQ, etc.) is pretty clear to those who believe their subjective opinions are objective.

*discomfort coming both from a fear of the new and the invalidation of their cherished traditions.