1190: "Time"

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby edo » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:45 pm UTC

boozledorf wrote:
12obin wrote:
Smithers wrote:What a difference the comma makes in "Helping your uncle Jack, off his horse" and "Let's eat, Grandma".


Surely if you were instructing me to assist my uncle Jack in dismounting a horse, "Help your uncle Jack off his horse", with no comma, would be correct. Ambiguous, yes, but it's a correct way to say it.
I was trying to come up with a less ambiguous way to say it, without saying "dismount" I mean, but "Help your uncle get off the horse" sounds pretty bad too now that you've got me thinking that way.
"Help your uncle to stop being on a horse..."

"Help your uncle down from the horse"
"Help your uncle from the horse"
"Help your uncle down"
"Help your uncle to the ground"


or the Monty Pythonesqe: This uncle, called Jack, off from the horse. What we really need is a Genitive.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby 12obin » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:46 pm UTC

Exodies wrote:
boozledorf wrote:
12obin wrote:
Smithers wrote:What a difference the comma makes in "Helping your uncle Jack, off his horse" and "Let's eat, Grandma".


Surely if you were instructing me to assist my uncle Jack in dismounting a horse, "Help your uncle Jack off his horse", with no comma, would be correct. Ambiguous, yes, but it's a correct way to say it.
I was trying to come up with a less ambiguous way to say it, without saying "dismount" I mean, but "Help your uncle get off the horse" sounds pretty bad too now that you've got me thinking that way.
"Help your uncle to stop being on a horse..."

"Help your uncle down from the horse"
"Help your uncle from the horse"
"Help your uncle down"
"Help your uncle to the ground"

"Help your uncle to alight"


Out loud, that sounds like Uncle Jack is in the dark, or trying to ignite a cigarette.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby bigcrag92 » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:51 pm UTC

Exodies wrote:
boozledorf wrote:
12obin wrote:
Smithers wrote:What a difference the comma makes in "Helping your uncle Jack, off his horse" and "Let's eat, Grandma".


Surely if you were instructing me to assist my uncle Jack in dismounting a horse, "Help your uncle Jack off his horse", with no comma, would be correct. Ambiguous, yes, but it's a correct way to say it.
I was trying to come up with a less ambiguous way to say it, without saying "dismount" I mean, but "Help your uncle get off the horse" sounds pretty bad too now that you've got me thinking that way.
"Help your uncle to stop being on a horse..."

"Help your uncle down from the horse"
"Help your uncle from the horse"
"Help your uncle down"
"Help your uncle to the ground"

"Help your uncle to alight"


This is the first time i've seen/read/heard the word alight when i wasn't on a train.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby speising » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:53 pm UTC

boozledorf wrote:
12obin wrote:
Smithers wrote:What a difference the comma makes in "Helping your uncle Jack, off his horse" and "Let's eat, Grandma".


Surely if you were instructing me to assist my uncle Jack in dismounting a horse, "Help your uncle Jack off his horse", with no comma, would be correct. Ambiguous, yes, but it's a correct way to say it.
I was trying to come up with a less ambiguous way to say it, without saying "dismount" I mean, but "Help your uncle get off the horse" sounds pretty bad too now that you've got me thinking that way.
"Help your uncle to stop being on a horse..."

"Help your uncle down from the horse"
"Help your uncle from the horse"
"Help your uncle down"
"Help your uncle to the ground"


or jack could try to "off" a horse.
but why should i help him kill that poor creature?

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Mr Moriaty » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:53 pm UTC

Helper wrote:
Mr Moriaty wrote:do we have a need for some kind of Holy Geophysicist? it seems to be a niche that fake Vatican based pope bloke has missed.
I'm sure there are some rocks that would actually be pretty good at "waiting for it".

But of course. As me, I hearby do solemnly swear, yee art now the Holy Geophysicist.

Now, down to business; I need you to watch the decay of some holy uranium-238.


Ahh now thats the sort of job I can get my teeth into (although they may fall out) for the next 4.5 Billion years. I'll be back in ~39,446,200,000,000 newpix.

This does worry me that the religion has its sights on nuclear capabilities.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Helper » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:56 pm UTC

Mr Moriaty wrote:
Helper wrote:
Mr Moriaty wrote:do we have a need for some kind of Holy Geophysicist? it seems to be a niche that fake Vatican based pope bloke has missed.
I'm sure there are some rocks that would actually be pretty good at "waiting for it".

But of course. As me, I hearby do solemnly swear, yee art now the Holy Geophysicist.

Now, down to business; I need you to watch the decay of some holy uranium-238.


Ahh now thats the sort of job I can get my teeth into (although they may fall out) for the next 4.5 Billion years. I'll be back in ~39,446,200,000,000newpix.

Great! Be sure to brush your teeth and use mouthwash. With flouride. 31. :twisted:
See you soon!
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby swey » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:58 pm UTC

Exodies wrote:
Helper wrote:
mybrainhurts wrote:So you probably also do quotation marks with your fingers? :lol:
OK, at least that's (almost) a standard Pope gesture... :mrgreen:

Well obviously! Dot and all! (Don't ask where the dot comes from...)

I know I shouldn't ask, but this has got me stumped. Where does the dot come from?

well when a mommy period and a daddy period fall in love, they can make whats known as a dot
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Smithers » Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:58 pm UTC

PinkShinyRose wrote:EDIT2: stupid space removal... if I didn't want them, I would not write them...

[ code ] is your friend.

Code: Select all

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Code: Select all

 #
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby azule » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:01 pm UTC

Image
Crenelation.
Image

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Angelastic » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:05 pm UTC

speising wrote:
Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
speising wrote:
Smithers wrote:Also of course, the old favourite, "I'd rather cuddle, then have sex."


how could that be read any other way? "I'd rather cuddle then have sex." is just grammatically wrong, without any other meaning.

Try reading 'than' in place of 'then'.

To be fair, that a grammatical error, not ambiguity.

This is also true of the other examples.

I don't think so (although I could be wrong)... "Let's eat, Grandma" targets grandma and requests to begin eating (non-grandma) food. "Let's eat Grandma" is a request to eat grandma. They're both grammatically valid.

As are "I'd rather cuddle, then have sex" and "I'd rather cuddle than have sex".

But that requires a change to the word 'then/than,' rather than just a comma change.


that's actually what i meant. this example works only in speech, where commas are ambiguous at best, anyway.

Only in whatever accent(s?) 'then' and 'than' are pronounced the same. I don't recall ever hearing such an accent, but given that some people confuse those words, I can only assume it exists. Would anyone care to enlighten me on what that particular merger is called, and which accents have it?
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby azule » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:12 pm UTC

Angelastic wrote:Only in whatever accent(s?) 'then' and 'than' are pronounced the same. I don't recall ever hearing such an accent, but given that some people confuse those words, I can only assume it exists. Would anyone care to enlighten me on what that particular merger is called, and which accents have it?

Mine. Probably something to do with mumbling. A vowel sound followed by a nasal just gets lost when I talk. I have to really over-annunciate to present a distinction. *shrug*
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Smithers » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:14 pm UTC

Angelastic wrote:
speising wrote:
Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
speising wrote:
Smithers wrote:Also of course, the old favourite, "I'd rather cuddle, then have sex."


how could that be read any other way? "I'd rather cuddle then have sex." is just grammatically wrong, without any other meaning.

Try reading 'than' in place of 'then'.

To be fair, that a grammatical error, not ambiguity.

This is also true of the other examples.

I don't think so (although I could be wrong)... "Let's eat, Grandma" targets grandma and requests to begin eating (non-grandma) food. "Let's eat Grandma" is a request to eat grandma. They're both grammatically valid.

As are "I'd rather cuddle, then have sex" and "I'd rather cuddle than have sex".

But that requires a change to the word 'then/than,' rather than just a comma change.


that's actually what i meant. this example works only in speech, where commas are ambiguous at best, anyway.

Only in whatever accent(s?) 'then' and 'than' are pronounced the same. I don't recall ever hearing such an accent, but given that some people confuse those words, I can only assume it exists. Would anyone care to enlighten me on what that particular merger is called, and which accents have it?

As far as I know, there isn't one. But some people still confuse words that sound merely similar, such as 'affects' with 'effects', or 'were' with 'where' and 'wear'.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby SBN » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:18 pm UTC

azule wrote:
Spoiler:
Image

Crenelation.


How's he going to do the top?
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby bigcrag92 » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:19 pm UTC

SBN wrote:
azule wrote:
Spoiler:
Image

Crenelation.


How's he going to do the top?

maybe they built stairs into the back?
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby shurikt » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:20 pm UTC

Angelastic wrote:Only in whatever accent(s?) 'then' and 'than' are pronounced the same. I don't recall ever hearing such an accent, but given that some people confuse those words, I can only assume it exists. Would anyone care to enlighten me on what that particular merger is called, and which accents have it?


The Las Vegas native accent pronounces "then" and "than" the same way. It's common enough that both words are frequently spelled "then" even by college students. On papers, no less.

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Crissa » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:24 pm UTC

Large rivers, such as the Mississippi and others in the central US, have a large bed upon they used to wander, and some still do. The sediment they carry can be large amounts of sand and gravel, which form banks. Large areas can still be flooded, even while the river proper is miles away, and the path of these can and will change.

In much of the world, these rivers are slowly being strangled and harnessed into straight paths, giving rise to transportation and changing the flood dynamics - but also reducing the amount of area of play or wildlife to live. It's a bit of a quandary.

Where I grew up, of course, there weren't any slow-plane rivers to wander, since they cut through mountains. But a mature river does exactly what they describe: They have a sandy shore that was where the river passed in some past year, and is still slightly flooded, while the main body of the river flows along a path far from them.

Interesting they resorted to words to tell us this. I guess because everyone assumed lake or ocean?

-Crissa

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby azule » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:24 pm UTC

SBN wrote:
azule wrote:
Spoiler:
Image

Crenelation.


How's he going to do the top?

It barely matters anymore. It's asymmetric. What's the point? :cry:
Image

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Exodies » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:27 pm UTC

Of course. Have we become mind readers?
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby azule » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:31 pm UTC

I'm going with "no" since I don't know to what you're referring.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Exodies » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:38 pm UTC

Just checking
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Qalyar » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:45 pm UTC

Mr Moriaty wrote:
AionArap wrote:
bigcrag92 wrote:
AionArap wrote:
bigcrag92 wrote:Image
DONG


FTFY

http://xkcd-time.wikia.com/wiki/GONG


I'm well aware of that, but I thought it was established many many Newpix ago that it was to be called either DONG or BONG (and definately not BING).
EDIT: Speaking of which, has it been updated to LONGDONG/LONGBONG yet?


I think LONGDONG is a porn actors surname.


So, only to announce semenated newpix, then?

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby ChronosDragon » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:52 pm UTC

Crissa wrote:Large rivers, such as the Mississippi and others in the central US, have a large bed upon they used to wander, and some still do. The sediment they carry can be large amounts of sand and gravel, which form banks. Large areas can still be flooded, even while the river proper is miles away, and the path of these can and will change.

In much of the world, these rivers are slowly being strangled and harnessed into straight paths, giving rise to transportation and changing the flood dynamics - but also reducing the amount of area of play or wildlife to live. It's a bit of a quandary.

Where I grew up, of course, there weren't any slow-plane rivers to wander, since they cut through mountains. But a mature river does exactly what they describe: They have a sandy shore that was where the river passed in some past year, and is still slightly flooded, while the main body of the river flows along a path far from them.

Interesting they resorted to words to tell us this. I guess because everyone assumed lake or ocean?

-Crissa


This does make a strong case for the body of water being a river. Odd, then, that Cueball insists the water level has been going down (this past week) when evidence clearly shows it's been going up since they started. It would also seem, then, that perhaps the Mound is not a floodwall (which wouldn't work well in sand, anyway) but (under Cueball's construction) a tower.

Interestingly enough, the "Sandcastles = civilization" metaphor is starting to fit better and better. Where did civilization begin? In the fertile river valleys, of course!
Image

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby kryton » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:56 pm UTC

bigcrag92 wrote:
Exodies wrote:
boozledorf wrote:
12obin wrote:
Smithers wrote:What a difference the comma makes in "Helping your uncle Jack, off his horse" and "Let's eat, Grandma".


Surely if you were instructing me to assist my uncle Jack in dismounting a horse, "Help your uncle Jack off his horse", with no comma, would be correct. Ambiguous, yes, but it's a correct way to say it.
I was trying to come up with a less ambiguous way to say it, without saying "dismount" I mean, but "Help your uncle get off the horse" sounds pretty bad too now that you've got me thinking that way.
"Help your uncle to stop being on a horse..."

"Help your uncle down from the horse"
"Help your uncle from the horse"
"Help your uncle down"
"Help your uncle to the ground"

"Help your uncle to alight"


This is the first time i've seen/read/heard the word alight when i wasn't on a train.


To get off of the horse, your uncle you must help.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Moose Anus » Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:59 pm UTC

Mr Moriaty wrote:I think LONGDONG is a porn actors surname.
You mean someone grew up on Longdong Street?
Lemonade? ...Aww, ok.

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Smithers » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:00 pm UTC

Image
AluisioASG wrote:We should begin to have a walltext ritual (like yesterday's pies).

Spoiler:
Battlement
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Crenellation)
Jump to: navigation, search
"Castellated" redirects here. For the hardware item, see castellated nut.
Battlements on the Great Wall of China
Drawing of battlements on a tower
Battlements in Persepolis

A battlement in defensive architecture, such as that of city walls or castles, comprises a parapet (i.e. a defensive low wall between chest-height and head-height), in which rectangular gaps or indentations occur at intervals to allow for the discharge of arrows or other missiles from within the defences. These gaps are termed "crenels" (also known as carnels, embrasures, or wheelers), and a previously unbroken parapet is termed crenellation. Thus a defensive building might be designed and built with battlements, or a manor house might be fortified by adding battlements, where no parapet previously existed, or cutting crenellations into its existing parapet wall. The solid widths between the crenels are called merlons (also cops or kneelers). A wall with battlements is said to be crenelated or embattled. Battlements on walls have protected walkways (chemin de ronde) behind them. On tower or building tops, the (often flat) roof is used as the protected fighting platform.
Contents

1 Etymology
2 Licence to crenellate
3 Machicolations
4 History
5 Development
6 Ancient Rome
7 Italy
8 Middle East and Africa
9 Decorative element
10 See also
11 Notes
12 Sources
13 Further reading
14 External links

Etymology

The term originated in about the 14th century from the Old French word batailler, "to fortify with batailles" (fixed or movable turrets of defence). The word crenel derives from the ancient French cren (modern French cran), meaning a notch, mortice or other gap cut out often to receive another element or fixing. The modern French word for crenel is creneau, also used to describe a gap of any kind, for example a parking space at the side of the road between two cars, interval between groups of marching troops or a timeslot in a broadcast.[1]
Licence to crenellate
Main article: Licence to crenellate

In mediaeval England a licence to crenellate granted the holder permission to fortify their property. Such licences were granted by the king, and by the rulers of the counties palatine within their jurisdictions, i.e. by the Bishops of Durham and the Earls of Chester and after 1351 by the Dukes of Lancaster. The castles in England vastly outnumber the licences to crenellate.[2] Royal pardons were obtainable, on the payment of an arbitrarily determined fine, by a person who had fortified without licence. The surviving records of such licences, generally issued by letters patent, provide valuable evidence for the dating of ancient buildings. A list of licences issued by the English Crown between the 12th and 16th centuries was compiled by Turner & Parker and expanded and corrected by Philip Davis and published in The Castle Studies Group Journal.[3]

There has been academic debate over the purpose of licencing. The view of military-focussed historians is that licencing restricted the number of fortifications that could be used against a royal army. The modern view, proposed notably by Charles Coulson, is that battlements became an architectural status-symbol much sought after by the socially ambitious, in Coulson's words: "Licences to crenellate were mainly symbolic representations of lordly status: castellation was the architectural expression of noble rank".[4] They indicated to the observer that the grantee had obtained "royal recognition, acknowledgment and compliment".[5] They could however provide a basic deterrent against wandering bands of thieves, and it is suggested that the function of battlements was comparable to the modern practice of householders fitting highly visible CC-TV and burglar alarms, often merely dummies. The crown usually did not charge for the granting of such licences, but occasionally charged a fee of about half a mark.[6]
Machicolations

Battlements may be stepped-out to overhang the wall below, and may have openings at their bases between the supporting corbels, through which stones or burning objects could be dropped onto attackers or besiegers; these are known as machicolations.
History
9th cent. BC relief of an Assyrian attack on a walled town with zig-zag shaped battlements

Battlements have been used for thousands of years; the earliest known example is in the palace at Medinet-Abu at Thebes in Egypt, which allegedly derives from Syrian fortresses. Battlements were used in the walls surrounding Assyrian towns, as shown on bas reliefs from Nimrud and elsewhere. Traces of them remain at Mycenae in Greece, and some ancient Greek vases suggest the existence of battlements. The Great Wall of China has battlements.
Development
Cutaway diagram of a tower of Château de Pierrefonds showing its three levels of defensive architecture

In the European battlements of the Middle Ages the crenel comprised one-third of the width of the merlon: the latter, in addition, could be provided with arrow-loops of various shapes (from simply round to cruciform), depending on the weapon being utilized. Late merlons permitted fire from the first firearms. From the 13th century, the merlons could be connected with wooden shutters that provided added protection when closed. The shutters were designed to be opened to allow shooters to fire against the attackers, and closed during reloading.
Ancient Rome

The Romans used low wooden pinnacles for their first aggeres (terreplains). In the battlements of Pompeii, additional protection derived from small internal buttresses or spur walls, against which the defender might stand so as to gain complete protection on one side.
Italy
Gradara Castle, Italy, outer walls 13th.-14th.c., showing on the tower curved v-shaped notches in the merlons

Loop-holes were frequent in Italian battlements, where the merlon has much greater height and a distinctive cap. Italian military architects used the so-called Ghibelline or swallowtail battlement, with V-shaped notches in the tops of the merlon, giving a horn-like effect. This would allow the defender to be protected whilst shooting standing fully upright. The normal rectangular merlons were later nicknamed Guelph[citation needed].
Middle East and Africa

In Muslim and African fortifications, the merlons often were rounded. The battlements of the Arabs had a more decorative and varied character, and were continued from the 13th century onwards not so much for defensive purposes as for a crowning feature to the walls. They serve a function similar to the cresting found in the Spanish Renaissance.
Decorative element

European architects persistently used battlements as a purely decorative feature throughout the Decorated and Perpendicular periods of Gothic architecture. They not only occur on parapets but on the transoms of windows and on the tie-beams of roofs and on screens, and even on Tudor chimney-pots. A further decorative treatment appears in the elaborate paneling of the merlons and that portion of the parapet walls rising above the cornice, by the introduction of quatrefoils and other conventional forms filled with foliage and shield.
See also

Merlon
Embrasure

Notes
This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (July 2010)

^ Larousse Dictionnaire Lexis de la Langue Française, Paris, 1979; Collins French Dictionary Robert
^ Goodall 2011, p.9
^ Davis 2006–7
^ Coulson 1982, p.72, quoted in Davis 2006–7
^ Coulson 1982, p.83, quoted in Davis 2006–7
^ Davis 2006–7, p.228

Sources

Balestracci, D. (1989). "I materiali da costruzione nel castello medievale". Archeologia Medievale (XVI): pp. 227–242.
Coulson, C. (1982). "Hierarchism in Conventual Crenellation". Medieval Archaeology 26: pp. 69–100.
Davis, Philip, 2006–7, 'English Licences to Crenellate: 1199-1567' The Castle Studies Group Journal 20, pp. 226–245
Goodall, John, 2011, The English Castle, London: Yale Books. ISBN 978-0-300-11058-6.
Luisi, R. (1996). Scudi di pietra, I castelli e l’arte della guerra tra Medioevo e Rinascimento. Bari.

Further reading

Coulson, Charles, 1979, "Structural Symbolism in Medieval Castle Architecture" Journal of the British Archaeological Association Vol. 132, pp 73–90
King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (Kraus)
Coulson, C., 1994, "Freedom to Crenellate by Licence - An Historiographical Revision" Nottingham Medieval Studies Vol. 38, pp. 86–137
Coulson, C., 1995, "Battlements and the Bourgeoisie: Municipal Status and the Apparatus of Urban Defence" in Church, Stephen (ed), Medieval Knighthood Vol. 5(Boydell), pp. 119–95
Coulson, C., 2003, Castles in Medieval Society, Oxford University Press.
Coulson, C., Castles in the Medieval Polity - Crenellation, Privilege, and Defence in England, Ireland and Wales.

External links
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Fortifications
Since ancient times

Abatis
Broch
Castra
Circular rampart
City gate
Crannog
Ditch
Defensive wall
Gatehouse
Grad
Hill fort
Palisade
Refuge castle
Stockade
Sudis
Trou de loup
Vallum
Wagon fort

Since Middle Ages

Arrowslit
Barbican
Bartizan
Bastion
Bent entrance
Bergfried
Caltrop
Castle
Concentric castle
Cheval de frise
Citadel
Curtain wall
Drawbridge
Enceinte
Embrasure
Fortified tower
Gate tower
Gabion
Glacis
Guard tower
Gulyay-gorod
Hoarding
Keep
Kremlin (Detinets)
L-plan castle
Machicolation
Moat
Motte-and-bailey
Murder-hole
Neck ditch
Peel tower
Portcullis
Reduit
Shield wall
Toll castle
Tower house
Turret
Wall tower
Ward (Bailey)
Watchtower
Yett

Since early modern period

Bastion
Blockhouse
Breastwork
Canal
Caponier
Casemate
Cavalier
Crownwork
Coupure
Hornwork
Lunette
Ostrog
Outwork
Polygonal fort
Punji sticks
Ravelin
Redoubt
Sandbag
Scarp
Sea fort
Station
Star fort
Tenaille

Since 19th century

Barbed wire
Barbette
Border outpost
Bunker
Coastal artillery
Gun turret
Land battery
Land mine
Outpost
Trench warfare
Sangar
Wire obstacles

Since 20th century

Admiralty scaffolding
Barbed tape
Concertina wire
Defensive fighting position
Spider hole
British "hedgehog" road block
Czech hedgehog
Dragon's teeth
Electric fence
Flak tower
Fire support base
Hesco bastion
Main Line of Resistance
Sentry gun

By topography

Bridge castle
Cave castle
Hill castle
Hill fort
Hillside castle
Hilltop castle
Island castle
Lowland castle
Marsh castle
Ridge castle
Rocca
Rock castle
Spur castle

Categories:

Fortification (architectural elements)
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Medieval defences
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby fhorn » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:02 pm UTC

I love what they've done with the place.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby azule » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:02 pm UTC

kryton wrote:To get off of the horse, your uncle you must help.

You can make anything dirty: "To get off" "of the horse" [sorta like from the presence of the horse], "your uncle" "you must help" ["to get off", of course]. lol
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Smithers » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:04 pm UTC

azule wrote:You can make anything dirty

I'd like to double your entendre.
Lord Randall, Creator of the One True Comic wrote:Wait for it.

Helper wrote:The great thing about this needle-pulled thing be that it tin turn ænig everyday situation into an hilarious nightmare:
Helper goeth to Starbux:
"ic'd like an coffee, please. Hold the baby!"
"hwæt? eow be, like, weird."
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Helper » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:06 pm UTC

Smithers wrote:
azule wrote:You can make anything dirty

I'd like to double your entendre.

I always enjoyed the fact that 'double entendre' sounds like it involves entering something. Twice. :lol:
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Smithers » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:07 pm UTC

Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
azule wrote:You can make anything dirty

I'd like to double your entendre.

I always enjoyed the fact that 'double entendre' sounds like it involves entering something. Twice. :lol:

Also: In-ur-end-o.
Lord Randall, Creator of the One True Comic wrote:Wait for it.

Helper wrote:The great thing about this needle-pulled thing be that it tin turn ænig everyday situation into an hilarious nightmare:
Helper goeth to Starbux:
"ic'd like an coffee, please. Hold the baby!"
"hwæt? eow be, like, weird."
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Mikeski » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:16 pm UTC

Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
azule wrote:You can make anything dirty

I'd like to double your entendre.

I always enjoyed the fact that 'double entendre' sounds like it involves entering something. Twice. :lol:

Double-entry bookkeeping gets you going?

Well, I guess the flip side of Rule 34 is that someone must be turned on by everything thus created.

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby azule » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:17 pm UTC

Helper wrote:I always enjoyed the fact that 'double entendre' sounds like it involves entering something. Twice. :lol:

Or, enter two things once.

Oh what path is this going down on? hehe, "going down on".
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby AionArap » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:19 pm UTC

azule wrote:
Helper wrote:I always enjoyed the fact that 'double entendre' sounds like it involves entering something. Twice. :lol:

Or, enter two things once.

Oh what path is this going down on? hehe, "going down on".


A slippery one?
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby htom » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:22 pm UTC

AionArap wrote:
azule wrote:
Helper wrote:I always enjoyed the fact that 'double entendre' sounds like it involves entering something. Twice. :lol:

Or, enter two things once.

Oh what path is this going down on? hehe, "going down on".


A slippery one?


I'm sure it's not the only cuddling one. Especially if twice is a lower bound.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby azule » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:23 pm UTC

I can't wait to see the people re-entering this thread's reaction. Actually, that thought is kinda turning me on now. :shock:

















*kidding?
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby KarMann » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:27 pm UTC

Mr Moriaty wrote:do we have a need for some kind of Holy Geophysicist? it seems to be a niche that fake Vatican based pope bloke has missed.
I'm sure there are some rocks that would actually be pretty good at "waiting for it".

Well, I ken know that the Outside Vatican heretics do have an actual Vatican Astronomer, complete with a fairly impressive Vatican Observatory just a few megapixels from me. So, a Holy Geophysicist makes perfect sense. Especially if you could ascertain for us whether that material be sand or not.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby KarMann » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:28 pm UTC

Smithers wrote:
Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:<lots of nesting>
Smithers wrote:Try reading 'than' in place of 'then'.

</lots of nesting>
As are "I'd rather cuddle, then have sex" and "I'd rather cuddle than have sex".

But that requires a change to the word 'then/than,' rather than just a comma change.

It's been implied, but in particular, you see a lot of confusion between the two in casual writing on the Internet. Allot!
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby KarMann » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:28 pm UTC

speising wrote:
boozledorf wrote:
12obin wrote:
Smithers wrote:What a difference the comma makes in "Helping your uncle Jack, off his horse" and "Let's eat, Grandma".


Surely if you were instructing me to assist my uncle Jack in dismounting a horse, "Help your uncle Jack off his horse", with no comma, would be correct. Ambiguous, yes, but it's a correct way to say it.
I was trying to come up with a less ambiguous way to say it, without saying "dismount" I mean, but "Help your uncle get off the horse" sounds pretty bad too now that you've got me thinking that way.
"Help your uncle to stop being on a horse..."

"Help your uncle down from the horse"
"Help your uncle from the horse"
"Help your uncle down"
"Help your uncle to the ground"


or jack could try to "off" a horse.
but why should i help him kill that poor creature?

So we can beat it, of course.
P.S. I am Randall, but not that Randall.
We can rebuild it. We have the technology. We can make it better than it was. Better … stronger … well, maybe not faster.
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Illud expecto, ergo sum.

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby KarMann » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:29 pm UTC

Helper wrote:
Smithers wrote:
azule wrote:You can make anything dirty

I'd like to double your entendre.

I always enjoyed the fact that 'double entendre' sounds like it involves entering something. Twice. :lol:

Something tender, I presume.

(OK, done for now.)
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Illud expecto, ergo sum.

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby azule » Tue Apr 02, 2013 10:33 pm UTC

KarMann wrote:So we can beat it, of course.

Beat it off, of course.
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