1133: "Up Goer Five"

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Xodiac
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Xodiac » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:12 am UTC

A greater challenge would have been to use EVERY ONE of the ten hundred most-used words in the English language, once each.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby rockym93 » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:27 am UTC

I went to register to post in this thread and found out that my regular username was already taken. Apparently I made an account 4 years ago and posted a whole bunch and then suffered amnesia about the whole experience.

Anyway:

I made this into a wallpaper! Mostly by turning it sideways. I hope that's okay?
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby tomintx » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:35 am UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
Unclevertitle wrote:But that's ancient mythology, we know Saturn as a planet. A world that flies in the sky. Substitute fly with go. And where is the sky? Isn't it up?
So a planet is 'a world that goes up.' An 'Up Goer' in the more traditional sense.
The rocket was named after the god rather than the planet, though.

Umm... Wasn't the planet also named after the god?

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby tomintx » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:44 am UTC

Tazzik wrote:So, in summary, it is an interesting idea, but the hardest part of a rocket launch is not altitude, but rather orbital velocity.

Orbital velocity is the reason we launch as close to the equator as practicable. We get some free velocity from the spin of the planet we're on. It also helps that we have a big ocean out there so we won't damage anything on the ground if the part at the bottom starts to point at the sky.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby CatOfGrey » Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:13 am UTC

Randall couldn't use "Water-making-air" for hydrogen?

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby dudiobugtron » Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:29 am UTC

CatOfGrey wrote:Randall couldn't use "Water-making-air" for hydrogen?

Water-making-air is clouds. :P
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Pfhorrest » Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:36 am UTC

But "water-maker" is the literal etymology of "hydrogen". It's the gas ("air") that makes water when burned.
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby da Doctah » Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:08 am UTC

Unclevertitle wrote:Although looking it up, apparently Saturn is the god of agriculture. So he'd be the big guy in the sky of making plants grow. Substituting plants with 'things' or 'stuff' and grow with 'go up' Saturn is then the big guy in the sky making things go up. If a grower is one who grows then an up goer is one who goes up then Saturn, a mythical deific grower is an 'Up Goer Maker.' But 'Up Goer Maker Five' would have just confused everybody, until it was patently obvious Randall was talking about the Saturn V.

But that's ancient mythology, we know Saturn as a planet. A world that flies in the sky. Substitute fly with go. And where is the sky? Isn't it up?
So a planet is 'a world that goes up.' An 'Up Goer' in the more traditional sense.


The names of the planets in Japanese consist of an Asian alchemical element followed by the kanji for "star": Mercury is "water star", Venus "gold star", Mars "fire star", Jupiter "wood star" and Saturn "soil star". (As for the new kids, Uranus is "sky king star", Neptune "sea king star" and poor demoted Pluto was "dark king star".)

Since the top ten hundred words probably don't include "soil", Saturn could be rendered as "earth star", which would add a whole new layer of cross-referencing.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Klear » Tue Nov 13, 2012 9:20 am UTC

da Doctah wrote:
Unclevertitle wrote:Since the top ten hundred words probably don't include "soil", Saturn could be rendered as "earth star", which would add a whole new layer of cross-referencing.


Earth star is EXTREMELY confusing.

Also, I think God would be more common on a list made from most often said words. I think it's probable that the lists of most used words are only taking written sources into consideration.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby AvatarIII » Tue Nov 13, 2012 11:23 am UTC

da Doctah wrote:
Unclevertitle wrote:Although looking it up, apparently Saturn is the god of agriculture. So he'd be the big guy in the sky of making plants grow. Substituting plants with 'things' or 'stuff' and grow with 'go up' Saturn is then the big guy in the sky making things go up. If a grower is one who grows then an up goer is one who goes up then Saturn, a mythical deific grower is an 'Up Goer Maker.' But 'Up Goer Maker Five' would have just confused everybody, until it was patently obvious Randall was talking about the Saturn V.

But that's ancient mythology, we know Saturn as a planet. A world that flies in the sky. Substitute fly with go. And where is the sky? Isn't it up?
So a planet is 'a world that goes up.' An 'Up Goer' in the more traditional sense.


The names of the planets in Japanese consist of an Asian alchemical element followed by the kanji for "star": Mercury is "water star", Venus "gold star", Mars "fire star", Jupiter "wood star" and Saturn "soil star". (As for the new kids, Uranus is "sky king star", Neptune "sea king star" and poor demoted Pluto was "dark king star".)

Since the top ten hundred words probably don't include "soil", Saturn could be rendered as "earth star", which would add a whole new layer of cross-referencing.


actually soil is 638 on this list http://www.rupert.id.au/resources/1000-words.php

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Klear » Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:29 pm UTC

AvatarIII wrote:actually soil is 638 on this list http://www.rupert.id.au/resources/1000-words.php


Soil is among the 1000 most used words? Wow... I think I just soiled my pants.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby AvatarIII » Tue Nov 13, 2012 1:08 pm UTC

Klear wrote:
AvatarIII wrote:actually soil is 638 on this list http://www.rupert.id.au/resources/1000-words.php


Soil is among the 1000 most used words? Wow... I think I just soiled my pants.


Not surprising, it has already been used 3 times in this short exchange.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Klear » Tue Nov 13, 2012 1:11 pm UTC

AvatarIII wrote:
Klear wrote:
AvatarIII wrote:actually soil is 638 on this list http://www.rupert.id.au/resources/1000-words.php


Soil is among the 1000 most used words? Wow... I think I just soiled my pants.


Not surprising, it has already been used 3 times in this short exchange.


Oh damn, I'm helping it, am I not?

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby rmsgrey » Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:09 pm UTC

I assume the "US" in the blueprints is not "U.S." but the first person plural pronoun "us", though I could be wrong.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby mathmannix » Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:54 pm UTC

dulcimoo wrote:A couple of things....

2nd. Saturn was the father of Zeus. Maybe Old Old God or Dad of Dad God or something might have worked.

So maybe ... Dad of Dad God Five Up Goer Thing might be good.


For the record, Saturn wasn't the father of Zeus - two different mythologies. Cronus in Greek mythology was the earlier sky-king-god and harvest-god who was the father of Zeus; Saturn was the Roman god of agriculture, and earlier king-god, who, when Greek and Roman cultures merged, was identified with Cronus and was the father of Zeus' counterpart, Jupiter. Of course, the mythology changed over time, and eventually people seem to have mixed up "Cronus" with "Chronos" and made Saturn the god of time as well. Saturn/Cronus was also known for holding a sickle - both for agriculture, and for castrating his father, Uranus, the personifcation of the sky. Cronus' name may come from the root meaning "cut". All this seemed to have been absorbed into Saturn's theobiography. (It's really quite confusing, due to the merging of the mythologies; check out the two articles.)

Anyway, using http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Wiktionary:Frequency_lists/Contemporary_fiction, we can use something like "plant time god" or "cut[ter] of sky god".
I hear velociraptor tastes like chicken.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Nov 13, 2012 3:36 pm UTC

tomintx wrote:
gmalivuk wrote:The rocket was named after the god rather than the planet, though.
Umm... Wasn't the planet also named after the god?
Yes, of course, but the 1k-word description of the god is very different from the 1k-word description of the planet, and so the distinction is important.

Klear wrote:Also, I think God would be more common on a list made from most often said words. I think it's probable that the lists of most used words are only taking written sources into consideration.
Unless someone has a better suggestion, it would seem the Wiktionary contemporary fiction list, which is of course based on written language.

That said, I think you're severely overestimating the prevalence of religious conversation, especially compared strictly to written fiction. Yes, it's much more frequent in both speaking and in fiction than it is in, say, newspapers and academic journals, but I don't think it's much more frequent in speaking than in fiction. At least, not enough to move significantly up the ranking.
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Klear » Tue Nov 13, 2012 3:53 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
Klear wrote:Also, I think God would be more common on a list made from most often said words. I think it's probable that the lists of most used words are only taking written sources into consideration.
Unless someone has a better suggestion, it would seem the Wiktionary contemporary fiction list, which is of course based on written language.

That said, I think you're severely overestimating the prevalence of religious conversation, especially compared strictly to written fiction. Yes, it's much more frequent in both speaking and in fiction than it is in, say, newspapers and academic journals, but I don't think it's much more frequent in speaking than in fiction. At least, not enough to move significantly up the ranking.


Oh god, I think you misunderstood me. I'm not thinking about religious conversations at all, god dammit! I'm talking about swearing and other phrases like that, zeppelin!

Edit: I've seen pornos where the words "Oh my god" were by far the most often uttered =)

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby mike.s » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:17 pm UTC

I'm surprised that nobody noticed that the capsule is a Block I


Coo! Well spotted - I hadn't noticed the CM/SM umbilical was on the hatch side.

Well, if we're going to be that picky ... :)

The Instrument Unit did not hold "most of the c omputers"* - it had the LVDC (Launch Vehicle Digital C omputer), but the CM had an AGC (Apollo Guidance C omputer) and the LM had both an AGC and AEA (Abort Electronic Assembly).

* (sorry for the spacing, but for some reason that word triggers the spam filter)

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby orthogon » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:18 pm UTC

The hardest thing about making this was probably not being able to use the word "raptor".
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Loadstone » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:29 pm UTC

About five words in, my internal RvB Caboose voice kicked in.

Hilarity ensued.
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Rotherian » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:31 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
tomintx wrote:
gmalivuk wrote:The rocket was named after the god rather than the planet, though.
Umm... Wasn't the planet also named after the god?
Yes, of course, but the 1k-word description of the god is very different from the 1k-word description of the planet, and so the distinction is important.

Klear wrote:Also, I think God would be more common on a list made from most often said words. I think it's probable that the lists of most used words are only taking written sources into consideration.
Unless someone has a better suggestion, it would seem the Wiktionary contemporary fiction list, which is of course based on written language.

That said, I think you're severely overestimating the prevalence of religious conversation, especially compared strictly to written fiction. Yes, it's much more frequent in both speaking and in fiction than it is in, say, newspapers and academic journals, but I don't think it's much more frequent in speaking than in fiction. At least, not enough to move significantly up the ranking.


Wait a minute. Religious conversations (written - though, admittedly written religious conversations would probably be known as correspondence) don't fall within the category of written fiction? (Although, I suppose that spoken religious conversations could fit into the oral fiction category.)
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby dp2 » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:36 pm UTC

BAReFOOt wrote:To see how far this went, look at Microsoft, “bragging” that Windows 8 can be used by a 3-year old. You know how dumb that is? A grown chimpanzee has the intelligence of a 4-year old! That means that the Windows 8 UI… being not much different in difficulty to a Apple or Android UI btw.… literally expects you to be dumber than a chimpanzee!!
We’re far past MS Clippy here. We’re past (Google/Apple) auto-correct overriding you because it thinks it is smarter than you. We’re deep in Idiocracy territory.

A three-year old can use a toilet. That doesn't mean you're expected to be dumber than a chimp to use one.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Rotherian » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:42 pm UTC

dp2 wrote:
BAReFOOt wrote:To see how far this went, look at Microsoft, “bragging” that Windows 8 can be used by a 3-year old. You know how dumb that is? A grown chimpanzee has the intelligence of a 4-year old! That means that the Windows 8 UI… being not much different in difficulty to a Apple or Android UI btw.… literally expects you to be dumber than a chimpanzee!!
We’re far past MS Clippy here. We’re past (Google/Apple) auto-correct overriding you because it thinks it is smarter than you. We’re deep in Idiocracy territory.

A three-year old can use a toilet. That doesn't mean you're expected to be dumber than a chimp to use one.


As a father of three children, I can attest to the bolded sentence. Getting them to grasp the concept of properly wiping, on the other hand, is a completely different matter. :shock:
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby speising » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:43 pm UTC

I'm questioning the use of some words here. While "space" may be on the list, it surely isn't there for the meaning "outer space". Someone who's education includes only those basic words/meanings, couldn't make any sense of it.
so, "space" would be, maybe, "where there is no air", "far away", or something.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby speising » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:44 pm UTC

Rotherian wrote:As a father of three children, I can attest to the bolded sentence. Getting them to grasp the concept of properly wiping, on the other hand, is a completely different matter. :shock:


as long as they only do it on the other hand... :)

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:45 pm UTC

Rotherian wrote:Wait a minute. Religious conversations (written - though, admittedly written religious conversations would probably be known as correspondence) don't fall within the category of written fiction? (Although, I suppose that spoken religious conversations could fit into the oral fiction category.)
Nice completely ineffective jab at religious belief, there.

"Do you believe in a god?"
"No, I think belief in a god is pretty ridiculous, actually?"

This is a religious conversation. Please point out where the fiction lies?
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby rmsgrey » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:49 pm UTC

Rotherian wrote:Wait a minute. Religious conversations (written - though, admittedly written religious conversations would probably be known as correspondence) don't fall within the category of written fiction? (Although, I suppose that spoken religious conversations could fit into the oral fiction category.)


"Fiction" implies being deliberately or knowingly contrary to fact. Most religious conversations are held in good faith, so are not fiction.

If you regard religious conversations as fiction, then school science lessons are definitely fiction - any qualified science teacher should know that what they're teaching is a (useful) lie - that, for example, the planetary model of atoms is no more correct than the plum-pudding model...

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby SerialTroll » Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:02 pm UTC

rmsgrey wrote:
Rotherian wrote:Wait a minute. Religious conversations (written - though, admittedly written religious conversations would probably be known as correspondence) don't fall within the category of written fiction? (Although, I suppose that spoken religious conversations could fit into the oral fiction category.)


"Fiction" implies being deliberately or knowingly contrary to fact. Most religious conversations are held in good faith, so are not fiction.

If you regard religious conversations as fiction, then school science lessons are definitely fiction - any qualified science teacher should know that what they're teaching is a (useful) lie - that, for example, the planetary model of atoms is no more correct than the plum-pudding model...


Ah, I remember in middle school putting together a planetary model on my TRS-80. It worked very well with the exception of accumulation of floating point errors over a period of days (planets would gradually migrate outwards). I loved creating complex solar systems complete with sun, planets and moons.

I then used my knowledge to simulate atoms. But it failed miserably. I thought I could just plug in new constant values for electro-weak and elctro-strong forces (I think there was another constant or two). I could never even model an atom, much less the complex molecules I had in mind. When I started out, I was naive enough to think I could simulate chemical reactions and do things on a computer that folks were doing IRL experiments. What was worse is I couldn't get anyone to tell me what I was doing wrong, simply vacant looks from instructors.

Yeah, not totally related to the topic at hand, but it brought back some fun and frustrating memories.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Klear » Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:03 pm UTC

rmsgrey wrote:Most religious conversations are held in good faith [...]


I love this quote.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby JustDoug » Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:57 pm UTC

tomandlu wrote:Do they take any spare nitrogen or just recycle efficiently (or use helium instead)?


If you're referring to the breathing mix... Apollo, and most early Amercian manned space missions, used low-pressure pure oxygen for that. Aside from being less complex- just scrub the CO2 and make up the used O2- it also removed any worries about the bends in the event of decompression. It also meant less atmospheric pressure that had to be contained. No need for the extra weight another gas would present. Also, liquid oxygen was already abundantly present, being one of the primary consumables already being used all over the place.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Rotherian » Tue Nov 13, 2012 6:55 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
Rotherian wrote:Wait a minute. Religious conversations (written - though, admittedly written religious conversations would probably be known as correspondence) don't fall within the category of written fiction? (Although, I suppose that spoken religious conversations could fit into the oral fiction category.)
Nice completely ineffective jab at religious belief, there.

"Do you believe in a god?"
"No, I think belief in a god is pretty ridiculous, actually?"

This is a religious conversation. Please point out where the fiction lies?


That is equivalent to saying that the following conversation is a political conversation:

"Did you vote?"
"No, I didn't really like any of the candidates."

While it is true that the first is a "religious" conversation, and the second is a "political" conversation, neither is representative of the more common conversations of its type. I'm reasonably sure that you are aware of this, and you are just trying to mess with me - like I was trying to mess with others. To that, I say, "Well played."
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby J Thomas » Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:15 pm UTC

dp2 wrote:
BAReFOOt wrote:To see how far this went, look at Microsoft, “bragging” that Windows 8 can be used by a 3-year old. You know how dumb that is? A grown chimpanzee has the intelligence of a 4-year old! That means that the Windows 8 UI… being not much different in difficulty to a Apple or Android UI btw.… literally expects you to be dumber than a chimpanzee!!
We’re far past MS Clippy here. We’re past (Google/Apple) auto-correct overriding you because it thinks it is smarter than you. We’re deep in Idiocracy territory.

A three-year old can use a toilet. That doesn't mean you're expected to be dumber than a chimp to use one.


Murphy's technology law #9:
Build a system that even a fool can use and only a fool will want to use it.
http://www.opundo.com/murphyslaws.htm
The Law of Fives is true. I see it everywhere I look for it.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby mathmannix » Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:16 pm UTC

So if a solipsist were in charge of a library...
I hear velociraptor tastes like chicken.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:34 pm UTC

AvatarIII wrote:Liters... what an ugly spelling, litres is much nicer.

The French pronunciation is much nicer too, but I bet you don't use it.
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:39 pm UTC

Yeah, the British love to very pointedly mis-stress every French loanword they can find, and yet they insist on keeping French spellings for some reason.
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Tue Nov 13, 2012 9:11 pm UTC

I propose the we, as a community, make "won't go to space" a euphemism for death.
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby dudiobugtron » Tue Nov 13, 2012 9:31 pm UTC

Quizatzhaderac wrote:I propose the we, as a community, make "won't go to space" a euphemism for death.

I love it. So-and-so is having a bad problem. She won't go to space today. Or maybe ever.
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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby mathmannix » Tue Nov 13, 2012 9:33 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:The hardest thing about making this was probably not being able to use the word "raptor".


OK, I've been trying to come up with a synonym for raptor, using the wiktionary list above. How about

very-bad all-dead no-fly animal of early fly-animal type (from third big-animal age)


(I missed having the words "evil", "extinct", "bird", "feather", and of course "Cretaceous" and "dinosaur")

Unfortunately, raptors were not part of the Saturn V design. So they won't go to space*.

Spoiler:
* - Maybe ever.
I hear velociraptor tastes like chicken.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby speising » Tue Nov 13, 2012 9:54 pm UTC

Of course, 1000 words is still quite a lot.
What about Toki Pona? This language consists of only 123 words.

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Re: 1133: "Up Goer Five"

Postby orthogon » Wed Nov 14, 2012 9:04 am UTC

mathmannix wrote:
orthogon wrote:The hardest thing about making this was probably not being able to use the word "raptor".


OK, I've been trying to come up with a synonym for raptor, using the wiktionary list above. How about

very-bad all-dead no-fly animal of early fly-animal type (from third big-animal age)


(I missed having the words "evil", "extinct", "bird", "feather", and of course "Cretaceous" and "dinosaur")

Unfortunately, raptors were not part of the Saturn V design. So they won't go to space*.

Spoiler:
* - Maybe ever.


Oh man, surely Raptors in a Rocket has to be the next Hollywood blockbuster?
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.


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